How Does the Author Convey Themes in Bud, Not Buddy? | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U2:L1

How Does the Author Convey Themes in Bud, Not Buddy?

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine a theme based on details in a literary text and how it is conveyed through details in the text. (RL.6.2)
  • I can compare and contrast how different genres communicate the same theme or idea. (RL.6.9)

Supporting Targets

  • I can select text evidence to support themes from Bud, Not Buddy.
  • I can analyze the writing techniques the author uses to convey themes in Bud, Not Buddy.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Conveying Theme in Bud Not Buddy charts
  • Exit ticket: How Does the author Convey Theme?

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.   Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 13 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Triads Complete Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy Charts (25 minutes)

     B. Gallery Walk of Charts (5 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Exit Ticket: How Does the Author Convey Theme? (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 14 of Bud, Not Buddy.

  • In Module 1, Unit 2, students distinguished between a topic and theme and determined themes of myths using evidence from the text. Work Time Part A of this lesson revisits this as students search for evidence that communicates four given themes in Bud, Not Buddy and analyze how the evidence they have chosen communicates the theme. Text evidence may support more than one thematic statement.
  • Students will revisit the Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts in Lessons 3, 5, and 7 of this unit.
  • In advance: Prepare the five Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts (see supporting materials for examples).
  • Review: Gallery Walk protocol (Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets and the five Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts.

Vocabulary

inference, evidence, narrator, protagonist;

vagrant, orphaned, Depression

Materials

  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Word-catcher (from Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts (new; created by students in small groups; see supporting materials)
  • Bud, Not Buddy (book; one per student)
  • Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts (new; five total; teacher-generated; see supporting materials for samples)
  • Markers (one per student)
  • Exit ticket: How Does the Author Convey Theme? (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Chapter 13 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in their triads.
  • Write the following questions on the board. Ask students to use what they recorded on their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer to think and then discuss:

*  "What is the meaning of Bud's Rule #63?"

*  "What does the word kin mean in this rule?"

*  "Do you agree with Bud's rule? Why or why not?"

  • Circulate to listen in on triads to ensure all students are participating in the discussion and have completed their homework. Remind students to write kin in their word-catcher if appropriate.
  • Discussing the homework task from the previous lesson at the beginning of the lesson holds students accountable for doing their homework. It also gives you an opportunity to assess who is reading the novel at home and who isn't.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the first learning target aloud with you:

*  "I can select text evidence to support themes from Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Tell students they identified themes of myths in Module 1, Unit 2. Ask students to turn and talk with a partner:

*  "What is a theme?"

  • Cold call students. Listen for and guide them to recall that themes are the author's message about a topic. Consider providing the example used in Module 1, the topic of parent-child relationships where the theme was, "A mother will put her love for her children above every other relationship."
  • Tell students they learned that authors convey, or communicate, the theme through important details or events. Invite students to read the second learning target aloud with you:

*  "I can analyze the writing techniques the author uses to convey themes in Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*  "What does it mean to convey something?"

  • Listen for students to explain that convey means to put across or to communicate.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets for students allows them to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. The targets also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Triads Complete Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy Anchor Charts (25 minutes)

  • Focus students on the five Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts. See the Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts (for Teacher Reference) in supporting materials for examples. Remind students that these are thematic statements--statements about theme. Invite students to read each thematic statement with you.
  • Tell students they are going to continue working in triads to look back at previous chapters in Bud, Not Buddy and find text evidence that supports one of the themes just reviewed.
  • Display Chart 2 and prompt students to notice that the left side of the chart is for evidence directly from the novel. The right side is for them to record their analysis of writing techniques used by Christopher Paul Curtis in his book.
  • Ask students to discuss in their triads:

* "How does a writer communicate theme? What are some writing techniques used to convey theme?"

* "Having read a lot of the novel now, what are your first ideas about how Curtis conveys these themes?"

  • Invite students to share their triad discussion with the class. Record student ideas on a new Conveying Themes anchor chart. Students may struggle to answer these questions, so ensure that the writing techniques used to convey theme are included on the anchor chart:

*  Narrator's thoughts

*  Dialogue between characters

*  Plot (action in the story)

  • Model how to fill out the charts using Chart 2. Direct students to reread the thematic statement on the chart: "Most people in the world are kind, especially in hard times."
  • Ask students:

*  "So what is this thematic statement about? If you are given this chart to work on, what are you going to be looking for evidence of?"

