Interpreting Figurative Language and Answering Selected Response Questions (Chapter 4) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L4

Interpreting Figurative Language and Answering Selected Response Questions (Chapter 4)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how the author's word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel.
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy

Ongoing Assessment

  • Entrance ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 4?
  • Selected Response Questions, Chapter 4 of Bud, Not Buddy
  • Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 4? (8 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Writing: Interpreting Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy (10  minutes)

     B. Read-aloud of Excerpt from Chapter 4 and Completion of Selected Response Questions (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Discussion of Selected Response Question (5 minutes

4.  Homework

     A. Read Chapter 5 of Bud, Not Buddy.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 2. Students continue using the Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer to analyze figurative language from the novel, now without any modeling or input from the teacher. This increased independence will help prepare them for the mid-unit assessment in Lesson 5.
  • In Lesson 2, students answered selected response questions about word choice in triads. Now they will independently answer selected response questions, then discuss their answers with their triads to scaffold for Lesson 5.
  • Post: Learning targets, Strategies for Selected Response Questions anchor chart.

Vocabulary

word choice, tone, meaning, figurative language; tortured

Materials

  • Bud, Not Buddy (book; one per student)
  • Entrance ticket: "What Would You Title Chapter 4?" (one per student)
  • Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer (from Lesson 2; students' copies and one for display)
  • Bud, Not Buddy: Chapter 4 Figurative Language (one per student)
  • Strategies for Answering Selected Response Questions anchor chart (from Lesson 2)
  • Selected Response Questions, Chapter 4 of Bud, Not Buddy (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Entrance Ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 4? (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their answers to the homework questions:

* "What did Bud do to Todd? Why did he do it?"

  • Cold call students to share their answers.
  • Display and distribute the entrance ticket: What Would You Title Chapter 4? Invite students to discuss in their triads:

* "What happened in Chapter 4?"

  • Ask them to choose a title for Chapter 4 and record it on their entrance ticket.
  • Provide a model for students to support their thinking and conversations. For example, you might suggest titling Chapter 3 "The Shed" because most of what happens in the chapter happens in the shed.
  • Refocus the whole class and cold call a few students to share their titles and their reason for choosing that title with the whole group.
  • Displaying directions helps all students focus on the task and follow steps for increased success, but it especially helps those students who need information in small chunks.
  • Consider placing ELLs in homogeneous pairs to discuss the title of the chapter. 

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite the class to read the learning targets with you:

* "I can explain how the author's word choice affects tone and meaning in the novel."
*  "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Remind students that these are the same targets they have been working with for three days. 
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Writing: Interpreting Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy (10 minutes)

  • Display and invite students to take out the Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer (from Lesson 2). Review the example recorded in Lesson 2 to remind students how to fill out the organizer.
  • Distribute Bud, Not Buddy: Chapter 4 Figurative Language. Pair students up and ask them to analyze the figurative language examples and fill out the Figurative Language graphic organizer.
  • Circulate to assist students in reading the excerpts and analyzing the figurative language. Ask:

*  "What does the figurative language mean literally?"

*  "What does the excerpt tell you about Bud?"

  • Invite students to get into triads to share their analyses.
  • Cold call students to share their analyses with the whole class. (from Lesson 2). Review the example recorded in Lesson 2 to remind students how to fill out the organizer.
  • Providing feedback specific to the learning target that identifies both a success and a next step helps students set concrete goals for reaching learning targets.
  • Providing sentence starters and sentence frames helps students develop group speaking skills and encourages them to use evidence in their claim.

B. Read-aloud of Excerpt from Chapter 4 and Completion of Selected Response Questions 
 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the blank Strategies for Answering Selected Response Questions anchor chart. Invite them to read the bullet points with you.
  • Distribute Selected Response Questions, Chapter 4 of Bud, Not Buddy. Tell students that all the questions are from an excerpt of the text on page 32.
  • Review the questions with students. Remind them that each question has multiple parts. The first part of the question asks them to identify the meaning of a word. The second part asks them to consider how that word choice affects the tone or meaning of the text.
  • Invite students to open their copies of Bud, Not Buddy to page 32. As they follow along, read aloud from "I can't all the way blame ..." to "... didn't have to put up with Todd."
  • Give students the next 10 minutes to work independently on the selected response questions.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. One way to support them in thinking about a word's effect on meaning or tone is to have them consider how the sentence would be different without that single word, or with another word in its place.
  • Asking students to provide feedback to their peers helps them clarify their learning.
  • Consider providing select students with scaffolding for Question 4 of the selected response questions by letting them know that Bud feels two different emotions about foster homes.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Discussion of Selected Response Question (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to look more closely at Question 4. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

* "What are the two feelings he has, and what does this tell us about Bud?"

* "How does this moment in the novel help us understand human beings more?"

  • Refocus the class and invite a few students to share, as time permits. Listen for comments about considering different perspectives and trying to understand each other more.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 5 of Bud, Not Buddy. Identify the rules Bud refers to in the chapter and add to the Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer. Use your evidence flags to mark any details in the text that help you think about what this rule means and how Bud uses it. 

Note: In Lesson 5, students reread an excerpt of Chapter 5, fill out a graphic organizer, and answer short constructed response questions for their mid-unit assessment. Prepare any accommodations students require to complete this assessment.

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