End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Final Draft of Literary Analysis | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA 2012 G6:M1:U2:L20

End of Unit Assessment, Part 2: Final Draft of Literary Analysis

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Long Term Learning Targets

  • I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. (RL.6.1)
  • I can write informative/explanatory texts that convey ideas and concepts using relevant information that is carefully selected and organized. (W.6.2)
  • I can use correct grammar and usage when writing or speaking. (L.6.1)

Supporting Targets

  • I can use my draft to write a final, best version of a literary analysis describing how the theme is communicated in the myth, how the theme is communicated in The Lightning Thief, and how the myth contributes to the theme in the novel.
  • I can self-assess my end of unit literary analysis against the NYS Writing Rubric.

Ongoing Assessment

  • Final literary analysis

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1.  Opening

A.  Unpacking Learning Targets (2 minutes)

2.  Work Time

A.  Reading NYS Writing Rubric--Row 4 (10 minutes)

B.  Writing a Final Draft of a Literary Analysis (25 minutes)

3.  Closing and Assessment

A.  Self-Assessing against the NYS Writing Rubric (8 minutes)

4.  Homework

A.  The Lightning Thief: How is Percy a Hero? Answer the question using evidence from the novel to support your ideas.

  • In previous lessons, students have drafted and revised a literary analysis. In this lesson, students write their final, best version of their draft and self-assess their final version against the NYS Writing Rubric. They conclude this unit by sharing something they are proud of from their work with myths and their practice writing literary analyses.
  • If technology is available, students could be given the option to word process their literary analyses.
  • Post: Learning targets, end of unit assessment prompt.

Vocabulary

self-assessing; control of conventions, demonstrates command, capitalization, punctuation, error, hinder

 

Materials

  • NYS Writing Rubric--Row 4 (one per student)
  • The Lightning Thief word catcher (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 1)
  • End of Unit 2 assessment prompt (from Lesson 12; provided again in this lesson for ease of reference)
  • The Lightning Thief (book; one per student)
  • Model Literary Analysis: "Connecting Themes in Prometheus and The Lightning Thief (from Lesson 14; one per student)
  • Structure of a Literary Analysis anchor chart (from Lesson 14)
  • Stars and Steps recording form (from Lesson 19; students completed this during Peer Critique)
  • NYS Writing Rubric (Introduced in Lesson 12. One per student - a clean copy for students to use for their self-assessment)
  • Homework: The Lightning Thief: How Is Percy a Hero? (one per student)

Opening

Opening

A. Unpacking Learning Target (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to read the learning targets with you:

*   "I can use my draft to write a final, best version of a literary analysis describing how the theme is communicated in the myth, how the theme is communicated in The Lightning Thief, and how the myth contributes to the theme in the novel."

*   "I can self-assess my end of unit literary analysis against the NYS Writing Rubric."

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share:

*   "So now that you have seen the learning target for this lesson, what do you think you will be doing today? Why?"

  • Listen for: "Writing a final, best version of our literary analyses and self-assessing it against the NYS Writing Rubric."

*   "What does self-assessing mean?"

  • Listen for: "Determining how well we think we have done using the rubric."

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading NYS Writing Rubric--Row 4 (10 minutes)

  • Display and distribute NYS Writing Rubric--Row 4. Read the criteria box aloud as students follow along silently. Ask students to discuss in triads and then share with the group:

"Are there any words you don't recognize that you think you might need to know to figure out what this criteria means?"

  • Discuss words the students highlight as well as the key academic vocabulary below. Ask students to have a quick 30-second discussion in their triad, and then cold call groups to share their suggestions:

*   What does control of conventions mean? Well, what are conventions? So what is control of conventions?"

*   "What does demonstrates command mean? If you can command something, what does that mean?"

*   "What are the conventions of standard English grammar?"

*   "What is capitalization?"

*   "What is punctuation?"

  • Remind students to record new vocabulary on their The Lightning Thief word catcher.
  • Invite students to discuss in triads and then share with the group:

*   "So now that you know what the key academic vocabulary means, what does the whole thing mean? How would you paraphrase it?"

