Looking Closely at Stanza 1—Identifying Rules to Live By Communicated in “If” | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U2:L3

Looking Closely at Stanza 1—Identifying Rules to Live By Communicated in “If”

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can compare and contrast how different genres communicate the same theme or idea. (RL.6.9)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can describe the literal meaning of figurative language in the poem "If."
  • I can paraphrase the first stanza of Rudyard Kipling's "If" poem.
  • I can identify rules to live by communicated in the first stanza of the poem "If."

Ongoing Assessment

  • The first stanza of "If" paraphrased on the Analyzing "If" graphic organizer
  • Exit ticket: Connecting "If" with Bud, Not Buddy

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 15 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

     A. Analyzing the Meaning of Excerpts of the First Stanza (15 minutes)

     B. Paraphrasing the First Stanza (5 minutes)

     C. Determining Rules to Live By in the First Stanza (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Exit Ticket: Connecting "If" with Bud, Not Buddy (5 minutes)

4. Homework

     A. Read Chapter 16 of Bud, Not Buddy. Use evidence flags to mark details in the chapter to answer this question: "How do the band members feel about Bud?"

  • This lesson is the second in the two-lesson cycle that will be repeated until students have read each stanza of the "If" poem closely. In this lesson, students dig deeper into the meaning of the first stanza, with teacher questioning using the close reading guide.
  • Students then determine rules to live by from the poem, discuss how those rules are communicated, and connect those rules to rules or themes in Bud, Not Buddy.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

figurative language, paraphrase

Materials

  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (from Lesson 1)
  • "If" (from Lesson 2)
  • Close Reading Guide - Stanza 1 of "If" by Rudyard Kipling (for Teacher Reference)
  • Analyzing "If" graphic organizer (from Lesson 2)
  • Equity sticks
  • Rules to Live By in "If" anchor chart (new; co-created with students in Work Time C)
  • Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts (five total; from Lesson 1)
  • Exit ticket: Connecting "If" with Bud, Not Buddy (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 15 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into triads. Remind them that for homework they were to read Chapter 15 of Bud, Not Buddy and to fill out their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer if they came across any of Bud's rules.
  • Ask students to refer to their graphic organizer and to discuss and compare with their triads what they recorded for Rule #28 in each column of their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer. Encourage students to add to their graphic organizer any new thinking about the rule that they learn from peers.
  • Circulate to listen in on triads to ensure all students are participating in the discussion and have completed their graphic organizer for homework.
  • Discussing the homework task from the previous lesson at the beginning of the lesson holds students accountable for doing their homework. It also gives you an opportunity to assess who is reading the novel at home and who isn't.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*  "I can describe the literal meaning of figurative language in the poem 'If.'"

* "I can paraphrase the first stanza of Rudyard Kipling's 'If' poem."

* "I can identify rules to live by communicated in the first stanza of the poem 'If.'"

  • Remind students of what figurative language is.
  • Ask students:

* "What does paraphrase mean?"

  • Cold call students to share their thinking. Remind students that paraphrase means to put it into their own words and that paraphrasing helps them to ensure that they understand the main ideas.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets for students allows them to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Meaning of Excerpts of the First Stanza (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that in the previous lesson, they read and listened to an audio version of Rudyard Kipling's poem "If." Remind them also that they began to look more closely at the first stanza of the poem with notices and wonders about different elements of the poem such as punctuation, word choice, and structure.
  • Use the Close Reading Guide--Stanza 1 of "If" by Rudyard Kipling (for Teacher Reference) to guide students through a series of questions about the meaning of excerpts from the first stanza of "If." Students discuss the answers to these questions in their triads and share with the whole class.
  • Questioning students about parts of the text encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and ultimately allows for a deeper understanding.
  • Guiding questions provide motivation for student engagement in the topic and give a purpose to reading a text closely.

B. Paraphrasing the First Stanza (5 minutes)

  • Tell students now that they have analyzed the words and phrases in the stanza more closely and have a deeper understanding of it, they are going to paraphrase the stanza.
  • Ask the class to get into triads to share their paraphrasing.
  • Remind students of the Paraphrased column on their Analyzing "If" graphic organizer from the previous lesson. Tell them to record their paraphrasing of the first stanza in that last column.
  • Use equity sticks to ask students to share their paraphrasing with the whole group.
  • Asking students to paraphrase the stanza helps you to check their understanding.

C. Determining Rules to Live By in the First Stanza (10 minutes)

  • Refocus the whole group. Give students a few minutes to reread the poem from start to finish. Ask students to discuss in triads:

* "So what is this poem mostly about?"

*  "How does the first stanza fit into the poem as a whole?"

  • Select volunteers to share their triad discussion with the whole group. Guide students toward the idea that the first stanza sets the pattern that the following stanzas repeat in terms of the rhythm and language they use.
  • Remind students that this module is all about rules to live by and that, as we have already seen, Bud has rules to live by, Steve Jobs suggested rules to live by, and in "If" Rudyard Kipling suggests rules to live by.
  • Tell students they should look closely at each "If" statement within the first stanza as well as the stanza as a whole. Ask students to discuss in their triads:

*  "What are some rules to live by that Rudyard Kipling gives us in the first stanza of the poem?"

  • Select volunteers to share their triad discussion with the whole group.
  • Record student suggestions on the Rules to Live By in "If" anchor chart. Suggestions could include:

*  Maintain control even when others are losing control.

*  Trust yourself even when others doubt you.

*  Don't hold a grudge against people when they doubt you.

*  Don't make time for lies--for lying or listening to the lies of others.

*  Don't hate people or worry about people who hate you.

*  Control your ego--don't boast or promote yourself too much.

*  Don't let others lead you off your path.

  • Ask students to discuss in their triads:

*  "How are those rules communicated?" 

  • Use equity sticks to invite students to share their triad discussion with the whole group.
  • Guide students toward the idea that Rudyard Kipling tells us the rules rather than suggests them and uses figurative language and "If" statements to make it poetic.
  • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Connecting "If" with Bud, Not Buddy (5 minutes)

  • Focus students on the five Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts from Lesson 1.
  • Distribute exit ticket: Connecting "If" with Bud, Not Buddy. Give students a minute or so to look at the charts to consider the question:

* "Which of the rules to live by in 'If' are similar to a rule or a theme in Bud, Not Buddy?"

  • Ask students to write their answer to the question on their exit ticket. 
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 16 of Bud, Not Buddy. Use evidence flags to mark details in the chapter to answer this question:

*  "How do the band members feel about Bud?"

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