Writing: Analyzing the Conclusion of “The Golden Key” and Drafting a Compelling Conclusion for the Hero’s Journey Narrative | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M1:U3:L6

Writing: Analyzing the Conclusion of “The Golden Key” and Drafting a Compelling Conclusion for the Hero’s Journey Narrative

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can analyze how a particular sentence, stanza, scene, or chapter fits in and contributes to the development of a literary text. (RL.6.5)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense.

    e. I can write a conclusion to my narrative that makes sense to a reader. (W.6.3)

Supporting Targets

  • I can list the similarities and differences between the conclusion of an analytical piece of writing and the conclusion of a narrative.
  • I can analyze the conclusion of the model narrative, "The Golden Key," to identify the qualities that make it compelling.
  • I can write a compelling conclusion for my hero's journey narrative.
  • I can use criteria to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between Conclusions in Analytical Writing and Narratives
  • Draft hero's journey narrative conclusion
  • What Makes the Conclusion of "The Golden Key" Compelling? note-catcher
  • Narrative Conclusion: Stars and Steps recording form

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Analyzing the Similarities and Differences between a Conclusion in Analytical Writing and Narrative Writing (10 minutes)

B.  Analyzing the Compelling Qualities of the Conclusion of the Model Narrative, "The Golden Key" (10 minutes)

C.  Drafting a Compelling Conclusion (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Peer Critique of Conclusion (10 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Use the steps from your peer critique to make revisions to your draft.
Continue independent reading.

  • In this lesson, students determine the differences between the conclusion of a piece of analytical writing and the conclusion of a narrative in order to recognize that conclusions differ in their contents according to their writing modes. Help students see that there isn't a magic formula for a universal conclusion for all modes of writing.
  • Students provide feedback to peers on the conclusions they have written. They follow the same guidelines used when doing peer critique in Unit 2, Lesson 19. Help students become familiar with the format for peer critique, which is a routine they will use throughout the year as writers.
  • As in Lessons 4 and 5, consider the setup of the classroom; if possible, students can work on computers.
  • In Advance: Review Unit 2, Lesson 19 to refamiliarize yourself with peer critique. Post a chart with the Peer Critique Guidelines (listed in the Closing and Assessment), and/or prepare a copy of the guidelines for students to keep in their folders.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

conclusion, compelling

 

Materials

  • Model Literary Analysis: Connecting Theme in Prometheus and The Lightning Thief (from Unit 2, Lesson 16)
  • Model Narrative: "The Golden Key" (from Lesson 2)
  • Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between Conclusions in Analytical Writing and Narratives (one per student and one for display)
  • What Makes the Conclusion of "The Golden Key" Compelling? note-catcher (one per student and one for display)
  • Qualities of a Compelling Narrative Conclusion anchor chart (new; teacher-created)
  • Peer Critique Guidelines (from Unit 2, Lesson 19; to post)
  • Narrative Conclusion: Stars and Steps recording form (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unpacking the Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the posted learning targets with you:

*   "I can list the similarities and differences between the conclusion of an analytical piece of writing 
and the conclusion of a narrative."

*   "I can analyze the conclusion of the model narrative, 'The Golden Key,' to identify the qualities 
that make it compelling."

*   "I can write a compelling conclusion for my hero's journey narrative."

*   "I can use criteria to provide kind, specific, and helpful feedback to my peers."

  • Ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What is a conclusion?"

*   "What does compelling mean?"

*   "What do you think you might be doing in this lesson based on these learning targets?"* You have read books by the same author and enjoyed them.

  • Learning targets are a research-based strategy that helps all students, especially challenged learners.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.

