“The Hero’s Journey”: Analyzing a Model Narrative and Continuing to Plan a New Hero’s Journey Narrative | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M1:U3:L2

“The Hero’s Journey”: Analyzing a Model Narrative and Continuing to Plan a New Hero’s Journey Narrative

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can describe how the plot evolves throughout a literary text. (RL.6.3)
  • I can write narrative texts about real or imagined experiences using relevant details and event sequences that make sense. (W.6.3)
  • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth- grade topics, texts, and issues. (SL.6.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can analyze the story line of the model narrative.
  • I can use "The Hero's Journey" to describe how the model narrative follows the hero's journey archetype.
  • I can use the notes on my Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer to begin to plan my own hero's journey narrative.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Exit Ticket: Hero's Profile (from Lesson 1)
  • Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer (completed with the model narrative's hero's journey)
  • Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer (completed with ideas for their own hero's journey narrative)
  • Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Continuing the Hero's Profile (5 minutes)

B.  Unpacking the Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Analyzing the Model Narrative for Content and Structure (20 minutes)

B.  Continuing to Make Notes on My Hero's Journey (5 minutes)

C.  Writing: Formalizing a Plan for My Hero's Journey Narrative (10 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Mix and Mingle: My Hero's Journey (3 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  Complete your Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer (ignore the question at the very bottom)

B.  Independent reading

  • In this lesson, students analyze a model narrative and deconstruct it using the same Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer that they used (in Lesson 1) to map out Percy Jackson's hero's journey. Students focus on the Theme box at the bottom of the graphic organizer. They use the "Key Elements of Mythology" informational text to determine the elements of mythology and a theme that is present in the model narrative.
  • Students then apply their learning from the model narrative to update their initial plans for their own hero's journey narratives.
  • Students transition from the Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer to the more formal Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer, which will help them begin to organize their initial notes and thinking in preparation to write their narrative.
  • Students do not actually write their narrative in this lesson, but the lesson addresses W.6.3 because they plan the hero character, context, and events in their hero's journey story.
  • Students have spent a lot of time getting to know the NYS Writing Rubric, as this rubric is used throughout the entire year. Due to time constraints, students do not spend time during a lesson studying the rubric for narrative writing. Instead, students get to know the criteria of this project through a close study of the model narrative. A rubric for grading the "My Hero's Journey Narrative" is part of Unit 3, Lesson 7 supporting materials.
  • Post: Learning targets.

Vocabulary

analyze, archetype

 

Materials

  • Model narrative: "The Golden Key" (one per student and one for display)
  • "The Hero's Journey" (from Unit 1)
  • Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer (from Lesson 1; new blank copy for students' use in this lesson)
  • "Key Elements of Mythology" (from Unit 2, Lesson 4)
  • Thinking about Elements of Story and Theme checklist (optional: for students needing more support)
  • Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Continue the Hero Profile (5 minutes)

  • Distribute the Exit Ticket: Hero's Profile students began in Unit 3, Lesson 1. Tell them they will have the first 5 minutes of class today to work on their Hero's Profile and complete any components they may not have finished in the previous lesson.
  • Circulate and support students as they work. One way to help students in creating characters is to encourage them to use individual features from people they know in their real lives. This can help them think of both physical features and character details such as hobbies, likes, and dislikes.
  • Posting learning targets allows students to reference them throughout the lesson to check their understanding. They also provide a reminder to students and teachers about the intended learning behind a given lesson or activity.
  • Discussing and clarifying the language of learning targets helps build academic vocabulary.

 

B. Unpacking the Learning Targets (2 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole class and refer to the posted learning targets. Invite students to read them with you:

*   "I can analyze the story line of the model narrative."

*   "I can use 'The Hero's Journey' to describe how the model narrative follows the hero's journey 
 archetype."

*   "I can use the notes on my Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer to begin to 
 plan my own hero's journey narrative."

  • Circle the words analyze and narrative. Discuss their meaning. Ask:

*   "How do these learning targets link to what you did in the previous lesson?"

