Getting the Gist: Steve Jobs Commencement Address (Focus on Paragraphs 6-8, and connecting to Chapter 6) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L6

Getting the Gist: Steve Jobs Commencement Address (Focus on Paragraphs 6-8, and connecting to Chapter 6)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can get the gist of Paragraphs 6-8 of the Steve Jobs speech.
  • I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Entrance ticket
  • Annotated Steve Jobs speech
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 6? (8 minutes)

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Read and Discuss Paragraph 1 (8 minutes)

B. Reading and Listening to Paragraphs 1-8 of the Steve Jobs Speech (10 minutes)

C. Getting the Gist and Identifying Vocabulary, Paragraphs 6-8 (12 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Exit Ticket: Why Do People Have Rules to Live By? (5 minutes)

4. Homework

A. Read Chapter 7 of Bud, Not Buddy. Complete the Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer for any rules you encounter in this chapter. 

  • In this lesson, students are introduced to the Steve Jobs speech. This lesson is the first in a two-lesson cycle that will be repeated until students have read the whole speech closely. In this first lesson of the cycle, they listen to Steve Jobs delivering a section of the speech while following along in their own text. Then they find the gist and identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in a short excerpt. In the second lesson, they dig deeper into the short extract by answering text-dependent questions.
  • Lessons 6-11 of Unit 1 are based heavily on the Making Evidence-Based Claims units developed by Odell Education. Go to the original Odell Education units.
  • Students use the Odell Education Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout to guide their reading for gist. Students should be familiar with this resource from Module 1; it is included again for easy reference.
  • Due to time constraints, students do not read Paragraphs 2-5 closely for gist or to identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from context; however, students may struggle with the following vocabulary in Paragraphs 2-5: relented, naively, tuition, intuition, subtle destiny, karma.
  • In advance: Read Paragraphs 1-8 of the speech, focusing on the gist. Prepare technology to play the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address from times 00:00-05:34. If this equipment is unavailable, you can read aloud Paragraphs 1-8 of the speech to students. Prepare a new anchor chart: Strategies for Determining Unknown Words (see supporting materials).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

gist; university commencement address, dorm, deposits, Hare Krishna, intuition, typography, typefaces, proportionally

Materials

  • Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 6? (one per student and one to display)
  • Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs (one per student and one to display)
  • Video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address
  • Technology to display video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (from Module 1; included again in supprting materials for this lesson; one per student and one to display)
  • Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart (new; teacher-generated; see supporting materials for sample)
  • Document camera
  • Word-catcher (from Lesson 1)
  • Exit Ticket: Why Do People Have Rules to Live By? (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 6? (8 minutes)

  • Display and distribute the Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 6?
  • Remind students that they did this in Lesson 4 because Chapter 4 also contained no rules. Remind them that they need to first skim the chapter. Then they should think about what title they would give the chapter and why. They will write their title and evidence on the entrance ticket. Remind them that they need to justify their choice of title by using evidence from the text.
  • Invite students to pair up with someone to share their title and their reason for choosing it.
  • Cold call a few students to share their partner's title and the reason they chose that title.
  • Reviewing the homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*       "I can get the gist of Paragraphs 6-8 of the Steve Jobs speech."

*       "I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context."

  • Remind students what the word gist means (understanding what the text is mostly about).
  • Invite them to Think-Pair-Share:

*       "Given these learning targets, what do you think we are going to be doing in this lesson?"

  • Listen for students to explain that they are going to be reading a speech by Steve Jobs, getting the gist of particular paragraphs, and then identifying the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary in the speech from the context.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Read and Discuss Paragraph 1 (8 minutes)

  • Ask students to sit in their triads.
  • Distribute Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs and display using a document camera.
  • Invite students to read the title of the speech with you. Ask them to think and then discuss in their triads:

*       "Who was Steve Jobs?"

*       "What do you know about him?"

  • Listen for students to explain that Steve Jobs started Apple, the company that makes iPads, iPhones and Macs, and Pixar, the animation company. Students may also know that he died of cancer in 2011; if they don't know this, it may be appropriate to encourage a respectful tone when analyzing his speech.
  • Tell the class that a university commencement address is a speech at a commencement ceremony, which is an event for students who are graduating from college.
  • Invite students to read along silently in their heads as you read Paragraph 1 aloud, beginning at "I am honored ..." and ending with "Just three stories."
  • Write these questions on the board. Invite students to discuss in their triads:

*       "What does this introductory paragraph tell you?"

*       "What do we learn about Steve Jobs in this introduction?"

*       "What is the structure of this speech going to be?"

*       "Why would he structure it this way?"