 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Similarities and Differences between a Conclusion in Analytical Writing and Narrative Writing (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that in order to write a compelling conclusion for their hero's journey, in this lesson they are going to:
  • Think about how a conclusion in a narrative differs from a conclusion in a piece of analytical writing
  • Look at the qualities that make a conclusion in a narrative compelling
  • Tell students that the informational conclusion they are going to refer to is the Model Literary Analysis: Connecting Theme in Prometheus and The Lightning Thief (from Unit 2, Lesson 16), and the narrative conclusion they are going to compare it to is the Model Narrative: "The Golden Key" (from Lesson 2 of this unit).
  • Display and distribute Venn Diagram: Similarities and Differences between Conclusions in Analytical Writing and Narratives.
  • Remind students that in a Venn diagram, the things that are similar between the two go in the middle where the circles overlap, and the things that are unique to each one go on either side, in the appropriate circle. Point this out on the displayed Venn diagram.
  • Explain that the conclusion of the informational text is the final paragraph, and the conclusion of the narrative begins with "At that, Lord Dismalt ..." and finishes at the end of the story.
  • Give the class 2 minutes to read both of the conclusions silently.
  • Invite students to get into triads to discuss the similarities and differences between the informational text conclusion and the narrative conclusion and to record their ideas on the Venn diagram.
  • Refocus the group. Call on volunteers to share their thinking about the similarities and differences between the two types of conclusions. Record ideas on the displayed Venn diagram and guide students toward these ideas if they aren't suggested:
  • Similarities:

     - Both bring the piece of writing to a satisfying end.

     - Both follow logically from the content of the rest of the text.

  • Informational texts:

*   Follow from the author's point of view and purpose. Ex.: "Starting off small in the area of recycling has great advantages to the issues we face together."

*   Include a call to action. Ex.: "Let's clean up the Earth and make change happen for the betterment and quality of life."

*  Have conclusions with a formal, objective tone and style

*  Are written in complete sentences

*  Use clear and direct language

  • Narrative texts:

*  Use transitions and transitional phrases to show shifts in time

*  Use descriptive details to show, not tell. These include dialogue, sensory language, and strong verbs.

*  Conclude with a scene from the narrative that follows logically from the scene that came before it

*  Conclude with something that leaves the reader thinking but does not call the reader to action

  • Emphasize that although both genres of writing (informational text and narrative) have what we would describe as a conclusion, the word conclusion can mean different things depending on the mode of the writing. It is important to conclude pieces of writing appropriately according to their mode. There isn't a magic formula for a conclusion that works across all kinds of text.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Careful attention to learning targets throughout a lesson engages, supports, and holds students accountable for their learning. Consider revisiting learning targets throughout the lesson so that students can connect their learning with the activity they are working on.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

B. Analyzing the Compelling Qualities of the Conclusion of the Model Narrative, "The Golden Key" (10 minutes)

  • Now explain that students will analyze the conclusion of the model narrative, "The Golden Key," looking for qualities that make it compelling in order to build a list of criteria to help them when writing their own narrative conclusions. Remind the class what the word compelling means.
  • Display and distribute the What Makes the Conclusion of "The Golden Key" Compelling? note-catcher. Point out the Qualities column and explain that students will list the qualities that make it a compelling conclusion. In the Evidence column, they will record evidence of that quality.
  • Give the class a minute to reread the conclusion, beginning at: "At that, Lord Dismalt ..." and finishing at the end of the story.
  • Ask:

*   "Is there one quality you notice immediately?"

  • Select a volunteer to share his or her answer with the whole group. Record the idea in the Quality column on the displayed note-catcher as a model.
  • Ask:

*   "So what evidence can you find of that quality?"

  • Again select a volunteer to share evidence of that quality with the whole group and record his or her idea in the Evidence column on the displayed note-catcher as a model.
  • Invite triads to follow the model to discuss and then record qualities and evidence on their note-catchers. Circulate to assist triads by asking probing questions:

*   "What makes this a compelling conclusion to the narrative?"

*   "What evidence do you have from the text of that quality?"

