Analyzing Figurative Language and How the Author’s Word Choice Affects Tone and Meaning (Chapter 3) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L3

Analyzing Figurative Language and How the Author’s Word Choice Affects Tone and Meaning (Chapter 3)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can determine the meaning of literal and figurative language (metaphors and similes) in literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze how an author's word choice affects tone and meaning in a literary text. (RL.6.4)
  • I can analyze figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. (L.6.5)

Supporting Targets

  • I can explain how the author's word choice affects meaning and tone in the novel.
  • I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author's Word Choice and Tone graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Rules in Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy (6 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Analyzing Author's Word Choice, Meaning, and Tone in Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy (12 minutes)

     B. Carousel of Quotes: Figurative Language in Chapter 3 (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Carousel of Quotes Synthesis (5 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A. Read Chapter 4 of Bud, Not Buddy.

  • In this lesson, students read like a writer and analyze figurative language and the author's word choice, meaning, and tone in Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy.
  • In advance: Prepare pieces of chart paper, each with a different quote (see Carousel of Quotes: Figurative Language in Chapter 3 in the supporting materials). These charts should look identical to the Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer, with the quote provided above the three columns.
  • Review Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy, looking for word choice, meaning, and tone, to be prepared to support students as they analyze word choice, meaning, and tone in the chapter. Review the Carousel of Quotes and Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocols (see Appendix 1).
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

tone, figurative language; revenge, simmered (down) 

Materials

  • Bud, Not Buddy (book; one per student)
  • Document camera
  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (from Lesson 1)
  • Carousel of Quotes: Figurative Language in Chapter 3 (for Teacher Reference)
  • Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer (from Lesson 2)
  • Markers (a different color for each triad)
  • Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author's Word Choice, Meaning, and Tone graphic organizer (one per student and one to display)
  • Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author's Word Choice, Meaning and Tone graphic organizer (for Teacher Reference)
  • Homework: Bud, Not Buddy--Chapter 4 (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Rules in Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy (6 minutes)

  • Invite students to get into triads. Remind them that for homework they were to read Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy and fill out their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer if they came across any of Bud's rules.
  • Ask students to refer back to their Bud's Rules graphic organizer and to discuss and compare with their triads what each of them recorded for rule number 328. Encourage students to add to their graphic organizer any new thinking about the rule that they learn from peers.
  • Circulate to listen in and ensure that all students are participating in the discussion and completed their graphic organizer for homework.
  • Consider partnering ELLs who speak the same home language when discussion of complex content is required. This can allow them to have more meaningful discussions and clarify points in their native language.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you

* "I can explain how the author's word choice affects meaning and tone in the novel."

* "I can determine the meaning of figurative language in Bud, Not Buddy."

  • Remind students that they discussed tone and figurative language in the previous lesson. Define them again for the class.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing Author's Word Choice, Meaning, and Tone in Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy (12 minutes)

  • Distribute Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author's Word Choice, Meaning, and Tone graphic organizer and display using document camera.
  • Remind students that in Lesson 2 they completed selected response questions about the author's word choice and tone. Tell students they are now going to work with their triads to analyze the author's word choice, meaning, and tone in Chapter 3. They will think about how word choice conveys certain meaning and tone and helps a reader understand how the events and experiences described make the narrator feel.
  • Model with the students how to fill in the columns on the graphic organizer. See Chapter 3 of Bud, Not Buddy: Author's Word Choice, Meaning and Tone (for Teacher Reference) for an example. Invite them to read the first box on the organizer, an excerpt from pages 21 and 22, with you: "There was a gray gas can in one corner next to a bunch of gray rakes and a pile of gray rags, and a gray tire next to some gray fishing poles."
  • Ask students to discuss in their triads:

* "Why has the author used the word 'gray' repeatedly here? What does the repeated use of the word 'gray' emphasize to the reader?"

  • Cold call students to share what their triad discussed. Record an example on the displayed graphic organizer. See the example on the graphic organizer for Teacher Reference and use this as a guide.
  • Give triads 12 minutes to analyze and discuss word choice, tone, and meaning on pages 21-26 of in their copies of Bud, Not Buddy and to fill out the graphic organizer.
  • Circulate and listen in to gauge how well students are connecting the author's word choice with tone, and then how tone contributes to meaning. Ask probing questions:

* "What feeling or meaning does this word convey? Why?"

* "How would you describe the tone? Why?"

  • Refocus students whole group. Cold call a few students to share their notes about word choice, tone, and meaning with the whole group.

B. Carousel of Quotes: Figurative Language in Chapter 3 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the charts hanging around the room. Tell them that you have pulled excerpts of text from Chapter 3 that contain figurative language, specifically similes (which they discussed in the lesson opening). Review these terms as needed.
  • Tell students that they will travel around the room from chart to chart with their triad, like they're on a carousel, reading, thinking, talking, and writing about figurative language. Specifically, they will be discussing the same topics that they worked with on their Figurative Language in Bud, Not Buddy graphic organizer (during Lesson 2): Which language is figurative? What is the literal meaning? How does the figurative language reveal Bud's feelings?
  • Distribute a different color marker to each triad. Give directions:
  1. Take turns reading aloud the excerpt at the top of the chart.
  2. In your novel, find the page where the figurative language appears and read the text around it.
  3. Each member of your triad should share his or her thoughts on the three columns of the chart: What's the figurative language? What's the literal meaning? How does it affect tone?
  4. Take turns recording your thoughts on the chart.
  5. Rotate to the next chart.
  • Circulate and support triads in their discussions. Ensure that all students have a voice in the discussion.
  • Use of protocols (such as Carousel of Quotes) allows for total participation of students. It encourages critical thinking, collaboration, and social construction of knowledge. It also helps students practice their speaking and listening skills.
  • Consider posting the directions for all students to see. This will assist those who may have difficult following multistep directions.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Carousel of Quotes Synthesis (5 minutes)

  • Ask students:

* "What do you now know about how figurative language can affect tone?"

  • Invite students to spend 3 minutes considering the question while walking around the room looking at the notes triads have made on the Carousel of Quotes charts.
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face synthesis:
  1. Pair students up.
  2. Ask them to sit back-to-back.
  3. Give them 1 minute to consider the answer they are going to give to the question now that they have looked at the notes on the Carousel charts.
  4. Ask them to turn face-to-face to tell their partner the answer.
  • Distribute Homework: Bud, Not Buddy--Chapter 4.
  • Ensuring that students have opportunities to incorporate physical movement in the classroom supports their academic success. This closing activity is meant to help students synthesize their understanding of figurative language.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 4 of Bud, Not Buddy. Since there are no rules for you to analyze in this chapter, answer this question:

* "What did Bud do to Todd? Why did he do this?"

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