Revisiting the Text: What Are the Adversities They Face? | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U2:L10

Revisiting the Text: What Are the Adversities They Face?

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can make a claim to answer the question in the assessment prompt.
  • I can evaluate evidence to choose the most compelling and relevant for my literary argument essay. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Simon, the Knight's Son" (from homework)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: "Simon, the Knight's Son" (6 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Discussing the Rubric (6 minutes)

B. Revisiting Themes of Adversity Graphic Organizers (9 minutes)

C. Evaluating Evidence to Choose Which to Use in the Essay (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read "A Little Background: The Crusades" (pages 36 and 37) and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

  • In this lesson, students make a claim about two adversities faced by people in the Middle Ages that they want to focus on in their essay.  They also choose text-based evidence they would like to use to support their claim.
  • Most students will probably make the claim that we do still struggle with some of the adversities faced by people in the Middle Ages; however, students have to decide for themselves which way to argue and which claim to make, so examples and options for both claims are offered. If students make the claim that we do not struggle with the same adversities today that were faced in the Middle Ages, they still need to choose two adversities faced by people in the Middle Ages to discuss in their essay and their "life today" examples need to explain how those adversities are no longer faced by people today.
  • Students will need to refer to all of the Themes of Adversity graphic organizers they have completed for each monologue read during the unit so far. At the end of the lesson they receive a new  blank Themes of Adversity graphic organizer to complete their homework (for pages 36 and 37 "A Little Background: The Crusades").
  • Create a new Writing Word Wall.  This differs from the Academic Word Wall used previously, as words collected here are primarily domain-specific, and meant to scaffold students in their writing.
  • Post: Learning targets. 

Vocabulary

claim; Saracens, lance, valiant, chivalry

Materials

  • Writing Word Wall (new; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
  • Are We Medieval? A Literary Argument Essay Prompt (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Literary Argument Essay Rubric (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizers (students' completed organizers, for each monologue read during this unit)
  • Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 9; one new blank copy per student and one to display)
  • Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "A Little Background: The Crusades" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: "Simon, the Knight's Son" (6 minutes)

  • Ask students to take out their Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "Simon, the Knight's Son" and share their responses with a partner; they should make revisions to their graphic organizer as necessary.
  • Select volunteers to share out. Listen for:

-    The theme of adversity in the monologue is a lack of money for Simon to do exactly what he wants to do when he gets older, which is become a knight. As a result of the lack of money, Simon may have to become a monk instead.

-    The text evidence they may cite for this comes from the second and final paragraphs, "We had to sell some of our land--we had land then--to pay for his weapons, armor, a horse. My father came back home a year ago, half-starved, horseless, on one leg" and "Except there is no money, and my mother says I have to be a monk."

-    The group of people affected are knights and their families.

  • Ask students to discuss with their partner:

* "Is this an adversity we face today?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that not having enough money to do what we want to do is an adversity faced today, although there are more opportunities for those without money. Some people who would like to go to college to study to become something in particular, for example a doctor, may not have enough money to do so.
  • Ask:

*  "Is there any domain-specific vocabulary we could add to the Word Wall from this monologue?"

  • Record student suggestions on the Writing Word Wall. Words should include: Saracenslancevaliant, and chivalry. You may need to tell students what some of the unfamiliar words mean.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELLs who speak the same first language in order to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets and invite them to read along with you:

* "I can make a claim to answer the question in the assessment prompt."

* "I can evaluate evidence to choose the most compelling and relevant for my literary argument essay."

  • Tell students to reread the Are We Medieval? A Literary Argument Essay Prompt. Ask:

* "What is a claim?"

* "What claim are you going to be making in this essay?"

  • Listen for them to explain that they are going to be making a claim about whether we still struggle with the same adversities faced by people in the Middle Ages.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Discussing the Rubric (6 minutes)

  • Display the Literary Argument Essay Rubric and display a copy via a document camera. Explain that this is almost exactly the same rubric from Module 1, with one addition. Direct students' attention to the displayed rubric.
  • Circle or highlight the Command of Evidence section, "skillfully and logically explain how evidence supports ideas" in Level 4 and "logically explain how evidence supports ideas" in Level 3.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

* "What does it mean to 'logically explain' your evidence?"

  • Refocus students whole class. Cold call students to share. Listen for them to say the explanations have to be clear and easy to follow. If students need support with their explanation of logical, ask them to call on another pair of students. If they still need support defining logical after they have called on each other a few rounds, give them the explanation.
  • Ask them to turn and talk again:

* "What does it mean to 'skillfully explain' your evidence?"

  • Refocus students whole class. Ask for volunteers to share their answers. Consider that skillful might be harder to explain. Listen for students to say that skillful is about selecting the best and most appropriate evidence to support your claim. Again, provide this definition if students do not have the answer on their own.
  • Tell them that over the next couple of lessons, they are going to select evidence to use in their essays.
  • Consider providing select students with a version of the rubric that highlights the 3 score column to guide them toward the level you would like them to focus on.

B. Revisiting Themes of Adversity Graphic Organizers (9 minutes)

  • Invite students to take out all of the Themes of Adversity graphic organizers they have completed for each of the monologues so far. Explain that today they are going to reread each of the organizers with a focus particularly on the lines at the bottom, where they have discussed whether that adversity is still evident today.
  • Tell students to work with an elbow partner to reread and sort their organizers into two piles: those that contain adversities not faced today, and those that contain adversities we still face today.
  • Circulate to support students as they work. If they struggle, break down the process with questions like:

* "Is this adversity still faced today? By whom? Where? When?"

