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ELA GK:M2:U3:L4

Reading, Speaking, and Writing: The Snowy Day Focused Read-aloud and Drawing the Events of My Weather Story

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.3: With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.
  • W.K.3: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to narrate a single event or several loosely linked events, tell about the events in the order in which they occurred, and provide a reaction to what happened.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can identify the major events in the text The Snowy Day. (RL.K.3)
  • I can draw the major events of my weather story. (W.K.3)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, observe if students are able to correctly identify the major events in The Snowy Day. Use the Reading Literature checklist to track students’ progress toward RL.K.3.
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen in as students role-play the major events of their weather story with a partner. Notice if students can verbalize the major events in their weather story using the character puppet. (RL.K.3, L.K.6)
  • During Work Time C, circulate as students draw the major events. Notice if students can show the major events using detailed pictures illustrating the character’s actions. (W.K.3, RL.K.3)
  • During the Closing, listen as students share reflections about perseverance with the whole group. Notice any specific students for whom whole group sharing is a challenge.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: “Sofia Says” Game (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud: The Snowy Day, Pages 3–4, 15–18 (10 minutes)

B. Role Play: Major Story Events (15 minutes)

C. Preparing for Independent Writing: Drawing Major Story Events (25 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • As in Lessons 2–3, students focus on one story element throughout the focused read-aloud of The Snowy Day. In this lesson, the focus is on major events. The now familiar routine of identifying this story element in The Snowy Day, using role play to brainstorm major events in students’ weather stories, and then drawing the major events in their My Weather Story booklet, scaffolds the writing process as students learn to write a story.
  • In the Closing, students revisit the habit of character of perseverance through a whole group share. Students share how they have noticed a classmate showing perseverance during the lesson. The purpose is to build community as students learn and work alongside one another.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students continue to draw illustrations in their My Weather Story booklet, adding the major events of their story on pages 2–4 during Work Time C.
  • Continue to use Goal 1–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During Work Time C, students are given the task to draw three major story events for their weather stories. This may present a challenge for slow workers or students who enjoy drawing in great detail. For those students, consider setting aside an additional work time for them to complete their illustrations.

Down the road:

  • By the end of Lesson 5, students should complete the illustrations in their My Weather Story booklet so they are ready to begin adding writing in Lessons 6–9.

In Advance

  • Pre-distribute materials for Work Time C at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Post: Learning targets, enlarged version of My Weather Story booklet, Rainy Day chart, Snowy Day chart, Hot Day chart, Windy Day chart, Conversation Partners chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded participating in the Think-Pair-Share protocol or role-playing in previous units, consider replaying these recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Students complete their My Weather Story booklet using word-processing software— for example, a Google Doc.
  • Students use Speech to Text facilities activated on devices, or using an app or software such as Dragon Dictation.
  • Students use drawing apps or software to draw their events—for example, the Kids Doodle plug-in for Google or app for Apple products.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.6 and K.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the use of the expert meteorologist charts students created in Lesson 1, the use of drawing to plan writing, and the use of a teacher model to demonstrate the task of creating major story events for their weather stories.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to think about three major story events for their weather stories. Consider using the expert weather charts for them to complete their illustrations.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • For ELLs: When reviewing the information about major events recorded on The Snowy Day anchor chart, invite a more proficient student to read the information on the chart out loud to the class.

For heavier support:

  • When unpacking the learning target, refer to the major events of familiar stories students have read so far in this unit (Come On, Rain!, Umbrella, One Hot Summer Day, and Brave Irene). Create a chart titled “Major Events” and place three or four reduced-size color copies of major events in each story, by the corresponding title of each story, to help students identify the major events in each.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Some students may need additional support with thinking about the steps an author takes to highlight major events. You can provide options for comprehension by highlighting critical pieces of information that Ezra Jack Keats included in pictures and text of The Snowy Day as he introduced major events such as Peter sliding down the mountain of snow.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students continue to role-play with their character puppets. Some students may need additional peer support to generate ideas for major events with their puppets. Provide options for expression and communication by telling students they can support their partners by “interviewing” their partner’s puppet.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): When being introduced to games that include an aspect of competition, such as in “Sofia Says,” some students may feel nervous or frustrated about getting “out.” Create an accepting and supportive environment by reviewing strategies for managing feelings when you get “out” in “Sofia Says.”