*   "So to achieve these targets, what do you think you are going to be doing today that builds on 
 your learning yesterday?"

  • Call on a few volunteers to share their ideas. Listen for students to suggest that they are going to analyze a model narrative based on "The Hero's Journey" informational text to see how it tells the story of a hero's journey.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Analyzing the Model Narrative for Content and Structure (20 minutes)

  • Remind students that they have already begun to think about their own hero's journey narrative. Tell them that today they are going to analyze a model narrative to give them a deeper understanding of how to turn their ideas into a story.
  • Display and distribute Model Narrative: "The Golden Key." Invite students to read silently in their heads as you read it aloud.
  • Ask students to consider the content. Invite them to Think-Pair-Share each of these questions:

*   "So who was the hero in this story?"

*   "What did she have to do? Why?"

*   "What happened at the end?"

  • Ask students to take out the informational text "The Hero's Journey" (which they used the previous lesson).
  • Direct their attention to "Act 1: Separation." Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "So what is the call to adventure for this hero?"

*   "What unknown does the hero enter into?"

  • Ask students to refer to "Act 2: Initiation and Transformation" and Think-Pair-Share:

*   "Who are the hero's helpers?"

*   "What is the supreme ordeal that she faces?"

  • Ask students to refer to "Act 3: The Return" and Think-Pair-Share:

*   "How does being a hero change her life when she returns?"

  • Distribute a new fresh copy of the Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer. Tell students that they will now refer to the model and make notes on the organizer, just like the author of the model would have done to plan his or her writing. Tell them that the author of the model narrative probably used an organizer much like this one to note initial ideas. (Alternatively, students could annotate the actual model, jotting notes about the hero's journey in the margins of the narrative.)
  • Give students 5 minutes in pairs to discuss the narrative story line of the model narrative, "The Golden Key," and make notes on the organizer about how the model follows the hero's journey archetype. Tell them that at this stage, they don't need to fill out the Theme box at the bottom of the organizer.

*   Refocus the whole group. Select volunteers to share their ideas with the class. Discuss and record student ideas on the displayed organizer.

  • Providing models of expected work supports all learners, but especially those who are challenged.
  • It is important to give students time to process the content of the model before they move on to analyzing structure. They need to get to know it as a story before studying it for its craft.
  • Pairing ELLs with other students who speak the same home language allows them to focus on the complex ideas of a text.
  • Consider giving select students partially filled-in Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizers. This will allow them to focus on the important ideas of the model.

B. Continuing to Make Notes on My Hero's Journey (8 minutes)

  • Tell students that now that they have analyzed a model narrative, they are going to spend time updating their notes and ideas on their organizer for their hero's journey stories based on any new thinking and learning. Invite them to focus particularly on the Theme box at the bottom of the organizer. Ask them to take out their "Key Elements of Mythology" informational text (from Unit 2). Remind students that they used this document in Unit 2 to help determine themes of the myths they read. Ask students to use the "Key Elements of Mythology" to determine which elements of myth and which significant theme they are going to communicate in their hero's journey narratives.
  • Remind students that this is time for them to continue thinking about ideas and taking notes for their hero's journey story. They are not to begin writing, and this is not yet a formal plan for their hero's journey narrative.
  • Circulate to ask questions to guide students:

*    "Who is your character?"

*   *     "What is the call to adventure for your hero? How does your hero find out that he or she needs to go on a quest?"

*   *     "What is the quest? What has he or she been asked to do?"

*   *     "Who does your hero go on the journey with?"

*   *     "Where do they go?"

*   *     "What obstacles do they encounter?"

*   *     "What is the supreme ordeal? What is the big obstacle that your hero has to overcome at the end of the journey?"

*   *     "What happens at the end? How is peace restored?"

*   *     What are the elements of myth you might include in your story?"

*   *     "What will the theme of your story be?"

  • As time permits, invite students to pair up to share their revised ideas for a hero's journey story.
  • Now share your thinking as you paraphrase the description: "This is saying that before I begin reading, I need to think about why I am reading the text. Am I reading for entertainment? Am I reading to learn something new? Am I reading to gather information on a topic that I am researching?"
  • Paraphrasing helps all students understand what they read. It is useful for all learners, but particularly for ELLs or other students who struggle.

