Revisiting Bud’s Rules: Survive or Thrive? | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U2:L10

Revisiting Bud’s Rules: Survive or Thrive?

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. (W.6.1)
  • I can produce clear and coherent writing that is appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (W.6.4)
  • With support from peers and adults, I can use a writing process to produce clear and coherent writing. (W.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze how Bud used his rules: to survive or to thrive.
  • I can argue a claim using text evidence from the novel.

Ongoing Assessment

  • How Did Bud Use His Rule? charts
  • Bud, Not Buddy: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Discussion: Survive or Thrive? (5 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Finding Text Evidence: How Did Bud Use His Rules? (18 minutes)

     B.  Silent Gallery Walk: Weighing Evidence: Survive vs. Thrive (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

     A. Triads: What Do You Think about Bud's Rules Now? Thrive or Survive? (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Continue your independent reading. In Lesson 11, be prepared to explain what you think of your book so far.

  • In this lesson, students are introduced to and discuss the question about which they will be writing their essay: How does Bud use his rules: to survive or to thrive?
  • Lessons 10 and 11 launch students into the analysis and evaluation of the text evidence that best supports their claim. The graphic organizer and rule chart completed in this lesson will also be used in Lesson 11.
  • Students work with a Forming Evidence-based claims graphic organizer similar to one they used in Module 1.  This  graphic organizer is adapted in collaboration with Odell Education based on their Evidence-Based Claims worksheet (also see stand-alone document on EngageNY.org and odelleducation.com/resources).
  • Students will engage in group work to review one of Bud's rules and how he used it. One of the rules will be used for the class model, so the remaining 10 rules will be reviewed by students. The purpose of the Gallery Walk is for students to have a chance to review and analyze all the rules and make a claim about them.
  • The Gallery Walk is silent so students can have a quiet space as they read and think about each rule and analyze how best to use the text evidence. The Mix and Mingle is used in the middle of the Gallery Walk to give students time to vocalize their claim.
  • In advance: Cut Bud's Rule strips (see supporting materials); have the markers and chart paper ready for 10 groups.
  • Review Gallery Walk and Mix and Mingle protocols (Appendix 1)
  • If you have not already launched independent reading, do so before or during Lesson 10.  See Unit 2 Overview for details.

Vocabulary

argue

Materials

  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Document camera
  • End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: How Does Bud Use His Rules--To Survive or To Thrive? Argument Essay (from Lesson 9)
  • How Did Bud Use His Rule? model chart (for display)
  • Bud, Not Buddy (book, one per student)
  • Chart paper (one per triad)
  • Markers (one per triad)
  • Task card for How Did Bud Use His Rule? charts (one per triad)
  • Bud's Rule strips (one per triad)
  • Bud, Not Buddy: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Discussion: Survive or Thrive? (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to take out their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer as a resource for discussion.
  • Display the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: How Does Bud Use His Rules--To Survive or To Thrive? Argument Essay using a document camera, and read: "How does Bud use his rules: to survive or to thrive?" Encourage students to read closely and think about what the question is really asking them to decide.
  • Ask them to use their Bud's Rules graphic organizer as they turn and talk with a partner:

*  "How does Bud use his rules to help him: to survive or to thrive?"

  • Invite a few students to share their answers. Probe them to include a reason. Listen for students who use a text-based piece of evidence to support their claim. Hold off on comments at this time. You will use student answers when you unpack the learning targets and launch the work time. Consider writing students' thinking on a document camera as they share. 
  • Providing a focus question offers students a clear vision for their writing. 

B. Unpack Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read today's learning targets:

* "I can analyze how Bud used his rules: to survive or to thrive."

* "I can argue a claim using text evidence from the novel."

  • Ask:

* "What do you have to do to argue, rather than give an opinion? Think back to our learning target discussion from Lesson 9. Show a thumbs-up when you have an answer in your head."

  • Cold call a few students. Listen for them to say that to argue is to tell what you think and use text evidence to support your thinking.
  • Refer to the examples students shared in the opening discussion. Explain which example was more of an argument because of the text evidence the students gave. Explain which one was an opinion and needed text evidence to support it. Reassure students that they will get to practice this in the lesson today. They will analyze Bud's rule to make a well-supported claim.
  • Consider providing select students with a partially filled-in graphic organizer--for example, an organizer with sentence starters--to help them get started.
  • Posting learning targets for students allows them to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Finding Text Evidence: How Did Bud Use His Rules? (18 minutes)

  • Using a document camera, display the End of Unit 2 Assessment Prompt: How Does Bud Use His Rules--To Survive or To Thrive? Argument Essay and point out the focus question: "How does Bud use his rules: to survive or to thrive?"
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "How are you going to decide which side to argue?"

* "What steps do you have to take to answer this question?"

