Text-Dependent Questions and Making a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 12–14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 9) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L9

Text-Dependent Questions and Making a Claim: Digging Deeper into Paragraphs 12–14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 9)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text (RI.6.1)
  • I can determine the main idea of an informational text based on details in the text. (RI.6.2)
  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, paragraph, chapter, or section fits in and contributes to the development of ideas in a text. (RI.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can read Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs speech closely in order to answer text-dependent questions.
  • I can make a claim using details from Paragraphs 9-14 of the Steve Jobs speech.
  • I can connect the events described by Steve Jobs in Paragraphs 9-14 of his speech to those experienced by Bud in the novel Bud, Not Buddy.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Questions from Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy (5 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Text-Dependent Questions, Paragraphs 12-14 (15 minutes)

     B. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: Paragraphs 9-14 (18 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Connecting the Steve Jobs Speech to Bud, Not Buddy (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Read Chapter 10 of Bud, Not Buddy. Identify the rules Bud refers to in the chapter and complete your Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 7 and is the second of the two-lesson cycle. In this lesson, students dig deeper into Paragraphs 12-14 in order to answer text-dependent questions.
  • In this lesson, students use the Odell Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer to make a claim to answer a question. They gather details from the text to answer the question and then connect those details to make a claim. To prepare students to work independently on making an evidence-based claim in Lesson 11, in this lesson they identify one detail and the thinking behind choosing one detail as a whole group.
  • In advance: Read the Close Reading Guide for this lesson (see supporting materials) and familiarize yourself with the text-dependent questions and suggested answers.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

claim, evidence 

Materials

  • Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs (from Lesson 6)
  • Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs Speech--Text-Dependent Questions (one per student)
  • Close Reading Guide--Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs Speech (for Teacher Reference)
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Document camera
  • Forming Evidence-Based Claims task card (one per student)
  • Connections between Steve Jobs and Bud anchor chart (from Lesson 7)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Questions from Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy (5 minutes)

  • Remind students of the homework questions:

* "What idea is Bud talking about?"

* "How did it grow?"

* "Does this remind you of anything else in the book?"

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their answers to the homework questions with supporting details.
  • Cold call students to share their ideas whole group.
  • Reviewing the homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can read Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs speech closely in order to answer text-dependent questions."

* "I can make a claim using details from Paragraphs 9-14 of the Steve Jobs speech."

* "I can connect the events described by Steve Jobs in Paragraphs 9-14 of his speech to those experienced by Bud in the novel Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Tell students that these learning targets are similar to those in Lesson 7 because this lesson follows a similar structure.
  • Remind them that they did a lot of work on making claims about a text in Module 1.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Text-Dependent Questions, Paragraphs 12-14 (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have got the gist of Paragraphs 12-14, they are going to dig deeper into this section of the text in order to understand it fully.
  • Ask students to get out their copies of Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs and distribute Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs Speech--Text-Dependent Questions (see supporting materials). Students work through the first part of this handout in concert with the Close Reading Guide (for Teacher Reference).
  • Text-dependent questions can be answered only by referring explicitly back to the text being read. This encourages students to reread the text for further analysis and allows for a deeper understanding

B. Forming Evidence-Based Claims: Paragraphs 9-14 (18 minutes)

  • Distribute the Forming Evidence-Based Claims graphic organizer and display it using a document camera. Remind students that they used this organizer in Lesson 7 to find details to support a claim given to them.
  • Tell them that this time, they are going to have to make the claim themselves in order to answer a question, just as they did in Module 1 when making a claim about the themes of myths.
  • Post this question on the board and explain that the claim students make needs to answer this question:

* "In Paragraph 14, Steve Jobs goes on to tell his audience two things not to do, beginning his sentences with the word 'don't.' What does Paragraph 14 suggest he is trying to tell the graduates?"

  • Invite students to record the question at the top of their Evidence-Based Claims organizer for quick reference as they are working.
  • Pair students up. Invite the pairs to work together to reread Paragraphs 12-14, underline details to answer the question, and annotate their thinking about that detail in the margin of the text. Remind students that they did this with Paragraphs 6-8 in Lesson 7. Give them 5 minutes to work.
  • Cold call students to share the details they underlined and to use their annotations to justify why that detail answers the question. Record one of the details in the first box on the displayed organizer as a model. An example would be: "You've got to find what you love. And that is as true for your work as it is for your lovers."
  • Record the thinking about that detail in the box below the detail as a model. An example would be: "He is telling the graduates a rule to follow."
  • Remind students that once they have recorded three details and their thinking about those details, they need to think about how the details are connected and then use that connection to make a claim to answer the question.
  • Distribute the Forming Evidence-Based Claims task card. Invite students to read the directions with you. Tell them to follow these directions to form an evidence-based claim to answer the question.
  • Circulate to assist students. Ask probing questions such as the following:

* "Why have you chosen that detail?"

* "What is your thinking behind choosing that detail?"

* "How are those details connected?"

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their work. Tell them that they may make revisions to their evidence-based claim based on what they hear from their peers.
  • Select volunteers to share their claims and details with the whole group. Listen for them to explain that Steve Jobs is telling the graduates that sometimes we can hit unexpected challenges, but we need to keep trying and not settle for less than what we really love.
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow them to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Connecting the Steve Jobs Speech to Bud, Not Buddy (6 minutes)

  • Pair students up. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

* "After reading this part of the speech, including Paragraphs 9 and 10, which you read through briefly in Lesson 8, what new connections can you see between Steve Jobs and Bud? How are their experiences similar? How are they different?"

  • Select students to share their responses with the whole group.
  • Refocus the group. Focus students' attention on the Connections between Steve Jobs and Bud anchor chart. Invite them to suggest connections between Steve Jobs and Bud to record on the anchor chart. Tell them that they will use these connections for an assessment later in the unit. Suggestions might include:

*  Both Bud and Steve Jobs faced hard times but kept trying to find what they really loved.

*  Neither settled until they had found what they loved.

  • Anchor charts serve as note-catchers when the class is co-constructing ideas and recording ideas for future reference.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 10 of Bud, Not Buddy. Identify the rules Bud refers to in the chapter and complete your Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer.

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