End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Drafting Body Paragraphs of an Essay to Inform | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L6

End of Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Drafting Body Paragraphs of an Essay to Inform

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of an informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • I can use evidence from a variety of grade-appropriate texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. (W.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how a topic is developed in each body paragraph of the model essay.
  • I can draft the body paragraphs of my essay to inform. 

Ongoing Assessment

  • Draft of essay to inform
  • Self-assessment against Rows 1 and 2 of NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A.  Reviewing the Rubric (5 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Studying the Model Essay: Analyzing the Development of Ideas in a Body Paragraph (10 minutes)

     B. Independent Writing: Drafting the Body Paragraphs (23 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Self-Assessment against the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. If needed, complete your body paragraphs at home.

  • In this lesson, students draft the body paragraphs for their End of Unit Assessment "My Rule to Live By" essay to inform. They revisit the model and the rule sandwich used in Unit 2 to get a firm grounding in how to explain the evidence.
  • By the end of this lesson, students should have finished their body paragraphs of their draft essay to inform for their end of unit assessment.
  • Those students who have not finished their draft by the end of this lesson will benefit from taking it home to finish it for homework. In Lesson 7, students will draft their introduction and conclusion paragraphs.
  • Be prepared to provide students with feedback in Lesson 9 using Row 2 of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for each student to revise (step).
  • If possible, provide access to computers for students to write their draft of their body paragraphs.
  • Post: Learning targets; Structure and Content of an Essay to Inform anchor chart (from Lesson 5).
  • In advance: Determine what technology you will use to display the Analysis of the Body Paragraph form. In Work Time Part A, students tell you what color to use to highlight some of the sentences in the second paragraph on that form.
  • Determine whether you need to acquire yellow and green markers, highlighters, or dry erase pens.
  • On the Analysis of the Body Paragraph for display, before showing it to the students, highlight the text according to the colors in parentheses in front of each sentence.

Vocabulary

None

Materials

  • NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (one per student)
  • Structure and Content of an Informative Essay anchor chart (new; co-constructed with students during Work Time B)
  • Document Camera
  • End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt: Draft of Essay to Inform: "My Rules to Live By" (based on Performance Task Prompt distributed in Unit 2, Lesson 15; one per student)
  • Analysis of the Body Paragraph (one for display)
  • Outline for "My Rule to Live By" Essay (from Lesson 5)
  • Self-Assessment: NYS Writing Rubric (Rows 1 and 2) (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing the Rubric (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric and display it using a document camera.
  • Direct students to silently read the rubric.
  • Ask them to put a question mark next to any section they don't fully understand in Row 1 and Row 2. Explain that this is the same rubric that was used in Module 1 and is very similar to the argument rubric used in Unit 2.
  • Explain that you are going to only discuss Rows 1 and 2 for the opening today.
  • Ask a volunteer:

* "Where will you write about your analysis of the research texts in your essay (Row 1)?"

  • Listen for a student to say in the body paragraphs.
  • Ask a volunteer:

* "Where will you develop the ideas of your essay (Row 2)?"

  • Listen for a student to say in the body paragraphs.
  • Ask students to keep their rubric, as they will need it for a self-assessment during closing.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Ask a student to read the learning targets aloud while the other students follow along:

* "I can analyze how a topic is developed in each body paragraph of the model essay."

* "I can draft the body paragraphs of my essay to inform."

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "How is a topic developed in the body paragraphs? Refer to the work we did in the previous lesson about your topic and supporting evidence."

  • Refocus whole class and call on a volunteer. Listen for them to say something like: "You use the evidence to explain more about the topic and how it supports your rule."
  • Direct students' attention to the fact that this is the last bullet on the Structure and Content of an Essay to Inform anchor chart. Reassure students that this will be the focus of Work Time Part A.
  • Posting learning targets and anchor charts allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Studying the Model Essay: Analyzing the Development of Ideas in a Body Paragraph (10 minutes)

  • Display the Analysis of the Body Paragraph. Tell students you highlighted different parts of a body paragraph from your essay on the importance of reading.
  • Explain that each color is a different way of developing the ideas of the essay.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "Describe how each color helps develop the ideas of the essay. Use language from the outline to help you describe this."

