Drafting Introduction and Conclusion | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U1:L12

Drafting Introduction and Conclusion

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my essay.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Draft of introductory and concluding paragraphs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Studying the Model and Drafting an Introductory Paragraph(15 minutes)

B. Studying the Model and Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Writing a Works Cited List (12 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish writing the Introductory and concluding paragraphs on your essay.

  • In this lesson, students draft the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their end of unit essay. They revisit the model to get a firm grounding in what their introduction and conclusion should include.
  • Be prepared to return any body paragraphs you collected in the previous lesson; students will need these to write their introductory and concluding paragraphs, but collect all students' body paragraphs again at the end of the lesson to provide feedback against Rows 2 and 4 of the NYS Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for revision (step) for both Rows 2 and 4.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Materials

  • Model Essay: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Equity sticks
  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Prompt: Adversity in the Middle Ages (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Lined paper (1-2 pieces per student)
  • Researcher's notebook (from Lesson 5; one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Target (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning target with you:

* "I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my essay."

  • Ask them to discuss with an elbow partner:

* "What do you think you will be doing in this lesson?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to say that they will write the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their essay.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying the Model and Drafting an Introductory Paragraph (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have written a first draft of the body paragraphs of their essay and know what ideas they introduced in them, they are going to finish by drafting introductory and concluding paragraphs. Explain that these work to support the body paragraphs by introducing them and then closing the essay afterward.
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the introduction of the Model Essay: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages.
  • Ask students to discuss in pairs:

* "What is the purpose of the introduction?"

* "What does the author include in the introductory paragraph?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the purpose of the introduction is to introduce readers to the content of the essay and to prepare them for what they are about to read.
  • Invite students to reread their draft body paragraphs and the End of Unit 1 Assessment Prompt: Adversity in the Middle Ages to ground themselves in the task.
  • Ask them to pair up with a different  student to verbally rehearse an introductory paragraph for their essays. Remind them to refer to the model essay as a guide.
  • Invite a few volunteers to share their verbal rehearsals with the whole group.
  • Distribute lined paper. Invite students to draft their introductory paragraph using their verbal rehearsal. Remind them that they are to write independently, without talking to classmates.
  • Circulate to assist students in drafting their introductory paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you begin the paragraph?"

* "How did the author begin the model essay?"

* "What is it important for the reader to know right at the beginning? Why?"

  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.
  • Allowing students to discuss their thinking with their peers before writing helps to scaffold student comprehension and assists in language acquisition for ELLs.
  • Consider placing students in homogeneous pairs and providing more specific, direct support to students who need it most.

B. Studying the Model and Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the concluding paragraph of the Model Essay: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages.
  • Ask pairs to discuss:

* "What is the purpose of the conclusion?"

* "How does the author end the essay in the concluding paragraph?"

  • Consider using equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the purpose of the conclusion is to summarize the points made in the essay and then leave the reader with something to think about.
  • Ask students to work with their partner to verbally rehearse a concluding paragraph for their essays. Remind them to refer to the model essay as a guide.
  • Ask a couple of volunteers to share their verbal rehearsals with the whole group.
  • Invite students to draft their concluding paragraph based on their oral rehearsal. Remind students that at this point, they are to write independently, without talking to classmates.
  • Circulate to assist students in drafting their concluding paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you begin the concluding paragraph?"

* "How did the author end the model essay?"

* "What idea are you going to leave the reader with? Why?"

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Writing a Works Cited List (12 minutes)

  • Remind students of the third bullet on the assessment prompt, "Include a Works Cited list," and invite students to refer to the Works Cited List at the bottom of the model essay.
  • Ask students to look at the format of the Works Cited list:

-    Author's last name, author's first name and middle initial. "Name of text." Where the text was found and when it was published. When the text was found.

  • Invite students to revisit their researcher's notebook to write a Works Cited list for the evidence they have used in their body paragraphs.
  • Circulate to support students in writing their Works Cited list under their concluding paragraph.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish writing the introductory and concluding paragraphs of your essay.

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