Researching Part 1: Reading for Gist and Gathering Evidence Using the Researcher’s Notebook | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U3:L1

Researching Part 1: Reading for Gist and Gathering Evidence Using the Researcher’s Notebook

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of an informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can summarize an informational text using only information from the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can pose questions that help me clarify what is being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can pose questions that elaborate on the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • I can respond to questions with elaboration and detail that connect with the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1c)
  • After a discussion, I can paraphrase what I understand about the topic being discussed. (SL.6.1d)

Supporting Targets

  • I can find the gist of informational texts.
  • I can identify the main points in an informational text.
  • I can identify details relevant to my research question in an informational text.
  • I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background than me.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Researcher's notebook

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

      A. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

      B.  Becoming Familiar with the Researcher's Notebook (6 minutes)

2.  Work Time

      A.  Reading All Research Texts for Gist (12 minutes)

      B. Reading One Research Text to Identify Details Relevant to Research Question (10 minutes)

      C.  Focused Discussion (9 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Refining the Question (4 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Finish revising your question on your Researcher's Notebook if necessary.

     B. Choose another text from your research folder that you think is relevant to your research question. Read it to familiarize yourself with it and be ready to use it to research in the next lesson.

  • Although this is the first official lesson of Unit 3, students began preparing for the research portion of this unit in Lessons 15 and 16 of Unit 2.
  • It is important that students have a general sense of each article in their research folder before they begin researching so that they can choose a text that is relevant to answering their research question. Students use a colored pencil to underline the details that are relevant to their research question.
  • In the Researcher's Notebook, students are asked to write a summary of the text. Students may need additional modeling, time, and support to do this successfully.
  • In advance: prepare one copy of "Make Your Move" from the healthy habits research folder to display during Work Time A. Select three students to be in the middle of the fishbowl. Give them a role (Student 1, 2, or 3) and a copy of the script in advance and ask them to read through the script to become familiar with their part.
  • Post: Learning targets; list of research teams (from Unit 2, Lesson 16).

Vocabulary

gist, respectfully, productive; see the glossary in each research folder for vocabulary for each of the informational texts

Materials

  • List of research teams (new; teacher-created based on teams formed in Unit 2, Lesson 16)
  • Researcher's Notebook (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Research task card (one per student)
  • "Make Your Move" (from "Healthy Habits" research folder; one to display)
  • Research folders (from Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Document camera
  • Colored pencils (one per student)
  • Discussion Tracker (from Unit 2, Lesson 15; one per student)
  • Fishbowl Script 2 (one per student and one to display)
  • Effective Discussion Language anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 15)
  • Steve Jobs' Rules to Live By (one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (4 minutes)

  • Be sure students are sitting with their teams as listed on the List of research teams.
  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can find the gist of informational texts."

* "I can summarize an informational text."

* "I can respectfully have productive discussions with peers who have a different perspective and background than I do."

  • Students should be quite familiar with the term gist. Cold call a student to remind the class what it means. Listen for: "Getting an initial sense of what a text is mostly about."
  • Explain to students that real researchers read a lot of texts and need to be able to do a first read just to get a basic sense of the text and determine whether it is "trash or treasure," which means whether or not the text is relevant to their research questions.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What does respectfully mean in a discussion?"

  • Cold call students to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that respectfully means listening to other people when they are speaking; trying to see their point of view and understand their perspective, even when it is different to theirs; and trying to understand how the varying backgrounds, cultures, and experiences of others can have an impact on their ideas.

* What does productive mean in a discussion?"

  • Select volunteers to share their responses. Listen for students to explain that productive means participants in the discussion can move forward in their thinking by being asked questions that encourage them to clarify their ideas and elaborate on their ideas.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The learning targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

B. Becoming Familiar with the Researcher's Notebook (6 minutes)

  • Ask students to refer to their Researcher's Notebook, with which they familiarized themselves for homework in Unit 2, Lesson 15. Invite students to reread the headings of the columns and rows. Ask students to discuss in teams:

* "What do you notice?"

* "What do you wonder?"

  • Select volunteers to share their team discussion with the whole group.
  • Ask students to discuss in teams:

* "So what information will go in the left column? Why is it important to read this information?"

* "What about the right column? Why is it important to record this information?"

  • Listen for students to use the prompts and questions in the columns to explain what they need to record in each column. Listen also for students to explain that this information is important because they need to gather enough information from the text to be able to see quickly what it is about without having to read the whole thing again.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading All Research Texts for Gist (12 minutes)

  • Distribute research task cards. Focus students on Part A: Reading for Gist. Read the directions aloud as students read silently in their heads.
  • Emphasize that reading for gist is something real researchers do. Use a healthy habits research folder and model following the directions on the task card with the "Make Your Move" informational text. However, only model finding the gist of one paragraph to save time. Using a document camera, display a Researcher's Notebook and model how to fill it out using this article, as the task card suggests.
  • Invite students to read the informational texts in their research folders for gist.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading.
  • Refer students to the glossary for each of the texts in the research folders to help them understand unfamiliar words.
  • Providing students with task cards ensures that expectations are consistently available.
  • Encourage students to choose a text from the research folder that is most appropriate for their reading level--encourage students to challenge themselves within reason.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.

B. Reading One Research Text to Identify Details Relevant to Research Question (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have gotten a sense of the gist of the various texts in their folders, they will choose a text that seems like it might be relevant to helping them answer their research question to read in more detail.
  • Focus students on Part B of the task card: Rereading for Details Relevant to Your Research Question. Answer clarifying questions as needed.
  • Remind students of the research question you chose in Unit 2, Lesson 16:

* How often do I need to exercise to stay healthy? Why?

