End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Drafting Introduction and Conclusion of an Evidence-Based Essay | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L7

End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 2: Drafting Introduction and Conclusion of an Evidence-Based Essay

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of an informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my informative essay.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Draft of essay to inform
  • Self-assessment against Rows 1 and 3 of NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Studying the Model and Drafting an Introductory Paragraph (18 minutes)

     B.  Studying the Model and Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (18 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Self-Assessment against the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Continue independent reading. Select five words that grabbed your attention and describe what it is about those words that caught your eye.

  • In this lesson, students draft the introductory and concluding paragraphs for their end of unit assessment "My Rule to Live By" evidence-based essay. They revisit the model to get a firm grounding in what their introduction and conclusion should look like.
  • By the end of this lesson, students should have finished their draft evidence-based essay for their end of unit assessment. Those students who have not finished their draft by the end of this lesson will benefit from taking it home to finish it for homework.
  • Be prepared to provide students with feedback in Lesson 9 using Row 2 of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for each student to revise (step).
  • Students will need their draft essays for peer critique in the next lesson, but these should be collected again at the end of 
    Lesson 8 to continue assessing.
  • If students used computers in Lesson 6 to write their first draft, allow them to use computers to revise.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

introduction, conclusion

Materials

  • Model Essay: "The Importance of Reading Every Day" (from Lesson 5)
  • Equity sticks
  • Chart paper (one piece; see Work Time A and B)
  • NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (Rows 1 and 3) (one per student)
  • Self-Assessment: NYS Expository Evaluation Writing Rubric (Rows 1 and 3) (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can draft the introduction and conclusion of my informative essay."

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "How are introductions and conclusions similar types of writing?"

  • Listen for responses, or guide students toward responses, such as: "They are both writing about the whole essay in some way," or "They are both 'big idea' writing and are not about details."
  • Again, invite students Think-Pair-Share:

* "How are introductions and conclusions different?"

  • Listen for responses such as: "The introduction should get the reader interested in the topic, while the conclusion should wrap up the essay in some way." 
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Drafting an Introductory Paragraph (18 minutes)

  • Display "The Importance of Reading Every Day" model essay. Tell students that now that they have written a first draft of the body paragraphs of their argument essay, they are going to finish their end of unit assessment by completing the first draft of their informative essay by drafting introductory and concluding paragraphs.
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the introduction of "The Importance of Reading Every Day" model essay.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does the author tell us in the introductory paragraph?"

  • Use equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Record student responses on chart paper for students to refer to throughout the lesson. Ensure the following are included:
    • An introductory paragraph:
    • Begins with a quote to hook readers' attention
    • Introduces the idea of rules to live by
    • Presents a rule
    • Explains where the evidence came from
  • Invite students to pair up to verbally rehearse their introductory paragraphs. Remind students to refer to the notes on the chart paper.
  • Circulate to assist students in verbally rehearsing their introductory paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you begin the paragraph?"

* "How did the author begin the model argument essay?" Did you find any quotes about your rule to live by that will capture a reader's attention?"

* "What is important for the reader to know right at the beginning? Why?"

* "What is your rule to live by?"

  • Invite students to draft their introductory paragraph using their verbal rehearsal and the notes on the chart paper. Students may need access to their research materials in order to locate a quote to use in their introduction.
  • Again circulate to assist students in drafting their introductory paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you begin the paragraph?"

* "How did the author begin the model argument essay?"

*  "What is important for the reader to know right at the beginning? Why?"

* "What is your rule to live by?"

  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.
  • Allowing students to discuss their thinking with peers before writing helps to scaffold student comprehension as well as assist in language acquisition for ELLs.
  • Consider placing students in homogeneous pairs and provide more specific, direct support to students who need it most.

B. Drafting a Concluding Paragraph (18 minutes)

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share the question from earlier in the lesson:

*  "In this type of an essay, how are introductions and conclusions similar?"

  • Listen for responses, or guide students toward responses, such as: "They are both writing about the whole essay in some way," or "They are both 'big idea' writing and are not about details."
  • Again, invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "How are introductions and conclusions different?"

  • Listen for responses such as: "The introduction should get the reader interested in the topic, while the conclusion should wrap up the essay in some way."
  • Invite students to read along silently as you read the concluding paragraph of "The Importance of Reading Every Day" model essay.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does the author tell us in the concluding paragraph?"

  • Use equity sticks to select students to share their responses. Record student responses on the same piece of chart paper under the notes about the introductory paragraph for students to refer to throughout the lesson. Ensure the following are included:
  • A concluding paragraph:
  • Summarizes the main ideas
  • Closes the paragraph by giving us something to think about at the very end
  • Invite students to pair up with another student to verbally rehearse their concluding paragraph. Remind students to refer to the notes on the chart paper.
  • Circulate to assist students in verbally rehearsing their concluding paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you summarize the main ideas?"

* "How did the author conclude the model argument essay?"

* "What are you going to give the reader to think about at the end?"

  • Invite students to draft their concluding paragraph using their verbal rehearsal and the notes on the chart paper.
  • Again circulate to assist students in drafting their concluding paragraphs. Ask:

* "How can you summarize the main ideas?"

* "How did the author conclude the model argument essay?"

* "What are you going to give the reader to think about at the end?"

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Self-Assessment against the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (5 minutes)

  • Distribute NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (Rows 1 and 3). Tell students that they have already seen the whole rubric and these are the two rows that apply to the introductory and concluding paragraphs.
  • Invite students to read the Criteria column and Column 3 with you.
  • Distribute the new Self-Assessment: NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (Rows 1 and 3). Tell students that they are going to score the introductory and concluding paragraphs of the draft essay against the rubric--Row 1 of the rubric is about the introductory paragraph and Row 3 is about the concluding paragraph. Tell students to underline on the rubric where their essay fits best. They are then to justify how they have scored themselves using evidence from their essay on the lines underneath.
  • Remind students to be honest when self-assessing because identifying where there are problems with their work will help them to improve.
  • Circulate to ask questions and encourage students to think carefully about their scoring choices:

*       "You have underlined this part of your rubric. Why? Where is the evidence in your essay to support this?"

  • Students who finish quickly can begin to revise their draft essays based on their scoring against the rubric.
  • Tell students that now that they have finished the introductory and concluding paragraphs of their essays, they have now completed the first draft of their essay for their end of unit assessment. Make it clear that they will revise their essay once they have received feedback for their final performance task of the module.
  • Collect the first drafts and the self-assessments.
  • Students who have not finished will benefit from being able to take their essay home to finish the first draft.
  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all learners, but research shows it supports struggling learners most.

Homework

Homework
  • Continue independent reading. Select five words that grabbed your attention and describe what it is about each of those words that caught your eye.

Note: Be prepared to provide students with feedback in Lesson 9 using Row 2 of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric about use of evidence. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for each student to revise (step).

Students will need their draft essays for peer critique in Lesson 8, but these drafts should be collected again at the end of that lesson to continue assessing.

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