  • Refocus the group. Invite each triad to share a quality they have recorded, along with the evidence they have of that quality, until all of the qualities that triads have identified have been discussed.
  • Record all of the qualities triads suggest on the new Qualities of a Compelling Narrative Conclusion anchor chart.
  • The qualities should include the following:

*   Makes sense and follows on from the previous scenes

*   Brings everything that has happened to a close

*   Goes straight to the point without wandering
*   Vanquishes or transforms the evil character into a better person
*   Ends with success and survival for the hero
*   Gives the hero a warm welcome and recognition upon his or her return home

  • Graphic organizers and recording forms engage students more actively and provide scaffolding that is especially critical for learners with lower levels of language proficiency and/or learning.
  • When reviewing graphic organizers or recording forms, consider using a document camera to display them for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, especially those who are challenged.
  • Modeling provides a clear vision of the expectation for students.

C. Drafting a Compelling Conclusion (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have identified the criteria of a compelling narrative conclusion, they are going to use these criteria to draft their own narrative conclusion for their hero's journey.
  • Ask them to reread what they have written and then take 10 minutes to independently draft the conclusion.
  • Circulate to help students who may need additional support and do an observational assessment on student progress.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Peer Critique of Conclusion (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they will have an opportunity to receive peer feedback on the draft conclusion of their hero's journey stories. Tell them that the true test of the writing is whether a reader can understand what they have written. They will be readers for each other and will help by giving and receiving feedback on the conclusions so that everyone can revise to improve their narrative.
  • Remind students that they did a peer critique to provide stars and steps for their peers' literary analyses in Unit 2, so they should be familiar with how it works. Remind them that peer critiquing needs to be done carefully, because we want to be helpful to our peers so they can use our suggestions to improve their work. We don't want to make them feel bad.
  • Post and briefly review the Peer Critique Guidelines. Tell students that they are going to be using the criteria on the Qualities of a Compelling Narrative Conclusion anchor chart to critique someone else's work.
  • Emphasize that their job is to make sure their peer has followed this criteria in his or her hero's journey narrative conclusion. Distinguish peer critique from proofreading. It is fine if they catch errors in each others' work, but the goal is to make the thinking in the writing as strong as possible.
  • Tell students that they will present feedback in the form of stars and steps. Remind them that they did something similar for themselves in Unit 2. Today, they will give two "stars" and one "step."
  • Briefly model how to give two "kind, specific, helpful" stars. Be sure to connect your comments directly to the criteria on the anchor chart. For example: "Your conclusion has a satisfying ending and shows that the hero completes his/her journey."
  • Repeat, briefly modeling how to give a "kind, specific, helpful" step. For example, "Can you tell the reader what happens to the bad character?" Emphasize that it is especially important to be kind when giving steps. Often, asking a question of the writer is a good way to do this. "I wonder if ...?" or "Have you thought about ...?"
  • Distribute the Narrative Conclusion: Stars and Steps recording form. Explain that today students will record the stars and steps for their partner on this sheet so that their partner can remember the feedback he or she receives. They are to write the name of their partner at the top of their paper.
  • Invite students to mark on their drafts where their conclusion begins.
  • Pair up students. Invite pairs to swap narratives and to spend 2 minutes reading the conclusions in silence. If they think it necessary, they may like to read the whole narrative or a few paragraphs before the conclusion, just to get an idea of what happens in the story.
  • Ask students to record two stars and one step for their partner on the recording form. Circulate to assist students who may struggle with recording their feedback.
  • Ask students to return the narrative and recording form to their partner and to explain the stars and step they recorded. Invite students to question their partner if they don't understand the feedback they have been given.
  • Peer critiquing needs to be set up carefully to ensure that students feel safe both giving and receiving feedback. Students need to be given a set of clear guidelines for behavior, and they also need to see the teacher model how to do it successfully. Asking students to provide feedback to their peers based on explicit criteria benefits both students in clarifying what a strong piece of writing should look like. Students can learn from both the strengths and weaknesses that they notice in the work of peers.

Homework

Homework
  • Use the step from your peer critique to make revisions to your draft.
  • Continue independent reading.

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