Pitching Your Claim with Best Evidence | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U2:L11

Pitching Your Claim with Best Evidence

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can argue my claim about Bud's rules using text evidence from the novel.
  • I can determine the best evidence to support my claim about Bud.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer
  • Exit Ticket: Survive or Thrive?

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

      A. Independent Reading Review (5 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Taking a Side: Does Bud Use His Rules to Survive or Thrive? (20 minutes)
     B. Evaluating Evidence: Choosing Best Evidence to Support a Claim (15 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment (2 minutes)

     A. Exit Ticket: Survive or Thrive?

4.  Homework

     A. If needed, finish making revisions to your Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer with your claim, your text evidence, and your explanation.

  • This lesson builds on the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer from Lesson 10. In this lesson, students refine and revise their supporting evidence.
  • In Work Time Part A, students will make arguments using the Taking Sides protocol. While you are listening to student arguments, write down a strong argument presented by each side. In Work Time Part B, display each argument as a model and explain to students what made it a strong argument.
  • In the Taking Sides protocol, students have the opportunity for oral practice. When they can explain something coherently, they are much closer to writing that idea down in a coherent way.
  • Use exit tickets to pair students who have similar claims into writing partnerships.
  • Review: Taking Sides protocol (see supporting materials).

Vocabulary

pitch (an idea)

Materials

  • Independent Reading Review recording form (one per student)
  • Qualities of a Strong Literary Argument Essay anchor chart (from Lesson 9)
  • How Did Bud Use His Rule? charts (From Lesson 10)
  • Bud, Not Buddy: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (from Lesson 10; extra copies optional)
  • Taking Sides Protocol (for Teacher Reference)
  • Exit Ticket: "Survive or Thrive?" (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Reading Review (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Independent Reading Review recording form. Ask students to think about the answer to the questions on the sheet: "What do you think of this book so far? How would you rate it on a scale from 0 (really dislike it) to 5 (really enjoying it)? Why?"
  • Invite students to score their opinion of the book so far and to justify why they give it that score on the Independent Reading Review recording form.
  • Collect the independent reviews. Have a discussion with students who scored their books 0-2 to determine whether they have given the book a fair chance. If appropriate, allow them to choose a new book and explain that sometimes books just don't work for us and we have to move on to different ones.
  • Students who cannot yet read independently at any level will benefit from hearing books read to them, either by a caregiver or through audio recordings. Hearing books/texts can be an ongoing assignment for these students.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (3 minutes)

  • Invite students to read along with you as you read the learning targets out loud:

* "I can argue my claim about Bud's rules using text evidence from the novel."

* "I can determine the best evidence to support my claim about Bud."

  • Ask:

* "So now that you have seen the learning targets for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today? Why?"

  • Listen for: "Choosing our evidence to support the 'survive' or 'thrive' claim and argue our ideas with each other."
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Taking a Side: Does Bud Use His Rules to Survive or Thrive? (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the Qualities of a Strong Literary Argument Essay anchor chart (from Lesson 9).
  • Remind students that the learning target for today says to argue their claim using text evidence. Explain that they are pitching their evidence.
  • Ask:

* "What does it mean to pitch your evidence, to pitch an idea?"

  • Listen for: "To pitch means to toss or to throw in baseball. In this case, it means to toss an idea to a person or group and try to convince them it's good."
  • Invite students to review the Bud, Not Buddy: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer they completed in Lesson 10 during the Gallery Walk.
  • Using a document camera, display and review the Taking Sides protocol.
  • Explain where students will go in the classroom if they claim survive and where to go if they claim thrive. Ask if there are any questions before beginning.
  • Begin the protocol, starting with Step 2a: Asking the focus question. Continue through each step of the protocol.
  • Listen for strong arguments made by students during the protocol. Write down a strong example made by both sides to use as a model later in this lesson.
  • Consider repeating rounds (Step e from the protocol) three or four times to ensure everyone has a chance for oral practice. You may allow students to regroup with their own side between each round to refine their explanation (argument). This would be a good time to provide descriptive feedback to each side such as: "I hear clear statements about one of Bud's rules and how he used the rule. I want you to think again about how text evidence proves Bud survived or thrived."
  • Refocus students whole group and have them return to their seats.
  • Use of protocols (like Taking a Side) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students to practice their speaking and listening skills.
  • Consider providing select students with materials ahead of time to read and prepare for this activity. 

B. Evaluating Evidence: Choosing Best Evidence to Support a Claim (15 minutes)

  • Ask for student volunteers to respond to the question:

* "What did you have to do to present a strong explanation in support of your claim?"

  • Listen for: "I had to use some of my own thinking and some of the text evidence about how Bud used or did not use his rule."
  • Review the second learning target again: "I can determine the best evidence to support my claim about Bud." Explain that this half of the lesson will focus on evaluating their evidence and revising their Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • Explain that not all text evidence is equal. Some evidence is stronger than other evidence.
  • Display the two arguments you wrote down during the Taking Sides protocol. Explain why these arguments were strong. Focus on these two points:
  • The way in which Bud used the rule was clearly connected to the claim.
  • There were detailed explanations as the evidence from the novel was explained in their own words.
  • Ask students to revisit the three rules and explanations on their Forming Evidence-Based Claims forms. Direct them to work independently on revising their arguments as needed by asking themselves two questions:

* "Can I clearly explain the connection between how Bud uses his rule and my claim?"

* "Can I explain my text evidence in my own words with enough detail to support my claim?"

  • Offer a new blank Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer to students who have several revisions to make on their graphic organizer. Remind students to revisit the How Did Bud Use His Rule? charts on the walls from Lesson 10 as a resource for revision or choosing new evidence as needed.
  • Circulate to check for understanding by observing their revisions. Consider circulating to students who did not participate in the Taking Sides discussion or students who struggled to articulate their arguments.
  • Provide feedback to students on determining their best evidence. As needed, ask students the two posted questions as you confer with them. Also, consider asking: "How did you determine that this was a strong piece of evidence?" Listen for students to make a clear and detailed explanation that connects how Bud used or did not use the rule and their claim. When students provide a clear explanation, encourage them to write their thinking in the Explain Your Thinking box on the graphic organizer. If students are unclear in their answer, suggest they revisit the novel and reread what happened after the rule to better understand how Bud used the rule. Suggest they consider whether the evidence supports their claim, and, if so, try to explain it to a friend or write it on the graphic organizer.
  • Refocus students whole group. Ask them to turn to their elbow partner and share what they determined were the best rules to support their claim and why. Explain that all of them will have a turn sharing their own evidence and listening to their partner. The purpose for this is to have students hear their own explanations for best evidence out loud after working silently; therefore, it is not a time for peer feedback.
  • Mixed-ability grouping of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text. Determine these groups ahead of time.
  • Use of protocols allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students to practice their speaking and listening skills.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Survive or Thrive? 

  • Distribute the Survive or Thrive? exit ticket. Ask students to complete the exit ticket.
  • Collect the exit ticket to plan writing partners for Lesson 12.
  • Using entrance/exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • If needed, finish making revisions to your Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer with your claim, your text evidence, and your explanation. 

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