* "So which pile should this go in?"

  • Refocus whole group. Ask students to refer back to the Are We Medieval? A Literary Argument Essay Prompt and then, based on the way they have organized their Themes of Adversity graphic organizers, ask them to discuss in pairs:

* "So what is the question you are being asked to answer? And based on the way you have sorted your graphic organizers, what is your claim? Do we still struggle with any of the same adversities as people in the Middle Ages?"

  • The claim students make will be based on what they have recorded on their organizers, but most should have at least one or two organizers that contain adversities we still face today.

C. Evaluating Evidence to Choose Which to Use in the Essay (15 minutes)

  • Display and distribute Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims Graphic Organizer.
  • Remind students that they saw this graphic organizer filled out in the previous lesson for the model essay.
  • Tell students that in this lesson, they are going to focus on filling out just the claim and text evidence rows of the organizer.
  • Ask:

* "So what is your claim? Do we still struggle with any of the same adversities? Yes or no? What do your Themes of Adversity graphic organizers suggest?"

  • Invite students to write their claim in the top box of their Forming Evidence-Based Claims organizer. Either "We do still struggle with some of the same adversities as the people in the Middle Ages" or "We don't struggle with any of the same adversities as the people in the Middle Ages."
  • Tell students that now that they have made their claim, they need to choose which two adversities from the Middle Ages they are going to discuss in their essay to support their claim.
  • Explain that if students are making the claim that we do still struggle with the same adversities today, they need to choose two adversities faced in the Middle Ages that they have clear examples for from life today. Provide the example that if students want to use the adversity that both in the Middle Ages and today you are restricted in what you can do in the future (for a job/career) based on how much money your family has, they need to not only have text evidence from Good Masters! Sweet Ladies! that states this, but they also need to be able to provide an example from life today of this adversity. For example, you might not be able to go to college to study what you want to study if your family can't afford the fees.
  • Explain that if students are making the claim that we don't struggle with the same adversities today, they need to choose two adversities faced in the Middle Ages and provide examples from life today that show that we don't struggle with them today. Provide the example that if students want to argue that in the Middle Ages, people were restricted in what they could do in the future (for a job/career) based on how much money their family had, but that this isn't an issue today, they need to provide an example of why this isn't a challenge today. For example, you can get scholarships and student loans for college if your family can't afford to pay, or you can go to college part time and work to pay your way through.
  • Invite students to work with the same partner to go through each of the organizers in the appropriate pile to determine which adversities they have clear examples of from life today. Remind them to focus their attention on what they have written at the end of their organizers.
  • Circulate to support students. Encourage them to, when possible, consider adversities that they have experience with so that they can provide those examples in their essay. Provide the example that someone in their family may not have been able to pursue the career they would like because the family was unable to pay college fees. Ask:

* "What is your example from life today for this adversity? Is it something you or your family has experienced?"

  • Refocus the group. Tell students that now that they have identified the adversities they can support, they need to choose which two to use in their essay.
  • Remind them that the prompt asks them to use two adversities in their essay to argue their claim. Tell students that to do this, they need to evaluate the adversities they have identified to determine which are the most compelling to discuss in an essay. Ask:

* "What does compelling mean, and why do your adversities need to be compelling?"

  • Select students to share. Listen for them to explain that compelling means that it makes people want to continue reading, and their adversities need to be compelling so that people want to read the whole essay.
  • Select a volunteer to help you model choosing the two adversities to use in his or her essay. Invite the whole group to help. Read through the information collected on each organizer and ask:

* "This is the claim, so which of the adversities has the clearest and most compelling text evidence to explain the adversity?"

* "This is the claim, so which of the adversities has the clearest and most compelling example from life today?"

  • Invite the whole group to help you choose two adversities to support the claim the volunteer student is making. Model filling out the Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer with the two adversities. 
  • Next, model how to evaluate the text evidence to choose the most compelling to explain the adversity. Look at the text evidence recorded on the relevant Themes of Adversity graphic organizers and ask:

* "Which of this text evidence explains the adversity most clearly?"

* "Which of the text evidence is the most compelling?"

  • Invite the whole group to help you choose the text evidence they think should be used and model how to record it on the Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims organizer. The 'Examples from life today' will be added in the next lesson, so instruct students to leave that for now.
  • Invite students to work in pairs to choose two adversities and fill out their evidence-based claims organizer.
  • Circulate to ask questions:

* "Which of the adversities has the clearest and most compelling text evidence to explain the adversity for your claim?"

* "Which of the adversities has the clearest and most compelling example from life today for your claim?"

  • Remind students to record the adversities and the text evidence they choose on their Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially those who are challenged.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Pair Share (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to pair up with someone else to share what they have filled in on their Are We Medieval?: Forming Evidence-Based Claims organizer so far.
  • Distribute a blank Themes of Adversity graphic organizer for "A Little Background: the Crusades" for homework.

Homework

Homework
  • Read "A Little Background: The Crusades" (pages 36 and 37) and complete the Themes of Adversity graphic organizer.

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