  • Cold call students for their responses. Listen for them to explain that the theme is about kindness, so they will be looking for evidence of kindness.
  • Circle the word "kind" in the thematic statement to emphasize it.
  • Model how to fill out the chart with Chapter 6 of the novel; you will be looking for evidence of kindness. Begin flipping through pages of the chapter, reading the words you are skimming and sharing the thoughts in your head, in order for students to hear and see how a reader skims and scans a familiar text.
  • After skimming over page 48, stop reading and write on the chart:
  • "Chapter 6, all page 48." Explain to students that this event in the book conveys the theme because the other family helps Bud get food even though they don't know him. On the right side of the chart write the gist of this event: "Bud is helped in the mission line to get food by a family he has never met before."
  • Direct students' attention to the right side of the chart about the author's writing techniques. As you look back over page 48, think aloud about how you determine the writing techniques. It may sound something like this: "I notice quotes and dialogue on this page. I also notice Bud's thoughts about his pretend dad and how the other people in line were reacting. I think Curtis is conveying this theme through dialogue with new characters and Bud's thoughts."
  • Write on the left side of the chart: "Curtis is telling us this event through dialogue with new characters and Bud's thoughts."
  • Ask students:

* "What part of the lesson will help you meet our first learning target today?"

  • Listen for: "Selection of evidence," left side of the chart.

* "What part of the lesson will help you meet our second learning target for today?"

  • Listen for: "Curtis's writing techniques," right side of the chart.
  • Explain that each student in the triad will be skimming and scanning one chapter. Direct students' attention to where the chapters are listed beneath the thematic statement. Explain that Chart 4 will have actually two parts: 4A will review Chapters 8-10, and 4B will review Chapters 11-13.
  • Invite students to get in their triads. Assign each triad a chart:

* Chart 1

* Chart 2

* Chart 3

* Chart 4A

* Chart 4B

  • Hand out markers and ask students to record their ideas on their chart as you modeled.
  • Circulate and observe the text evidence students are selecting to support each thematic statement. Consider probing students and supporting their group discussions with questions such as:

* "Can you tell me a little about why this text evidence supports this thematic statement?"

* "How does Curtis convey this event or detail to us, the readers?"

  • Reconvene students. Ask one member of each triad to place their charts around the room. Consider pairing charts with the same theme next to one another.
  • Mixed-ability grouping of students for regular discussion and close reading exercises will provide a collaborative and supportive structure for reading complex texts and close reading of the text.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide the necessary scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing the graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially challenged learners.
  • Consider placing students in heterogeneous groupings for their triads based on individual strengths and needs. Each student should understand they bring individual strengths to their group: strong reading skills, writing skills, discussion facilitation, creativity, etc.
  • Having students analyze an image allows them to practice the skills of a close reader, such as asking questions, noticing details, and looking back multiple times for different purposes.
  • Some students may benefit from a sentence starter to prompt their conversations: "The life of an orphaned child would be different because ..."

B. Gallery Walk of Charts (5 minutes)

  • Review the Gallery Walk protocol with students. Tell students the purpose for the Gallery Walk is to focus on the second learning target:

* "I can analyze the writing techniques Curtis uses to convey themes in Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Invite students to spend 5 minutes circulating to read the right-hand column of each chart looking at the different writing techniques Curtis used to convey the themes in the novel. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: How Does the Author Convey Theme? (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: How Does the Author Convey Theme?
  • Give directions:
  1. Put your name on your index card, as this will be your exit ticket today.
  2. Write down three writing techniques you notice Curtis using frequently to convey the themes in the novel.
  3. Write down any questions you have about themes of Bud, Not Buddy or conveying thematic statements in novels.
  • Collect exit tickets and Conveying Theme in Bud, Not Buddy charts to assess student needs for comparing and contrasting themes in different genres (coming up later in Unit 2).
  • Using entrance/exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs during the lesson or before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 14 of Bud, Not Buddy. You will not have to add to your chart for Bud's rules because there are no rules in this chapter. Instead, use evidence flags as you read to identify three moments in Chapter 14 that show that Bud's life is changing from surviving to thriving.

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