  • Listen for: "How well grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization have been used."
  • Invite students to paraphrase this on their own sheet.
  • Remind students that Column 3 is a good literary essay and Column 4 is a great literary essay, and label the columns with "Good" and "Great" headings at the top. Invite students to do the same.
  • Read aloud the content of Column 3 as students read along silently. Ask students to discuss in their triads and share:

*   "Are there any words you don't recognize that you think you might need to know to figure out what this criteria means?"

  • Discuss words the students highlight as well as the key academic vocabulary below. Ask students to have a quick 30-second discussion in their triad, and then cold call groups to share their suggestions:

*    "What does appropriate command of conventions mean?"

*   "What does occasional errors mean?"

*   "What does not hinder comprehension mean?"

  • Remind students to record new vocabulary on their word catcher.
  • Invite students to discuss in their triads and share with the whole group:

*   So now that you know what the key academic vocabulary means, what does the whole thing mean? How would you paraphrase it?"

  • Listen for: "There aren't many grammar mistakes."
  • Invite students to paraphrase this on their sheet.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share to compare the good and great columns (under numbers 3 and 4):

*   "What is different about these columns?"

*   "What do you have to do to get a 'great'?"

  • Listen for: "To get a great, there should be very few grammar, punctuation, or spelling mistakes."
  • Invite triads to discuss what the key words are that make the difference between a literary essay being good and great.
  • Listen for: "Few errors."
  • Highlight/circle those words on the display copy and invite students to do the same. Remind students that they have focused specifically on using sentence variety and correct use of pronouns, so they should focus their revisions there.
  • When reading the row of the rubric, consider using a document camera to visually display the document for students who struggle with auditory processing.
  • Asking students to identify challenging vocabulary helps them to monitor their understanding of a complex text. When students annotate the text by circling these words, it can also provide a formative assessment for the teacher.
  • To further support ELLs, consider providing definitions of challenging vocabulary in students' home language. Resources such as Google Translate and bilingual translation dictionaries can assist with one-word translation.
  • ELLs may be unfamiliar with more vocabulary words than are mentioned in this lesson. Check for comprehension of general words that most students would know.

B. Writing a Final Draft of a Literary Analysis (25 minutes) 

  • Give students specific positive praise on actions you have seen them taking as they have thought about, planned, drafted, critiqued, and revised. For example: "I have been so pleased to see many of you revising some of your sentences with pronouns to make sure they are clear rather than confusing." Tell them that they are now at the end of the writing process and are going to write a final, best version of their literary analysis.
  • Display the end of unit assessment prompt (from Lesson 12):

*   "What is a theme that connects the myth of Cronus and The Lightning Thief? After reading the myth of Cronus and the novel The Lightning Thief, write a literary analysis in which you do the following:

*   Summarize the myth and present a theme that connects the myth and the novel.

*   Describe how the theme is communicated in the myth.

*   Describe how the theme is communicated in The Lightning Thief.

*   Explain why myths still matter and why the author may have chosen to include this myth in the novel.

  • Remind students that they can use all their resources as they prepare their final draft:

*   The Lightning Thief

*   Model Literary Analysis: Themes in Prometheus and The Lightning Thief

*   Structure of a Literary Analysis anchor chart

*   Peer critique stars and steps

*   NYS Writing Rubric

  • Remind students that because this is an assessment, they will write their final draft version of their literary analysis independently. Ask them to begin.  Circulate to observe.

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Self-Assessing against the NYS Writing Rubric (8 minutes)

  • Distribute a new NYS Writing Rubric for students to use for self-assessing their literary analysis. Invite them to "think like the teacher" and to go through each row of the rubric highlighting/underlining where they think their literary analysis fits best and underlining parts of their literary analysis that show evidence of the criteria in the rubric.
  • Collect students' literary analyses, self-assessments, drafts, and peer critique forms.
  • Distribute Homework: The Lightning Thief: How Is Percy a Hero?

Homework

Homework
  • The Lightning Thief: How is Percy a Hero? Answer the question using evidence from the novel to support your ideas.

 

Note: Be prepared to return students' mid-unit assessment mini-essays in Lesson 14. In your scoring, focus on Rows 1 and 2 of the NYS Writing Rubric, as those are the most important rows in terms of helping students begin to write effectively with evidence. Students will be familiar with both of those rows by Lesson 14.

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