Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Summarizing, Analyzing and Discussing Research | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L3

Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Summarizing, Analyzing and Discussing Research

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of an informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can refocus or refine my question when appropriate. (W.6.7)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.6.1)
  • I can express my own ideas clearly during discussions. (SL.6.1)
  • I can build on other's ideas during discussions. (SL.6.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of informational texts.
  • I can identify details relevant to my research question in an informational text.
  • I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background than me.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Researcher's notebook
  • Whole Class Discussion Tracker for focused discussion
  • Exit Ticket: My Stars and Steps for Focused Discussion

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A.  Research: Reading Text for Gist and Identifying Details Relevant to Research Question (18 minutes)

     B. Focused Discussion: Should Our "Rules to Live By" Be Personal Choice or Made into a Law? Round 1 (19 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A.  Exit Ticket: My Stars and Steps for Focused Discussion (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Continue your independent reading novel at home. In the next lesson, be prepared to share a brief summary of your novel.

  • In this lesson, students continue reading articles and completing their Researcher's Notebook. This is the last lesson where students will conduct research on their topic. Lesson 4 is the mid-unit assessment and in Lesson 5, students begin drafting their final essay for Unit 3.
  • In the Researcher's Notebook, students are asked to write a summary of the text. Students may need additional modeling, time, and support to do this successfully.
  • Collect the Researcher's Notebook at the end of this lesson and assess students you did not assess after Lesson 2. Again, you are not collecting notebooks for descriptive feedback, but to assess who needs more time for research in the next lesson.
  • In Work Time Part B, begin Round 1 of the speaking and listening mid-unit oral assessment. The prompt for focused discussion, "Should Our 'Rules to Live By' be Personal Choice or Made into a Law?" is specifically geared to engage students in a value-based conversation. The purpose is to assess the Speaking and Listening Standard 6.1e.
  • All students participate in discussion both days. Assess half of the students in Round 1 and the other half of the students in Round 2 (Lesson 4). Since this is an assessment, silently listen and observe the conversations, rather than provide feedback.
  • In closing, students complete Round 1 of the Focused Discussion Self-Assessment exit ticket. The purpose for this exit ticket is twofold: one, to engage students in self-reflection, and two, to provide a place for written feedback based on the formal assessments during the discussion. Students will have discussions in future modules and descriptive feedback on their strengths and growth areas is important to their continued success with group discussions.
  • Students will use this self-assessment exit ticket in both Round 1 and Round 2.
  • Post: Learning targets; Effective Discussion Language anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 15).
  • In advance: Pair up two research teams for a larger focused discussion. They will stay matched for this lesson and Lesson 4.
  • Make enough copies of the Whole Class Discussion Tracker to assess all students. Two students can be assessed per page.

Vocabulary

respectful, productive

Materials

  • Research folders (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Research task card (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Researcher's Notebook (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Colored pencils (one per student)
  • Whole Class Discussion Tracker (one to display)
  • Effective Discussion Language anchor chart (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Discussion Prompt (one per student)
  • Exit Ticket: My Stars and Steps for Focused Discussion (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Explain to students that the mid-unit assessment is broken into two parts: a writing section and the focus discussion section that they began in Lesson 3.
  • Invite students to read the first three learning targets with you:

*  "I can summarize an article on the importance of reading."

*  "I can explain how text evidence supports the claim about the importance of reading."

*  "I can refocus or refine a research question when appropriate."

  • Explain that these are the targets for the written section and that students have been doing all of this for their own topic in their Researcher's Notebook for the past five lessons. 
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Refer students to the glossary for each of the texts in the research folders to help them understand unfamiliar words.
  • Providing students with task cards ensures that expectations are consistently available.
  • Encourage students to choose a text from the research folder that is most appropriate for their reading level--encourage students to challenge themselves within reason.

Work Time

Work Time

A. Research: Reading Text for Gist and Identifying Details Relevant to Research Question (18 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they were to read another informational text from their research folder to familiarize themselves with it before using it for researching in this lesson.
  • Focus students on Part A, 5 and 6 of the research task card. Tell students to follow 5 and 6 to annotate their text for the gist and to record the relevant information on their Researcher's Notebook. Give students a few minutes to complete this step.
  • Refocus the whole group. Focus student attention on Part B of the task card: Rereading for Details Relevant to Your Research Question. Remind students that they did this in the previous lesson.
  • Ask students to follow the Part B directions to identify and underline in colored pencil the details relevant to their research question and to use the details they have underlined to write a summary.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading to identify the details relevant to helping them answer their question and in writing a summary of those details. Give students several minutes to complete this step.
  • Collect students' Researcher's Notebooks to assess if there are students who will need more time for research.

B. Focused Discussion: Should Our "Rules to Live By" Be Personal Choice or Made into Laws? Round 1 
 (19 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the last learning target with you:

* "I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background from me."

  • Ask a volunteer:

*  "Who can remind us again how we have respectful conversations?"

  • Listen for and guide the student to explain that you have a nice tone of voice and you are trying to understand where someone else is coming from.

* "How do we have productive conversations?"

  • Listen for and guide the student to share that being productive means acknowledging the other person's point of view by paraphrasing, asking a question, and explaining why you agree or disagree politely.
  • Explain that the focused discussion today is the start to the mid-unit oral assessment. During the discussion in this lesson and in the next lesson the students will be formally assessed on their ability to speak and listen to each other.
  • Remind them of the speaking and listening target they have been working toward: "I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background from me."
  • Display the Whole Class Discussion Tracker for students to see what you will be using to assess them with as you listen to conversations.
  • Review the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart by reading it out loud. Encourage students to follow their norms and to use the sentence stems written on the anchor chart (from Lesson 1). Remind students that when people disagree in a conversation, it can be challenging. Being respectful and productive are keys to success in the conversation.
  • Ask if students have any questions about this assessment and clarify as needed.
  • Direct students to get into their research teams. Tell students that while in previous lessons they have been doing smaller group discussions within their teams, now they are going to have a larger group discussion by working with another team. Pair up two teams and tell them where to circle up for their focused discussion.
  • Once students are seated, display the Mid-Unit 3 Assessment, Part 1: Discussion Prompt.
  • Tell students that this question is referring to their rules about bullying, the environment, and healthy habits. The question is asking if the rules the students wrote about should be laws, which people are forced to follow (e.g., laws about exercise and healthy food, laws about bullying, laws about recycling), or if these rules should be left to people's individual choices. Process this question with students to answer any questions they may have about its meaning, and to clarify any misconceptions.
  • Circulate and listen to students. Use the Whole Class Discussion Tracker to assess students as you listen closely to students' conversations. Do not confer or provide feedback at this time, as it is an assessment for students. Feedback will come during debrief and post-assessment. Consider scripting or paraphrasing a short question or response from each student that you can use as evidence in your feedback to students.
  • Once students are finished, direct students to return to their own seats for closing.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: My Stars and Steps for Focused Discussion (3 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: My Stars and Steps for Focused Discussion.
  • Invite students to review the criteria listed at the top and reflect on their own participation in today's discussion.
  • Direct students to complete the Round 1 portion of the exit ticket.
  • For example, you might write: "My star is paraphrasing what someone else said. My step is posing probing questions."
  • Collect the exit tickets when students are done. They will need them in the next lesson. Consider writing feedback, one star and one step, to students based on your assessment of their discussions. 
  • Using entrance/exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • Continue your independent reading book at home. In the next lesson, be prepared to share a brief summary of your book so far.

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