  • Display the "Make Your Move" informational text from the healthy habits research folder. Write the research question at the top. Follow the directions on the task card to model for students how to underline the first two pages of the text as the task card directs. In the first two pages of this article, there are not actually many details that are relevant to the question. This is a good learning experience for students, as they may find the same with some of the informational texts in their research folders. Research details to underline:

*  At least 30 minutes of cardio should be an important part of your daily routine.

  • Ask students to follow the Part B directions to identify and underline in colored pencil the details relevant to their research question. Ask students not to write their summary yet, as they will discuss that as a whole group first.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading to identify the details relevant to helping them answer their question.
  • Refocus the whole group. Point to the section on the Researcher's Notebook that asks for a "Summary of the text" and the final step on the task card. Ask students:

* "What is a summary?"

  • Listen for students to explain that a summary is a brief outline of the main points of a text.
  • Remind students that they have already underlined the details relevant to their research question in their informational text. Use the informational text you underlined earlier as a model to guide students in how to use the details you underlined to write a summary. For example:

* You need to do at least 30 minutes of cardio per day.

  • Invite students to write a summary of the details relevant to their research question in the text they read.

C. Focused Discussion (9 minutes)

  • Display the Discussion Tracker and remind students that they first saw this in Unit 2, Lesson 15 when they practiced the first five of the skills on the Discussion Tracker.
  • Focus students' attention on the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart and remind them of the criteria and language that will help them have a productive discussion and achieve the first five skills on the Discussion Tracker.
  • Focus students on the final three criteria of the Discussion Tracker and invite them to read them with you:

*           Seeks out different peer perspectives and backgrounds

*           Acknowledges different peer perspectives and backgrounds

*   Respectfully compares own perspective with someone else

  • Remind students of the word "respectfully" in the learning target and explain that these three criteria help to assess how respectful students are being in a discussion.
  • Invite the four students who have prepared for the fishbowl discussion to sit in the fishbowl and all of the other students to sit around them. Ensure they have their copies of the script.
  • Tell the students on the outside to focus on how students are respectful of different perspectives in the fishbowl. Ask students in the fishbowl to follow the script to have a discussion.
  • At the end of the fishbowl ask students on both the inside and the outside of this fishbowl to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

* "What did you notice about how students were respectful in this discussion?"

  • Select students to share their notices with the class.
  • Display and distribute the Fishbowl Script 2. Invite students to spend a couple of minutes reading it. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "How are the listeners respectful?"

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*  "What language do the listeners use to seek out, acknowledge, and compare perspectives?"

* "What other language could you use to make it clear to the speaker that you are asking a question?"

  • Record student ideas on the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart. Ensure the following are included:

*           Why is this important to you ...

*           I hear that (insert person's background experience/beliefs) is really important to you ...

*           I disagree/agree because ...

*           How does that connect with your research?

Another point of view is ...
*       Have you considered ...
*       I wonder if something in your past or your beliefs are leading you to think ...

  • Tell students that now they are going to apply what they learned from the fishbowl to have their own discussion in research teams about a focus question that you are going to give them. Remind them that to have an effective discussion, they should focus on the criteria on the Discussion Tracker and the language they have recorded on the Effective Discussion Language anchor chart.
  • Give students the focus question:

* "Which of Steve Jobs' rules to live by resonates with you? Why?"

  • Post Steve Jobs' Rules to Live By for all students to see:
    *           You have to trust in something--your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. 
    *           Sometimes life hits you in the head with a brick. Don't lose faith.
    *           You've got to find what you love.
    *           Your time is limited, so don't waste it living someone else's life. 
    *           Don't be trapped by dogma--which is living with the results of other people's thinking.
    *           Don't let the noise of others' opinions drown out your own inner voice.
    *           Have the courage to follow your heart and intuition.
  • Give students a couple of minutes to think about the question.
  • Invite research teams to discuss the focus question. Circulate to listen and observe students and to provide feedback against the criteria on the Discussion Tracker. Encourage students to use the language on the anchor charts to be respectful.

Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "Which of the skills on the Discussion Tracker would you mark off from the conversation you just heard?"

  • Listen for students to say they could mark off the final three on the list.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Refining the Question (4 minutes)

  • Focus students' attention on the part of the Researcher's Notebook that asks whether the text they dug into during this lesson made them want to revise or refine their research question.
  • Ask students questions to guide their thinking:

* "Did your research today reveal anything unexpected about your research question? Did it reveal a new rule to live by that you hadn't considered?"

*  "Did you see something in your research today that made you want to go down a different route with your research and your possible rule to live by?"

* "Did your research today make you realize that you need to focus your question more because it is too broad?"

  • Give students a couple of minutes to think before inviting them to record their thinking on their Researcher's Notebook. Emphasize that they don't have to revise or refine their question if they don't think it is necessary at this stage.
  • Guiding questions can help students determine whether they need to refine their question or not. Consider posting these questions for students to refer to during thinking time.

Homework

Homework
  • Finish revising your question on your Researchers Notebook if necessary.
  • Choose another text from your research folder that you think is relevant to your research question. Read it to familiarize yourself with it and be ready to use it to research in the next lesson.

Note: For Lesson 2, students will need their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer from Units 1 and 2. Remind students to bring them or, if you collected them, be prepared to pass them back.

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