  • Refocus students whole group. Invite a few volunteers to answer. Listen for students to say they will look over the rules, pick a side, and find evidence to support it. Clarify two points if needed: First, before students choose a side, they should review their resources and consider the evidence. Second, if students say they are deciding whether Bud survives or thrives, clarify the misconception. Let them know they are correct that they have to take a side on survive or thrive. But clarify that they have to determine how Bud used his rules, and whether this helped him survive or thrive. Clarifying these potential misconceptions from the beginning will be important to students' success in answering the focus question.
  • Display the How Did Bud Use His Rule? model chart. Explain that each triad will get one rule to explain and present on their chart. The task is to create a chart like the model that provides details they find in the novel on how Bud used that rule. Explain to only write text evidence from the novel. Just as with the model, they do not include their ideas about how Bud used the rule. The next part of the lesson is for a silent Gallery Walk where all the students will read across the rules, make their claim, and begin to select evidence.
  • Review directions while directing student attention to parts of the model that correspond to each number of the directions.
  1. Write your rule, page number, and chapter on one side.
  2. Skim the novel before and after the rule.
  3. Discuss with your group what you all found from skimming.
  4. Write the text evidence from the novel that will help the class remember exactly how Bud used that rule. NOTE: This is not where you argue whether it helped him survive or thrive.
  5. Consider these questions as you work:

* Does Bud use the rule immediately?

* Does he use it later in novel?

* Does he break his own rule?

  • Ask if there are any questions.
  • Explain that there are 10 rules left to review and chart (one for each rule.)
  • Direct students to count off 1 to 10, remembering their numbers. Tell all the 1s to get in a group, all the 2s, all the 3s, etc. This structure provides diversity in student grouping and a chance for students to hear new ideas and thoughts about the novel. Invite students to bring their Bud, Not Buddy novel and their Bud's Rules graphic organizer as resources.
  • Distribute to each group a piece of chart paper, a marker, the task card for How Did Bud Use His Rule? charts, and a rule from the Bud's Rule strips.
  • Circulate and support groups. Provide feedback on the learning target they are working on here: "I can analyze how Bud uses his rules: to survive or to thrive." For students who are stuck, prompt them by asking one of the questions in the directions: Does Bud use the rule immediately? Does he use it later in novel? Does he break his own rule?
  • Encourage students to write large and neatly, as everyone in the class will read their chart during the Gallery Walk.
  • Direct groups to locations to hang their charts around the room, making sure there is enough space between each chart for students to wander for the Gallery Walk.
  • Consider partnering ELL students who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow students to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.
  • For students who struggle with following multistep directions, consider displaying these directions using a document camera or interactive white board. Another option is to type up these instructions for students to have in hand.

B. Silent Gallery Walk: Weighing Evidence: Survive vs. Thrive (15 minutes)

  • Distribute the Bud, Not Buddy: Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer to each student.
  • Review the Gallery Walk protocol. Invite students to imagine being in a museum and walking around to look at each piece of art hanging on the walls. In this lesson, rather than looking at artwork, they will read text evidence on how Bud used each of his rules. Explain that students will rotate to each chart hung on the wall. At each chart they should read the text evidence, thinking and talking about how Bud uses this rule: to survive or to thrive. Was Bud using this rule to actually help him live through a situation, or was he using it to achieve his goals and have a better life?
  • Direct students to spread out among all 10 charts to have no more than three or four students at a chart. Remind students that the Gallery Walk is silent. Tell them they have 7 minutes to rotate through all the charts.
  • After 7 minutes, or sooner if students are done, pause everyone. Tell students that you will now pose a focus question to them. Explain that they will think about the focus question independently, then have a Mix and Mingle to share their thoughts.
  • Ask the focus question:

*       "How does Bud use his rules: to survive or to thrive?"

  • Remind students that in a Mix and Mingle, they talk with a variety of people to hear a variety of ideas. They speak with each person for 30 seconds. Whenever the teacher says, "Go," they are to find another person to talk with for 30 seconds.
  • Explain that with each new partner, students should answer the focus question and explain their thinking. Encourage them to use text evidence from the charts to support their answer. Invite them to try arguing both sides if they are unclear about their answer at this time.
  • Circulate and listen to students' conversations. After 30 seconds, say, "Go." Do this rotation three times, giving students practice supporting their answer and hearing how other students are thinking about Bud's rules.
  • After they have talked with three partners, pause students. Tell them to consider all that they thought about and heard from other students. Invite students to write their first-draft claim on their Forming Evidenced-Based Claims graphic organizer.
  • Direct students to Round 2 of the silent Gallery Walk. Tell students they should go around to several charts and analyze whether or not the rule will support their first-draft claim. A good question for students to ask themselves is, "Did the way Bud used this rule help him survive or thrive?"
  • Direct students to select three rules they believe supports their claim. Tell them to write the rule in the text evidence box when they think the rule is a good support for their claim.
  • Direct students to sit in their triads when they finish the Gallery Walk. 
  • Mixed-ability grouping of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text. Determine these groups ahead of time.
  • Use of protocols allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students to practice their speaking and listening skills.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Triads: What Do You Think about Bud's Rules Now? Thrive or Survive? (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to share with their triad their first-draft claim and their three rules. Tell them to explain why they chose these rules to support their claim.
  • Reassure students that their answers may change as their ideas become clearer when they begin writing. That's why this is a "first draft."
  • Circulate and listen closely to how students support their answers.
  • Giving students time to debrief and discuss their ideas allows them to see how other students are approaching a task and gain clarity around possible areas of confusion. 

Homework

Homework
  • Continue your independent reading. In Lesson 11, be prepared to explain what you think of your book so far.

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