Performance Task Preparation: Peer Critique and Mini-Lesson Addressing Common Errors: Revising Draft Evidence-Based Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L8

Performance Task Preparation: Peer Critique and Mini-Lesson Addressing Common Errors: Revising Draft Evidence-Based Essay

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)
  • I can use correct capitalization, punctuation, and spelling to send a clear message to my reader. (L.6.2)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.
  • I can use teacher feedback to revise my essay to further meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Revised draft of informative essay
  • Exit ticket: How Is Your Essay Better after Applying Peer Feedback to Revise?

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A.  Independent Reading: Five Vocabulary Words (5 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Mini Lesson: Addressing Common Errors (5 minutes)

     B.  Peer Critique: Draft Essay (13 minutes)

     C.  Revising Draft Essay (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: How Is Your Essay Better after Applying Peer Feedback to Revise? (5 minutes)

4.    Homework

     A. Continue independent reading. Consider this question: What was the author's purpose or purposes in writing this book?

  • This lesson is an opportunity for students to review and revise their essays to meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric.
  • This lesson includes 5 minutes to address common mistakes you may have noticed while reviewing some of the student essays. A sample structure is provided here. Focus the lesson on one specific common convention error you noticed as you assessed students' drafts.
  • Some students may need more help with revising than others. There is space for this during the revision time.
  • If students used computers in Lessons 6 and 7 to write their first draft, allow them to use computers to revise.
  • In advance: Prepare a chart with the Peer Critique Guidelines, or a copy of the guidelines for students to keep in their folders (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets; end of unit assessment prompt.

Vocabulary

peer critique

Materials

  • Document camera
  • Students' draft essays (collected in Lesson 7 for spot-checking)
  • Peer Critique Guidelines (one to display) (From Unit 2, Lesson 16)
  • NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (from Lesson 6; one for display and one per student)
  • Stars and Steps recording form (one per student)
  • Exit ticket: How Is Your Module 2A Essay Better after Applying Peer Feedback to Revise? (one per student; builds on similar document from Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Reading: Five Vocabulary Words (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to pair up to share the five words that grabbed their attention in their independent reading and to explain why those words grabbed their attention.
  • Circulate to listen and get an idea of who has been completing the independent reading homework.
  • Invite students to choose the word that grabbed their attention the most from the five their partner listed.
  • Invite students to pair up with someone else to share the one word they selected from the lists of their previous partners.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group. Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*  "I can use the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers."

*  "I can use teacher feedback to revise my essay to further meet the expectations of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric."

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does peer critique mean?"

* "Why is peer critiquing useful?"

  • Listen for: "Peer critique means to look at someone else's work and give them feedback that will help them to improve their writing." Clarify as needed.

* "Now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today? Why?"

  • Listen for: "Reading other essays and providing feedback and improving my essay." 
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Mini Lesson: Addressing Common Errors (5 minutes)

  • Tell students that in the assessments you have looked at so far, you have noticed a common error in their essays (for instance, inconsistent capitalization).
  • Using a document camera, display a teacher made example of the error, not actual student work. Explain why it is incorrect.
  • Model how to revise and correct the error.
  • Check for understanding. Ask students to give you a thumbs-up if they understand the error and how to fix it when revising, or a thumbs-down if they don't understand fully.
  • If many students give a thumbs-down, show another example of the error. Ask students to think about how to fix it.
  • Cold call a student to suggest how to correct it. If the answer is incorrect, clarify. Again ask students to give you a thumbs-up or a thumbs-down. If some students are still struggling, consider checking in with them individually.
  • Return students' draft essays. Tell students that they won't have feedback from you on their individual work until the next lesson because you need more time to assess them.

B. Peer Critique: Draft Essay (15 minutes)

  • Explain that peer critiquing must be done very carefully because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad. Post the Peer Critique Guidelines:
  1. Be kind: Always treat others with dignity and respect. This means we never use words that are hurtful, including sarcasm.
  2. Be specific: Focus on particular strengths and weaknesses rather than making general comments like "It's good" or "I like it." Provide insight into why it is good or what, specifically, you like about it.
  3. Be helpful: The goal is to positively contribute to the individual or the group, not to simply be heard. Echoing the thoughts of others or cleverly pointing out details that are irrelevant wastes time.
  4. Participate: Peer critique is a process to support each other, and your feedback is valued!
  • Display the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric and ask students to refer to their own copies.
  • Focus students on Row 2, Command of Evidence. In Column 3, highlight/underline this section: "Develop the topic with relevant facts, definitions, details, quotations, or other information and examples from the text(s)."
  • Focus students on Row 3, Coherence, Organization, and Style. In Column 3, highlight/underline this section: "Exhibit clear organization, with the use of appropriate transitions to create a unified whole."
  • Invite students to read each of these sections of the rubric aloud with you. Tell them that during the peer critique time they will be focusing on these two specific elements of the evidence-based essay.
  • Emphasize that their job is to make sure that their peers' use of evidence and organization is strong. Distinguish peer critique from proofreading. It is fine if they catch errors in each other's work, but the goal is to make the thinking in the writing as strong as possible.
  • Tell students that they will present feedback in the form of stars and steps. Remind them that they have already done this in both Modules 1 and 2. Today, they will give two "stars" (one related to Row 2 of the NYS rubric, one related to Row 3), and two "steps" (one related to Row 2, and one related to Row 3).
  • Briefly model how to give two "kind, specific, helpful" stars. Be sure to connect your comments directly to each row of the rubric. For example: "You have used details from research texts to support your claims, and you used the word 'Finally' to begin your conclusion, which is a good transitional word."
  • Repeat, briefly modeling how to give two "kind, specific, helpful" steps. For example: "Can you find a detail from an informational text to support that claim? Can you add a transition word at the beginning of this paragraph to make the paragraphs flow smoothly into each other?"
  • Emphasize that it is especially important to be kind when giving steps. Asking a question of the writer is often a good way to do this. "I wonder if ...?" "Have you thought about ...?"
  • Distribute the Stars and Steps recording form. Explain that today, students will record the stars and steps for their partner on this sheet so that their partner can remember the feedback he or she receives. They are to write the name of their partner at the top of their paper.
  • Pair up students. Invite pairs to swap essays and to spend 3 minutes reading them in silence.
  • Ask students to record stars and steps for their partner on the recording form. This form is designed to help them remember the feedback they want to give to their partner from the peer critique. Circulate to assist students who may struggle with recording their feedback.
  • Ask students to return the essay and Stars and Steps recording form to their partner and to explain the stars and steps they recorded for their partner. Invite students to question their partner where they don't understand the stars and steps they have been given.
  • Set up peer critiquing very carefully to ensure students feel safe giving and receiving feedback. Students must be given a set of clear guidelines for behavior, and they need to see the teacher model how to do it successfully. Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both parties in clarifying what a strong piece of writing should look like. Students can learn from both the strengths and weaknesses that they notice in the work of peers.

C. Revising Draft Essay (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to begin revising their draft essays based on the mini lesson and the stars and steps from the peer critique.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: How Is Your Essay Better after Applying Feedback to Revise? (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the exit ticket: How Is Your Essay Better after Applying Peer Feedback to Revise?
  • Give students a couple of minutes to consider the question.
  • Invite students to record their answers on the exit ticket.
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • Continue independent reading. Consider this question: What was the author's purpose or purposes in writing this book?

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