  • Select students from each triad to share their answers. Listen for them to explain that it tells us that Stanford is a good college and that Jobs didn't graduate from college. We learn that Jobs is going to tell three stories in his speech, and he may have structured it this way because he wants the new graduates to learn from his stories. 
  • Introducing Steve Jobs as a person and helping students to understand more about who he was and his achievements that are relevant to their lives will engage students in the speech.

B. Reading and Listening to Paragraphs 1-8 of the Steve Jobs Speech (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that the speech they just started reading was recorded, so they are now going to listen to Steve Jobs giving the first part of the speech (Paragraphs 1-8).
  • Ask students to follow along with their texts. Explain that in the video of the speech, Jobs adds a few words to the written speech. It is common for people who are giving a speech to add words in the moment as they interact with their audience.
  • Play 00:00-05:34 (Paragraphs 1-8) of the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address without stopping. 
  • Watching Steve Jobs give the speech will improve student engagement in the text and give them a deeper understanding of the meaning through his intonation and the emphasis he places on words and phrases.
  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.

C. Getting the Gist and Identifying Vocabulary, Paragraphs 6-8 (12 minutes)

  • Display the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout. Remind students that they were given this handout in Module 1. Explain that in this lesson, they are going to look at the "Questioning Texts" row of the chart.
  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*       "Which of these questions do you think will help guide our reading so we can get the gist of an extract of the Steve Jobs speech?"

  • Listen out for and encourage students toward all the Topic, Information, and Ideas questions. (What is this text mainly about? What information or ideas does the text present? What details stand out to me as I read?) Highlight/check-mark those questions on the displayed copy of the document. Invite students to do the same on their chart to be a reference as they read.
  • Tell students that they are going to reread Paragraphs 6-8 of the speech. Ask them to read along silently as you read it aloud. As with other read-alouds, remember that the purpose is to read the text slowly, fluently, and without interruption. Don't stop to address comprehension or vocabulary issues, as these will be addressed later and stopping would interrupt the flow of the text.
  • Ask students to discuss in their triads:

*       "What do you understand from this excerpt so far?"

  • Select volunteers to share their answers with the class. Listen for them to explain that Steve Jobs tells us how taking the calligraphy class had a huge impact on the rest of his life.
  • Cold call students to ask how they have arrived at the gist before. Listen for: "We read one paragraph at a time, then paraphrased the paragraph in the margin next to the text."
  • Invite students to silently reread Paragraph 6 of the speech for the gist. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*       "What is the gist of this paragraph? What is this paragraph mostly about?"

  • Listen for them to explain that it is mostly about how he took a calligraphy class.
  • Model annotating your text, recording the gist or paraphrasing in the margin next to Paragraph 6 and circling unfamiliar words to come back to later.
  • Invite students to do the same with Paragraphs 7 and 8 of the speech, annotating the gist and circling words that are unfamiliar.
  • Circulate and support students as they read. For those who need more support, ask them to practice telling you the gist of a section before they write it in the margin.
  • Invite students to talk with their triad to compare what they wrote for their gist statements.
  • Reconvene whole group. Ask students to share, one paragraph at a time, the unfamiliar words they circled.
  • Display and review the anchor chart Strategies for Determining Unknown Words:

*      Focus students on the bolded words and the accompanying glossary at the end of the page.

*      Read from the sentence around the word to help students understand the meaning from the context.

*      Read words from the sentences or paragraphs around the word that might provide context clues.

*     Invite other students to help you explain what the word means.

*     If the strategies above fail, tell students what the word means. 

  • Words students may struggle with:

*    Paragraph 6: dorm, deposits, Hare Krishna, intuition

*    Paragraph 7: typography, typefaces, proportionally

  • Be sure to address these words here. Cold call to ask students what each word means and how they figured it out. Direct them to use context clues when possible. If they are stuck on a word, model briefly to ensure understanding for all.
  • Remind students to record new words on their word-catcher.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Why Do People Have Rules to Live By? (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to refer to Paragraphs 6-8 of the speech and to discuss in their triads:

*       "Like Bud, Steve Jobs suggests rules. What rules does Steve Jobs suggest in these paragraphs of his speech?"

  • Listen for students to say: "You have to trust in something--your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever."
  • Distribute the exit ticket: Why Do People Have Rules to Live By? Ask:

*       "Both Bud and Steve Jobs have rules to live by. Why do people have rules to live by?"

  • Give students a minute to think about how to answer this question. Then invite them to record their answer on their exit ticket.
  • Using exit tickets allows you to get a quick check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs before the next lesson. 

Homework

Homework

A. Read Chapter 7 of Bud, Not Buddy. Complete the Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer for any rules you encounter in this chapter. 

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