Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs and Revising for Language | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U2:L13

Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs and Revising for Language

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)
  • I can accurately use sixth-grade academic vocabulary to express my ideas. (L.6.6)

Supporting Targets

  • I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay.
  • I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim about how Bud uses his rules.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Draft of body paragraphs
  • Writing with a Formal Style recording form

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Independent Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs of the Literary Argument Essay (20 minutes)

     B. Revising Word Choice: Maintaining a Formal Style (16 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Partner Writing: Reading Aloud a Revised Paragraph (6 minutes)

4.  Homework

    A. Complete the word choice revisions to your body paragraphs if you did not finish them in class.

  • This lesson asks students to draft their three body paragraphs based on the model essay, their planning documents, and the instruction provided in Lessons 11 and 12.
  • In Work Time Part B, the Guided Mini Lesson on Formal Style (see supporting materials) is a script of the think-aloud about how to revise for word choice. The excerpts from the Steve Jobs model essay are from an earlier draft of the model essay given to students in Lesson 9. The script highlights which revisions were made, as a model for revising word choice in an essay. The purpose of the mini lesson is to focus students on how to create a formal style in their writing by selecting precise and domain-specific vocabulary, which is also part of the Literary Argument Essay Rubric.
  • In the closing, students will not have time to provide feedback to each other. The purpose is to have students hear their own writing read aloud, which supports their revision process.
  • As a routine, when students are assigned independent reading for homework, the next lesson will open with time for students to review their independent reading.

Vocabulary

precise, domain-specific; synonym

Materials

  • Word-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Rule Sandwich Guide: Bud, Not Buddy (from Lesson 12)
  • Writing with a Formal Style recording form (one per student)
  • Thesauruses (available for student use as needed)
  • Guided Mini Lesson on Formal Style (for Teacher Reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Read aloud the learning targets for today:

*  "I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay."

*  "I can use precise and domain-specific language to formally argue my claim about how Bud uses his rules."

  • Ask:

*  "What does precise mean?"

  • Listen for: "Precise means to be exact and accurate."
  • Share an example with students and say:

*  "For example, the precise word for how I feel is 'furious,' not just mad. 'Furious' shows the precise degree to which I feel mad."

  • Ask:

*  "What might domain-specific language mean? Let me give you an example in context. To work as a biologist, you have to learn a lot of domain-specific words about biology. So, what do you think domain-specific language means?"

  • Listen for: "It means words used for a specific study or work."
  • Explain that in this essay, the domain-specific language is from the novel and writing techniques. For example, remind students that in Unit 1 they focused on the similes and metaphors used by the author to express his ideas. "Simile" is a domain-specific word that would fit in their essay. And while reading, they learned a lot about being orphaned during the Depression. Words such as "orphaned" and "Depression" are domain-specific to the novel.
  • Encourage students to refer to their word-catcher to help them use all their "impressive" vocabulary they have been learning along the way. 
  • Consider circling important words in the learning targets. Then annotate these words with their meaning to assist students' comprehension of the target. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Writing: Drafting Body Paragraphs of the Literary Argument Essay (20 minutes)

  • Direct students to retrieve their rule sandwiches from Lesson 12, as they will use these as well as the model essay to guide their paragraph writing.
  • Remind students that there are expectations for quiet writing time. Explain that talking is a great way to learn and share ideas; however, quiet, focused writing is also a great way to learn. They have had several lessons to talk about Bud's use of his rules, and today the focus is on working independently to draft a quality literary argument essay.
  • Explain that students will write the introduction and conclusion in Lesson 14. Their goal today is to write the three body paragraphs in a logical way, as reviewed in Lesson 12.
  • Ask:

*  "How are you feeling, fist to five, about your readiness to start writing on your own today? A five means you are ready and eager, a three means you might need help getting started, and a one means please confer with me first."

  • Make a note of students who have a one, two, or three. Circulate to those students first. Then continue conferring with students during this work time. Focus on how students are meeting the learning target "I can draft the body paragraphs of my literary argument essay" and how students are using the organizational structure of the rule sandwich to support their writing. Consider postponing feedback related to conventions and grammar. These writing skills will be instructed when students revise their early draft for a final draft in later lessons. 
  • The use of domain-specific vocabulary may be challenging for ELLs. Consider pairing these students with students for whom English is their first language to support them in the revision process. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Partner Writing: Reading Aloud a Revised Paragraph (6 minutes)

  • Direct students to work with their writing partner from Lesson 12. Ask them to take turns reading their body paragraphs out loud to each other. Have students decide who will be writer 1 and writer 2.
  • Invite writer 1 to begin first, reading one of their revised body paragraphs out loud to their partner. The writer is listening for logical order and formal style. Tell them to mark their own paragraph as they read aloud when the language and explanations are not clear or formal. This will help them know where to revise as a next step.
  • Have students continue alternating reading their body paragraphs to each other as time allows. 
  • Consider having select students hear their essay read aloud, as hearing their own writing may help them notice opportunities for revision of word choice or syntax.

Homework

Homework
  • Complete the word choice revisions to your body paragraphs if you did not finish them in class.

Note: Invite students to read their paragraphs out loud at home so they can hear whether the language and explanations sound clear and formal.

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