 

C. Writing: Formalizing a Plan for My Hero's Journey Narrative (10 minutes)

  • Tell students: Now that they have recorded a lot of notes and ideas about their hero's journey story on their Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer, they are going to begin to structure those ideas more formally on an organizer that will help them turn their ideas into writing. Emphasize the difference: The Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey organizer was just for initial thinking and ideas. But now they are actually going to be thinking about how those notes and ideas can be used to write a narrative like "The Golden Key."
  • Display and distribute the Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer. Ask:

*   "What do you notice?"

*   "What do you wonder?"

  • If students don't notice it, point out that each row of the Stage of the Hero's Journey column connects to "The Hero's Journey" informational text and the Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer.
  • Invite the class to read each of the column headings with you. Focus on the middle column and ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What information do you think you will need to record in the My Hero's Journey column?"

  • Listen for: "We need to answer the guiding questions in the first column by using our notes to organize the events in our stories that apply to each row of the chart."
  • Ask students to consider how the author of "The Golden Key" would have filled out the first row of the first column. Ask them to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "How do we meet the hero in 'The Golden Key'?"

*   "Where does the hero's journey begin?"

  • Listen to student responses and record on the displayed graphic organizer as a model. For example: "The author describes the farm she lives on." And: "Her journey begins in the middle of the night when she decides to go get the golden key."
  • Focus on the right-hand column. Tell students that writer's craft is the series of decisions and writing moves authors make to better communicate their ideas with their readers. Writer's craft includes but is not limited to: word choice, strong leads, meaningful details, figurative language, and endings that provide closure. Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "So what do you think you need to record in this column?"

  • Listen for: "Ways to make the story grab the reader and be something that the reader doesn't want to put down."
  • Explain that students are to ignore this column for now, as they will be filling that in after some writing mini lessons later on in the unit.
  • Invite students to begin organizing their hero's journey notes from their Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer to the My Hero's Journey column of their new Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer.
  • Circulate to ask students the questions in the first column of the graphic organizer:

*    ""How do we meet your hero?"

*   "Where does your hero's journey begin?"

*   "What happens to set your hero on his or her journey?"

*   "What is the new world your hero enters?"

*   "Who is going to help your hero on the journey?"

*   "How does your hero meet these helpers?"

*   "What are some obstacles your hero and allies must overcome?"

*   "What is the climax/supreme ordeal of your hero's journey?"

*   "How does your hero get home?"

  • "What happens once the hero is home?" If students don't notice it, point out that each row of the Stage of the Hero's Journey column connects to "The Hero's Journey" informational text and the Narrative Story Line--Hero's Journey graphic organizer.
  • Invite the class to read each of the column headings with you. Focus on the middle column and ask students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "What information do you think you will need to record in the My Hero's Journey column?"

  • Tell students that they will complete the My Hero's Journey column of their graphic organizer for homework.
  • Remind them to ignore the final column about writer's craft and the question at the bottom, as they will come back to this question in the next lesson.she lives on." And: "Her journey begins in the middle of the night when she decides to go get the golden key."
  • Selected-response questions challenge students to infer in a context where they have to read very carefully and to verify answers with specific text details.

 

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Mix and Mingle: My Hero's Journey (5 minutes)

  • Give students 2 minutes to think about how to tell someone the plot of their hero's journey in no more than three sentences.
  • Mix and Mingle:
  1. Play music and invite students to move around to the music.
  2. Stop the music after 15 seconds.
  3. Tell students to stop and tell their hero's journey story to the person closest to them in no more than three sentences.
  4. Repeat until students have spoken to three people.

Homework

Homework
  • Complete your Hero's Journey Narrative: Plan graphic organizer
  • Independent reading.

Note: Be ready to return students' End of Unit 2 Assessments in Lesson 4. Provide "stars" (positive feedback) and "steps" (specific helpful suggestions).

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