Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 20–23 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 10) | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M2A:U1:L10

Getting the Gist and Determining Word Meaning: Paragraphs 20–23 of Steve Jobs’ Commencement Address (and connecting to Chapter 10)

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of informational text. (RI.6.1)
  • I can use a variety of strategies to determine word meaning in informational texts. (RI.6.4)

Supporting Targets

  • I can get the gist of Paragraphs 20-23 of the Steve Jobs speech.
  • I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Annotated Steve Jobs speech
  • Exit ticket

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

     A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Rules in Chapter 10 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

     B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

     A. Listening to the Steve Jobs Speech (Paragraphs 15-26) While Reading Along (5 minutes)

     B. Getting the Gist and Vocabulary, Paragraphs 20-23 (20 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

     A. Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

     A.  Read Chapter 11 of Bud, Not Buddy.

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lessons 6 and 8. Lesson 10 is the first lesson in the final series of the two-lesson cycle and has students reading for gist and determining the meaning of unknown words from context. In Lesson 11, they dig deeper into the short extract by answering text-dependent questions.
  • In this lesson, students have greater responsibility, working in triads to determine the meaning of words and the gist without teacher modeling.
  • In advance: Read Paragraphs 15-26 of the speech, focusing on the gist. Prepare technology to play the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address from times 09:00-14:32. If this equipment is unavailable, you can read Paragraphs 15-26 aloud to the class.
  • Post: Learning targets, Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart.

Vocabulary

gist; decades, intellectual concept, destination, invention, agent, gradually, dogma, noise, intuition

Materials

  • Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer (started in Lesson 1)
  • Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs (technology to display the webpage containing the video and transcript of the Steve Jobs Commencement Address - see Teaching Notes in Lesson 6 for more information)
  • Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs: Paragraphs 20-23 Gist Note-catcher (one per student)
  • Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout (from previous lessons)
  • Glossary for Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs (from Lesson 6)
  • Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart (from Lesson 6)
  • Word-catcher (from Lesson 1)
  • Exit Ticket: "Give One Get One" (one per student) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Triad Discussion--Rules in Chapter 10 of Bud, Not Buddy (8 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in their triads.
  • Write these questions on the board. Ask students to use what they recorded on their Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer to think and then discuss:

     * "What rules did Bud refer to in Chapter 10?"

     * "What is the meaning of Bud's rule number 87?"

     * "What life experiences may have led Bud to feel this way?"

  • Circulate to listen in on triads to ensure all students are participating in the discussion and have completed their organizer for homework.
  • Reviewing the homework holds all students accountable for reading the novel and completing their homework.

B. Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Invite a student to read the learning targets:

     *"I can get the gist of Paragraphs 20-23 of the Steve Jobs speech."

     * "I can identify the meaning of unfamiliar vocabulary from the context."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

      *"How has reading the Steve Jobs speech for gist and learning new words in context helped you become a better reader of complex informational texts?"

  • Listen for students to explain that now when they approach a new complex informational text, they know to read each paragraph, annotate the gist to figure out what the text is mostly about, and read around new words to figure out what they mean from context.
  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Listening to the Steve Jobs Speech (Paragraphs 15-26) While Reading Along (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that in Lessons 6-9, they explored the first 14 paragraphs of the Steve Jobs speech and tell them that now they are going to read the final section.
  • Ask students to follow along with their copies of Stanford Commencement Address: Steve Jobs as you play 09:00-14:32 (Paragraphs 15-26) of the video of Steve Jobs' Stanford University Commencement Address without stopping.
  • Watching Steve Jobs give the speech will improve student engagement in the text and give them a deeper understanding of the meaning through his intonation and the emphasis he places on words and phrases.

B. Getting the Gist and Vocabulary, Paragraphs 20-23 (20 minutes)

  • Tell students they will read Paragraphs 20-23 for the gist, just as they did in Lessons 6 and 8.
  • Ask students to read along silently as you read them aloud. As with other read-alouds, remember that the purpose is to read the text slowly, fluently, and without interruption. Do not stop to address comprehension or vocabulary issues, as these will be addressed later and it would interrupt the flow of the text. 
  • Distribute the Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs: 20-23 Gist Note-catcher.
  • Pair students up. Invite them to reread Paragraphs 20-22, discuss the gist with their partner, write their annotations, and circle any unknown words in the speech. Paragraph 20 begins with, "This was the closest I've been..." and ends with, "...purely intellectual concept." Paragraph 21 begins with, "No one wants to die," and ends with, "...but it is quite true." Paragraph 22 begins with, "Your time is limited..." and ends with, "Everything else is secondary." Paragraph 23 begins with, "When I was young..." and ends with, "...overflowing with neat tools and great notions."
  • Remind students to use the Reading Closely: Guiding Questions handout used in Lessons 6 and 8 and the Glossary for Stanford University Commencement Address: Steve Jobs.
  • Circulate to assist students with reading and recording the gist. Look for students to have annotated something similar to these examples:

-Paragraph 20--Steve Jobs is glad he didn't die, even though he used to think about it.

-Paragraph 21--Death is going to happen. Death causes life.

-Paragraph 22--Follow your gut to do what you want in life.

-Paragraph 23--There were useful resources before computers.

  • Invite students to talk with their triad to compare what they wrote for their gist statements.
  • Refocus students whole class. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

    *"What strategies do you use to determine the meaning of unknown words?"

  • Remind students to refer to the bullet points on the Strategies for Determining Unknown Words anchor chart when encountering new and difficult vocabulary.
  • Words students may struggle with:

-Paragraph 20: decades, intellectual concept

-Paragraph 21: destination, invention, agent, gradually

  • Hearing a complex text read slowly, fluently, and without interruption or explanation promotes fluency for students. They are hearing a strong reader read the text aloud with accuracy and expression and are simultaneously looking at and thinking about the words on the printed page. Be sure to set clear expectations that students read along silently in their heads as you read the text aloud.
  • Allow students to grapple with a complex text before explicit teaching of vocabulary. After students have read for gist, they can identify challenging vocabulary for themselves.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Exit Ticket: Give One, Get One (10 minutes)

  • Distribute the exit ticket: Give One, Get One to each student.
  • Tell them that they will begin this activity independently, brainstorming character traits of Bud and Steve Jobs. They will then use this brainstorming of each person to make a list of qualities they share. Review the sections of the exit ticket, and then give students 3 to 4 minutes to work on their own.
  • Circulate and support them as they work. If they get stuck, remind them of the strategy they have used in the past: challenge, response, and inference. Thinking about how people (real or fictional) respond to challenges often reveals their character traits. Another way to determine character traits is by looking at a person's relationships with those around them.
  • After 3 to 4 minutes, tell students they will now "Give One, Get One." Students will silently travel around the room, using their recording form and gestures to share shared character traits of Bud and Steve Jobs. They will "give" one shared character trait and "get" one shared character trait each time they interact with a peer. Remind students to write down any new thinking or ideas on their own recording form, as it may inform their writing.
  • After 2 to 3 minutes of silent mingling, invite students back to their seats. Ask: 
    * "Of all the shared character traits you have thought of and collected today, which one is most important? 
     Why?"
  • Students will respond to this question at the bottom of their exit ticket. 
  • Using exit tickets allows you to quickly check for understanding of the learning target so that instruction can be adjusted or tailored to students' needs before the next lesson.

Homework

Homework
  • Read Chapter 11 of Bud, Not Buddy. Identify the rules Bud refers to in the chapter and complete your Tracking Bud's Rules graphic organizer.

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