Writing a Summary: “Middle Ages” Excerpt 2 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U1:L5

Writing a Summary: “Middle Ages” Excerpt 2

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits in and contributes to the development of ideas in a text. (RI.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can determine the main idea of Excerpt 2 of "Middle Ages."
  • I can summarize Excerpt 2 of "Middle Ages."
  • I can explain how a section of text contributes to the meaning of the whole of Excerpt 2 of "Middle Ages."

Ongoing Assessment

  • QuickWrite 2 (from homework)
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer for Excerpt 2 of "Middle Ages" (from Lesson 3)
  • Written summary of Excerpt 2 of "Middle Ages"
  • Exit Ticket: A Focus Research Group

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework QuickWrite (7 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Completing Summary Writing Graphic Organizer (13 minutes)

B. Writing a Summary (13 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: A Focus Research Group (10 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Familiarize yourself with the researcher's notebook. Look at what you are going to need to fill in as you do your research, but do not fill anything in.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 3. This is the second lesson in the two-lesson cycle in which students will write a summary of the excerpt of text read in the previous lesson and then analyze how part of the text contributes to the whole.
  • Students already analyzed how part of the text fits into the whole to address RI.6.5 for homework in a QuickWrite. This is reviewed in detail at the beginning of the lesson to ensure that students thoroughly understand.
  • Students use a Summary Writing graphic organizer to identify a main idea and key details to include in their summary. This time, they complete the organizer in pairs without any teacher modeling. They also write their summary without any teacher modeling in this lesson in order to release them as they work toward the Mid-Unit 1 Assessment.
  • At the end of the lesson, students complete an exit ticket, choosing a specific group to focus on for their research. Collect these at the end of the lesson and use them to group students into research teams for Lesson 6.
  • For homework, students familiarize themselves with the researcher's notebook that they will use in the following lessons to record their research.
  • In advance: In the next lesson, students are given research folders. Be sure to have these folders prepared (see supporting materials of Lesson 6).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

main idea, summary

Materials

  • "Middle Ages" Excerpt 2 (from Lesson 4; one per student)
  • Summary Writing graphic organizer (from Lesson 3; one per student and one to display)
  • Lined paper (one piece per student)
  • Exit Ticket: A Focus Research Group (one per student)
  • Researcher's notebook (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Homework QuickWrite (7 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread "Middle Ages" Excerpt 2.
  • Remind them of the focus question for homework:

* "The second paragraph states, 'As private wars became less frequent, trade became easier.' How does this sentence move the excerpt into describing life in the towns?"

  • Remind students that in both informational and literary texts, certain significant sentences or phrases can have an impact on the meaning of the whole text and on the development of ideas within a text. Tell them that for homework, they analyzed the impact one sentence has on the text. Ask them to share their QuickWrite 2 responses to this question with an elbow partner.
  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the sentence helps us to understand the link between trade and towns and sets us up to understand why towns were able to grow, which leads into describing the townspeople.
  • Opening the lesson by asking students to share their homework makes them accountable for completing it. It also gives you the opportunity to monitor which students are not doing their homework.
  • Consider pairing ELLs who speak the same first language in order to deepen their discussion and understanding.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can determine the main idea of Excerpt 2 of 'Middle Ages.'"

* "I can summarize Excerpt 2 of 'Middle Ages.'"

* "I can explain how a section of text contributes to the meaning of the whole of Excerpt 2 of 'Middle Ages.'"

  • Remind students what a main idea and summary are.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Reviewing the key academic vocabulary in learning targets can prepare students for vocabulary they may encounter in the lesson.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Completing Summary Writing Graphic Organizer (13 minutes)

  • Distribute the Summary Writing graphic organizer. Remind students that it will help them think through the main idea and key details in a text in order to write a summary of it. Remind them that eventually they will no longer need to use the organizer because they will remember the steps of the process without it.
  • Invite students to reread the instructions at the top of the organizer. Ask pairs to take a few minutes to review their gist notes and to identify a main idea--an idea that runs throughout the text--and to record this main idea in the Main Idea space on their organizers.
  • Select volunteers to share the main idea they recorded. Listen for them to explain that a main idea is that townspeople and monks and nuns faced adversity in the Middle Ages.
  • Refocus students on the Key Details boxes of the organizer. Remind them that the key details are the most important details in the excerpt.
  • Ask pairs to review their gist notes paragraph by paragraph to identify the key details--the most important details--and to add them to the organizer. Emphasize that they do not need to fill all of the boxes; they may find that many key details, but they may not. Encourage them to focus on the most important details.
  • Circulate to support students by asking:

* "What seems most important from this section of the article? Why?"

* "If someone hadn't read this article, what would she most need to know?"

  • Refocus whole group and invite students to share their key details. Listen for them to list:

-    "Lords demanded tolls from merchants for protection."

-    "Townspeople were mostly merchants and artisans."

-     "Merchants and artisans formed guilds."

-    "Every town had a church and a priest to perform religious services to the community."

-    "Monks and nuns fulfilled a number of roles, including working in the fields, feeding the poor, and copying books."

  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning. For students who need additional support, you may want to provide a partially filled-in graphic organizer.

B. Writing a Summary (13 minutes)

  • Tell students that they can now use the information they have recorded on their organizer to write a summary.
  • Distribute lined paper. Invite students to work in pairs and use their completed Summary Writing graphic organizers to write a summary paragraph.
  • Circulate to support pairs in writing a summary. Ask guiding questions:

* "How can you organize these details into a sentence? It will sound strange if you make lots of small sentences using each of your key details, so how can you combine some of them to make a longer sentence?"

  • Invite students to pair up with someone else to share their summaries.
  • Encourage them to revise their summaries based on their new partner's work, if they think it's necessary.
  • Select some volunteers to share their summaries with the whole class.
  • Consider grouping students who may need additional support and working with them as a group.
  • Encourage students who struggle to say their sentences aloud to you before they write them down.
  • Allowing students to pair up to share work can provide them with informal peer feedback and enable them to revise their work based on what they see in the work of others.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Exit Ticket: A Focus Research Group (10 minutes)

  • Distribute Exit Ticket: A Focus Research Group. Remind students that for homework in Lesson 3, they chose a group that they were most interested in researching. Invite them to refer to that to remind themselves which group they identified.
  • Explain that, now that students have read another excerpt including more groups of people, they are to determine which of the groups of people listed on the exit ticket they would like to focus their research on. Tell students that their research will focus on the adversities faced by that group of people, so this should factor into their decision.
  • Invite them to spend some time thinking and looking through the text excerpts to choose a group to focus their research on and to circle that group on the exit ticket.
  • Collect the exit tickets.
  • Distribute the researcher's notebook.

Homework

Homework
  • Familiarize yourself with the researcher's notebook. Look at what you are going to need to fill in as you do your research, but do not fill anything in.

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