Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 12–14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 8) | EL Education Curriculum

You are here

ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L8

Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 12–14 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 8)

You are here:

Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can get the gist of Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs speech.
  • I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated Steve Jobs speech
  • Venn Diagram

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Bud, Not Buddy (6 minutes)

     B.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Listening to the Steve Jobs Speech (Paragraphs 9-14) While Reading Along (5 minutes)

     B. Reading for the Gist and Vocabulary, Paragraphs 12-14 (22 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Love and Loss Venn Diagram (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Read Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 6. Lesson 8 is the first lesson in the next lesson cycle and has students reading for gist and determining the meaning of unknown words from context. In Lesson 9, they dig deeper into the short excerpt by answering text-dependent questions.
  • In this lesson, the same questions are repeated to give students practice with increased independence and to gradually release them to perform this task independently in later lessons.
  • Due to time constraints, students do not read Paragraphs 9-11 closely for gist or to identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from context; however, students may struggle with the following vocabulary in these paragraphs: diverge, devastating, entrepreneurs.
  • In advance: Prepare technology to play the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address from times 05:35-09:00. If this equipment is unavailable, you can read Paragraphs 9-14 aloud to the class.
  • Post: Learning targets, Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart.

Vocabulary

gist; heaviness, lightness, animated, feature film, studio, heart, renaissance, convinced, settle

Materials

  • Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs (from Lesson 6)
  • Document camera
  • Video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address
  • Technology to display video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (from Module 1, Unit 2, Lesson 2; one per student and one to display)
  • Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart (from Lesson 6)
  • Word-catcher (from Lesson 1)
  • Love and Loss Venn Diagram (one per student and one to display)
  • Connections between Steve Jobs and Bud anchor chart (from Lesson 7)
  • Homework: Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Bud, Not Buddy (6 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their annotated Hooverville pictures drawn for homework. Ask triads to discuss:

* "How are the pictures different?"

* "Why are the pictures different?"

  • Cold call students to share their triad discussions with the class. Emphasize that sometimes, even though things are described to us in a text one way, we can interpret them in our own way. We add our own imagination to what we are given, which is why the pictures may be quite different.
  • Select volunteers to share the descriptive language details about Hooverville from the novel that they based their drawings on. Those details should be annotations on their drawings.
  • Reviewing the homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Tell students that this lesson and Lesson 9 repeat the pattern of Lessons 6 and 7, in which we read for the gist and vocabulary in one lesson and then closely read the same section in the next lesson.
  • Read the learning targets to students and ask if there are any questions about them:

* "I can get the gist of Paragraphs 12-14 of the Steve Jobs speech."

* "I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context."

  • Ask:

* "Why do we read for gist?"

  • Cold call students. Listen for them to explain that it helps them get an idea of what the text is mostly about and the way it is structured.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Listening to the Steve Jobs Speech (Paragraphs 9-14) While Reading Along (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that in Lessons 6 and 7, they explored the first eight paragraphs of the Steve Jobs speech. Tell them that now they are going to read the next section, which is his next story about love and loss.
  • Ask students to follow along with their copies of Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs as you play 05:35-09:00 (Paragraphs 9-14) of the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address without stopping.
  • Watching Steve Jobs give the speech will improve student engagement in the text and give them a deeper understanding of the meaning through his intonation and the emphasis he places on words and phrases.

B. Reading for the Gist and Vocabulary, Paragraphs 12-14 (22 minutes)

  • Tell students they will read Paragraphs 12-14 for the gist, just as they did in Lesson 6.
  • Using a document camera, display paragraphs 12-14 of Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs. Ask students to read along silently as you read them aloud. As with other read-alouds, remember that the purpose is to read the text slowly, fluently, and without interruption. Don't stop to address comprehension or vocabulary issues, as these will be addressed later and it would interrupt the flow of the text.
  • Pair students up. Invite them to reread Paragraph 12, discuss the gist with their partner, write their annotations, and circle any unknown words in the speech.
  • Remind students to use the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout used in Lesson 6.
  • Circulate and read student annotations, looking for a student response like: "Getting fired was actually a good thing, and he became more creative."
  • Invite a share from a student whose annotation is close to the example above to share their gist with the whole group. Ask the class for thumbs-up if they agree with the student's gist or thumbs-down if they don't. Confirm that this is a good example of the gist of Paragraph 12. Address any questions.
  • Invite students to do the same thing with Paragraphs 13 and 14: reread, annotate the gist, and circle unfamiliar words.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading and to read student annotations. Look for students to have annotated something similar to these examples:

* Paragraph 13--Steve Jobs kept creating new and good companies. He also started his family.

* Paragraph 14--Do what you love and don't stop until you find it.

  • Invite students to talk with their triad to compare what they wrote for their gist statements.
  • Reconvene whole class. Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What strategies do you use to determine the meaning of unknown words?"

  • Remind students to refer to the bullet points on the Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart.
  • Ask them to share the unfamiliar words they circled one paragraph at a time. Words students may struggle with:

* Paragraph 12: heaviness, lightness

* Paragraph 13: animated, feature film, studio, heart, renaissance

* Paragraph 14: awful, convinced, settle

  • Be sure to address these words here. Cold call to ask students what each word means and how they figured it out. Direct students to use context clues when possible. If they are stuck on a word, model briefly to ensure understanding for all.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catcher.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.
  • Research shows that ongoing, immediate feedback is critical to student growth and engagement. Specifically, explain what students are doing well and what they can do to improve with clear next steps in relation to the learning target. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Love and Loss Venn Diagram (10 minutes)

  • Remind students that this part of the Steve Jobs speech was about love and loss. Display and distribute Love and Loss Venn Diagram. Focus students' attention on the question at the top of the diagram: "How are Steve Jobs' and Bud's experiences of love and loss similar, and how are they different?"
  • Explain that the left circle is for experiences that are unique to Steve Jobs, and the right circle is for experiences that are unique to Bud. The middle of the diagram is for ways Steve Jobs' and Bud's experiences are similar.
  • Invite students to work in triads to complete their Venn diagram.
  • Cold call students to share their similarities and differences with the whole group. Record similarities on the Connections between Steve Jobs and Bud anchor chart.
  • Distribute Homework: Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy
  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 9 of Bud, Not Buddy. In this chapter, Bud says: "It's funny how ideas are, in a lot of ways they're just like seeds. Both of them start real small and then ... woop, zoop, sloop ... before you can say Jack Robinson they've gone and grown a lot bigger than you ever thought they could" (pages 91 and 92). Refer to the text to help you answer these questions:

* "What is the idea Bud is talking about?"

* "How did it grow?"

* "Does this remind you of anything else in the book?"

Get updates about our new K-5 curriculum as new materials and tools debut.

Sign Up