Drafting Body Paragraphs | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G6:M2B:U1:L11

Drafting Body Paragraphs

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use my Quote sandwich organizers to draft the body paragraphs of my essay.
  • I can maintain a formal style in my writing.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Quote Sandwich graphic organizers (from homework)
  • Three draft body paragraphs

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Language Mini Lesson: Formal Style (15 minutes)

B. Drafting Body Paragraphs (22 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Partner Share: One Body Paragraph (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Finish writing the three body paragraphs of your essay.

  • In this lesson, students use the Quote sandwich graphic organizers started in the previous lesson and completed for homework to draft the body paragraphs of their essays. The Quote sandwich organizer has been designed so that students should need minimal guidance in how to use it to write a paragraph. It is modeled briefly at the beginning of the lesson, however, to ensure that students understand the expectations of their work.
  • To address W.6.2e, students have a mini lesson on formal style. To fully understand what formal style is, they compare two examples. If they still struggle to understand the difference, you may want to provide further examples for them to compare--for example, a textbook and a letter to a friend.
  • You are going to provide feedback on the body paragraphs in Lesson 13, so collect paragraphs from those students who have finished at the end of the lesson and provide feedback on as many as you can between this lesson and the next. Provide feedback against Rows 2 and 4 of the NYS Grades 6-8 Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for revision (step) for both Rows 2 and 4. Students will need their draft paragraphs returned in the next lesson to write their introductory and concluding paragraphs.
  • Those students who require more time may finish their body paragraphs for homework but should be prepared to bring them in to the next lesson. Collect these at the end of Lesson 12 to provide feedback in Lesson 13.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

formal style 

Materials

  • End of Unit 1 Assessment Prompt: Adversity in the Middle Ages (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Model Essay: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages (from Lesson 9; one per student)
  • Quote Sandwich Guide: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages (from Lesson 10; one to display)
  • Formal Style Examples (one per student and one to display)
  • Formal Style anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see Work Time A)
  • Lined paper (two pieces per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can use my Quote Sandwich organizers to draft the body paragraphs of my essay."

* "I can maintain a formal style in my writing."

  • Ask them to discuss with an elbow partner:

* "What is a formal style?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Provide the comparison between the writing in a textbook and the writing in a letter to a friend. A textbook is more formal. It is designed to inform a large audience, whereas a letter to a friend is less formal because it is written for one specific person and so is more like a conversation.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Language Mini Lesson: Formal Style (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to reread the End of Unit 1 Assessment Prompt: Adversity in the Middle Ages to ground themselves in what is expected of them.
  • Invite them to reread the body paragraphs of the Model Essay: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages and to compare the Quote Sandwich Guide: Adversity Faced by Townspeople in the Middle Ages to the third body paragraph of the model essay.
  • Ask pairs to discuss:

* "How did the author of the model essay use the quote sandwich to write the third body paragraph of the model essay?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the author of the model joined the pieces of the quote sandwich together to write the third body paragraph.
  • Explain that students are going to do exactly that as they draft their body paragraphs.
  • Remind them that the learning target requests that they maintain a formal style. Distribute the Formal Style Examples. Explain that the first example is the third paragraph of the model essay, and the second example is a less formal version. Invite them to read both of the examples with you.
  • Ask pairs to discuss:

* "In what ways does the first example sound more formal?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for them to explain that the first example is more formal because it sounds like something you would read in a textbook, whereas the second example sounds like someone speaking to a friend. The vocabulary in the first example is more varied and complex, and the vocabulary in the second example is simple and includes slang.
  • Record students' responses on the Formal Styleanchor chart. Ensure that the following are included:

-    Avoid using contractions (e.g., instead of "don't," use "do not").

-    Avoid using slang (e.g., instead of "awesome," use "very good").

-   Use more varied and mature vocabulary (e.g., "wonderful" instead of "good").

  • Providing good and bad examples for students to compare can highlight the differences between good and bad work and provide them with guidelines and expectations.

B. Drafting Body Paragraphs (22 minutes)

  • Distribute lined paper. Invite students to use their three Quote Sandwich graphic organizers to draft the body paragraphs of their essay. Remind them to refer to the Formal Style anchor chart to ensure that they maintain a formal style in their writing.
  • Explain that students can discuss ideas with a partner, but they are to write these paragraphs independently, as they are working toward the end of unit assessment.
  • Circulate to support students as they write their body paragraphs. 
  • Consider inviting students who require additional support to sit in a group with you so that you can support them all at once.
  • Encourage students who require additional support to say their ideas aloud to you before writing them down.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Share: One Body Paragraph (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to choose one of the paragraphs to read to a partner. Encourage them to choose a paragraph that they aren't sure about and would like some help with.
  • Encourage students to focus on formal style when providing any kind of feedback and remind them to be careful and polite when giving feedback.
  • Consider pairing up ELLs who speak the same first language to encourage a deeper discussion about their work.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish writing the three body paragraphs of your essay.

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up