  • Refocus whole class. Cold call on a pair to share how the yellow highlighting develops the ideas of the essay.
  • Listen for and guide students to say: "This is where the rule of reading is connected to the topic of higher achievement."
  • Write: "Rule connected to the topic" on the line next to the yellow box.
  • Next, cold call on a pair of students to share how the blue highlighting develops the ideas of the essay.
  • Listen for and guide students to say: "This is where evidence is shared to support the topic of higher achievement."
  • Write: "Evidence to support the topic" on the line next to the blue box.
  • Next, cold call on a pair to share how the green highlighting develops the ideas of the essay.
  • Listen for and guide students to say: "This is where you explain the evidence and the topic in your words."
  • Write: "Explain the evidence and the topic in your words" on the line next to the green box.
  • Direct students' attention to the sentence that includes "(Scholastic: Classroom Libraries Work!)." Explain that this is the article where the evidence for the topic came from. Tell students you should include at least one source for each new piece of information used.
  • Direct students to the display of the Analysis of the Body Paragraph again. Explain that the next paragraph is already highlighted in blue because that is the data used from the research articles.
  • Cold call on a student and ask:

* "What source is cited in this paragraph?"

  • Listen for: "The Power of Reading: Reading and Freedom."
  • Add to the Structure and Content of an Informative Essay anchor chart:
    • Cite a source for each new piece of information you use.
    • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

*  "Determine which lines you would highlight yellow and green in this paragraph. Be prepared to explain why."

  • Circulate and support students by suggesting they look for a similar pattern to the other paragraph.
  • Refocus whole class. Cold call on a pair of students to share what sentences they would highlight in yellow. Either highlight or circle the sentences in yellow, which should be:
    And last, but not least, one of the most significant benefits to reading every day is that reading gives you freedom of mind.
  • Check for understanding by asking the rest of the class for thumbs-up or thumbs-down if they agree. Address any students who have thumbs-down. Refer back to the yellow box statement where the rule is connected to the topic.
  • Cold call on a different pair of students to share what sentences they would highlight in green. Either highlight or circle the sentences in green, which should be:
    They check facts, learn how to fix things, understand their community better, and discover new ideas. 
    Readers have the freedom to seek information and make their own decisions.
  • Again, check for understanding by asking the rest of the class for thumbs-up or thumbs-down if they agree. Address any students who have thumbs-down. Refer back to the green box statement that says: "Explain the evidence and the topic in your words."
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.

B. Independent Writing: Drafting the Body Paragraphs (23 minutes)

  • Display the End of Unit 3 Assessment Prompt: Draft of Essay to Inform: "My Rules to Live By". Point out to students that this assessment prompt is almost identical to the performance task prompt they looked at together in Unit 2 (Lesson 15). Explain that today, they will write their best independent draft as a check point on the way toward that final performance task.
  • Direct students to retrieve their own completed Outline Form for "My Rule to Live By" Essay from Lesson 5 to use for writing their body paragraphs.
  • Remind students of the expectations for quiet writing time. Explain that talking is a great way to learn, and so is quiet, focused writing. They have had several lessons to talk with each other about their rules and their research; today's focus is to work independently.
  • Explain that students will write the introduction and conclusion in Lesson 7. Tell students to use their outline and the anchor chart as they draft all three body paragraphs. This is their end of unit assessment.
  • Circulate to assist students in drafting their body paragraphs. Ask:

* "How is your rule connected to your topic?"

* "How does your evidence explain your topic?"

* "What are you explaining in your own words?"

* "What specific evidence are you going to cite in the paragraph?"

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Self-Assessment against the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to retrieve their copy of the NYS Expository Evaluation Writing Rubric. Tell students that they are going to score the body paragraphs of the draft essay against the rubric--Row 1 of the rubric is about their analysis of their research texts, and Row 2 is about the development of ideas in each paragraph. Tell students to underline on the rubric where their essay fits best. They are then to justify how they have scored themselves using evidence from their essay on the lines underneath.
  • Focus students on the Self-Assessment: NYS Expository Evaluation Writing Rubric (rows 1 and 2). Remind students to be honest when self-assessing because identifying where there are problems with their work will help them improve.
  • Circulate to ask questions to encourage students to think carefully about their scoring choices:

* "You have underlined this part of your rubric. Why? Where is the evidence in your essay to support this?"

  • Students who finish quickly can begin revising their draft essays based on their scoring against the rubric.
  • Collect the first drafts and the self-assessments.
  • Students who have not finished will benefit from being able to take their essay home to finish the first draft.
  • Developing self-assessment and reflection supports all learners, but research shows it supports struggling learners most.

Homework

Homework
  • If needed, complete your body paragraphs at home.

Teaching Note: Be prepared to provide students with feedback in Lesson 9 using Row 2 of the NYS Expository Writing Evaluation Rubric about the use of evidence. Provide specific positive feedback for at least one thing each student did well (star) and at least one specific area of focus for each student to revise (step).

Students will need their draft essays for peer critique in Lesson 8, but these should be collected again at the end of that lesson to continue assessing.

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