Researching Part 2: Reading for Gist and Gathering Evidence Using the Research Guide | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L2

Researching Part 2: Reading for Gist and Gathering Evidence Using the Research Guide

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of an informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can pose questions that help me clarify what is being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can pose questions that elaborate on the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can respond to questions with elaboration and detail that connect with the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • After a discussion, I can paraphrase what I understand about the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1d)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of informational texts.
  • I can identify the main points in an informational text.
  • I can identify details relevant to my research question in an informational text.
  • I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background than me.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Entrance ticket: Step Back and See the Big Picture
  • Researcher's notebook
  • Exit ticket: What Did You Learn in Your Focused Discussion Today?

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

      A. Entrance Ticket: Step Back and See the Big Picture (5 minutes)

      B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Research: Reading Text for Gist and to Identify Details Relevant to Research Question (18 minutes)

     B. Focused Discussion (10 minutes)

     C. Teacher Feedback (5 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

      A. Refining the Question (5 minutes)

4.      Homework

     A. Finish revising your question on your Researcher's Notebook if necessary.

     B. Choose another text from your research folder that you think is relevant to your research question. Read it to familiarize yourself with it and be ready to use it to research in the next lesson.

  • It is important that students have a general sense of each article in their research folder before they begin researching so that they can choose a text that is relevant to answering their research question. Students use a colored pencil to underline the details that are relevant to their research question.
  • In the Researcher's Notebook, students are asked to write a summary of the text. Students may need additional modeling, time, and support to do this successfully.
  • Be sure students have their structured notes from Units 1 and 2 about the rules in Bud, Not Buddy.
  • Post: Learning targets; list of research teams (from Unit 2, Lesson 16).

Vocabulary

gist, respectfully, productive; see the glossary in each research folder for vocabulary for each of the informational texts

Materials

  • Entrance ticket: Step Back and See the Big Picture (one per student)
  • Research folders (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Research task card (from Lesson 1; one per student)
  • Researcher's Notebook (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Colored pencils (one per student)
  • Discussion Tracker (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Effective Discussion Language anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 20)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entrance Ticket: Step Back and See the Big Picture (5 minutes)

  • Distribute entrance ticket: Step Back and See the Big Picture.
  • Ask students to take a couple of minutes to consider the following questions:

*  "What have you learned about your research question so far?"

* "What more do you need to find out about your topic?"

  • Invite students to answer the questions on their entrance tickets.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Be sure students are sitting with their teams.
  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can find the gist of informational texts."

* "I can summarize an informational text."

* "I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background than me."

  • Students should be quite familiar with the term gist. Cold call a student to remind the class what it means. Listen for: "Getting an initial sense of what a text is mostly about."
  • Remind students of what respectful and productive mean in discussions. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Research: Reading Text for Gist and to Identify Details Relevant to Research Question (18 minutes)

  • Remind students that for homework they were to read another informational text from their research folders to familiarize themselves with it before researching in this lesson.
  • Focus students on Part A, 5 and 6 of the research task card. Tell students to follow 5 and 6 to annotate their text for the gist and to record the relevant information on their Researcher's Notebook.
  • Refocus the whole group. Focus students' attention on Part B of the task card: Rereading for Details Relevant to Your Research Question. Remind students that they did this in the previous lesson.
  • Ask students to follow the Part B directions to identify and underline in colored pencil the details relevant to their research question and to use the details they have underlined to write a summary.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading to identify the details relevant to helping them answer their question and in writing a summary of those details.
  • Refer students to the glossary for each of the texts in the research folders to help them understand unfamiliar words.
  • Providing students with task cards ensures that expectations are consistently available.
  • Encourage students to choose a text from the research folder that is most appropriate for their reading level--encourage students to challenge themselves within reason.

B. Focused Discussion (10 minutes)

  • Display the Discussion Tracker and the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart.
  • Tell students that they are going to practice all these skills in a discussion about a focus question that you give to them. Remind them that to have an effective discussion, they should focus on the criteria on the Discussion Tracker and the language they have recorded on the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart.
  • Give students the focus question:

* "Which of Bud's rules would you use yourself? Why?"

  • Give students a couple of minutes to refer to their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer from previous units and to think about the question.
  • Invite research teams to discuss the focus question. Circulate to listen to observe students and to provide feedback against the criteria on the Discussion Tracker. Encourage students to use the language on the anchor charts to be respectful.

C. Teacher Feedback (5 minutes)

  • Provide feedback to the whole group using the Discussion Tracker as a guide based on the patterns you saw in the research team discussions. For example: "I noticed that not many of you are asking questions to encourage other people to elaborate because you want to share your own ideas first. It is great that you want to share your ideas, but remember to question others to find out more, so that you can help them to clarify their thoughts and further their ideas."

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Refining the Question (5 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the part of the Researcher's Notebook that asks whether the text they dug into during this lesson made them want to revise or refine their research question.
  • Ask students questions to guide their thinking:

* "Did your research today reveal anything unexpected about your research question? Did it reveal a new rule to live by that you hadn't considered?"

* "Did you see something in your research today that made you want to go down a different route with your research and your possible rule to live by?"

* "Did your research today make you realize that you need to focus your question more because it is too broad?"

  • Give students a couple of minutes to think before inviting them to record their thinking in their Researcher's Notebook. Emphasize that they don't have to revise or refine their question if they don't think it is necessary at this stage.
  • Guiding questions can help students determine whether they need to refine their question or not. Consider posting these questions for students to refer to during thinking time.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish revising your question on your Researcher's Notebook if necessary.
  •  Choose another text from your research folder that you think is relevant to your research question. Read it to familiarize yourself with it and be ready to use it to research in the next lesson.

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