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • major, event (L)

Materials

  • Sofia paper doll (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • The Snowy Day (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • The Snowy Day anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during Work Time A)
  • The Snow Day anchor chart (from Lesson 2; for teacher reference)
  • The Snowy Day images (from Lesson 2; for teacher reference)
  • My Weather Story booklet (from Lesson 2; pages 2–4; one for teacher modeling and one per student)
  • Character puppets (from Lesson 2; one per student)
  • Expert meteorologist charts (from Lesson 1; one of each to display)
    • Rainy Day chart
    • Snowy Day chart
    • Hot Day chart
    • Windy Day chart
  • Model character puppet (from Lesson 2; one for teacher modeling)
  • Conversation Partners chart (from Module 1; one to display)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 7)
  • Crayons (one set for teacher modeling and one set per groups of four to five students)
  • Perseverance anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 7)
  • Rainbow cheer (from Unit 2, Lesson 13; for teacher reference)
  • Lightning cheer (from Unit 2, Lesson 1; for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: “Sofia Says” Game (5 minutes)

  • Gather students in the whole group meeting area.
  • Display the Sofia paper doll. Tell students they are going to play the “Sofia Says” game again and briefly review the rules as necessary, focusing on particular areas of challenge from yesterday’s game.
  • Invite students to stand up safely and quietly, leaving space for others around them.
  • Play a round of “Sofia Says,” calling out various movements related to the weather:
    • Carrying an umbrella
    • Making a snowball
    • Splashing your boots in a puddle
    • Catching a snowflake on your tongue
    • Putting on sunglasses
    • Flying a kite
    • Swimming in a pool
    • Making a snow angel
    • Licking an ice cream cone
  • Instruct students to sit in their whole group spot again.
  • Ask:

“What other weather movements could we make when we play ‘Sofia Says’?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite several students to share out. Consider recording students’ ideas about movements related to the weather ideas to use in subsequent games.
  • Remind students that yesterday, they drew the setting and weather of their story. Today, they will think about all the things characters can do in the weather, just like the movements in this game.
  • When reviewing the rules for “Sofia Says,” create an accepting and supportive environment by reviewing strategies for managing feelings when you get “out.” Example: “Yesterday we discussed some things you can do if you feel sad or mad about getting out of the game. Who can remind us what you might think if you start to feel that way?” (We are playing the game for fun, so it’s okay if you don’t win; we will play the game again so you’ll have another chance; everyone makes mistakes.) (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider inviting an ELL to call out various movements related to the weather during “Sofia Says.”

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud: The Snowy Day, Pages 3–4, 15–18 (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can identify the major events in the text The Snowy Day.”

  • Review the definition of major (very important) and event (something that happens).
  • Ask:

“What do you think this learning target means?” (It means we will name the very important things that happen in the text The Snowy Day.)

  • Invite a few students to share out.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Share that there are many events in the text The Snowy Day. Today, students will record three of the major, or very important, events that happen in the text.
  • Display a copy of The Snowy Day and The Snowy Day anchor chart.
  • While still displaying the text, read aloud pages 3–4 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“On these pages, what major event happens?” (Peter puts on his snowsuit.)

  • As a few students share, use pictures and words to clarify and capture their ideas idea in the event #1 section on The Snowy Day anchor chart. (Example: Post a picture of Peter in his red snowsuit and label “Peter put on his red snowsuit.”)
  • While still displaying the text, read aloud pages 15–16.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“On these pages, what major event happens?” (Peter makes a snowman and a snow angel.)

  • As a few students share, use pictures and words to clarify and capture their ideas in the event #2 section of The Snowy Day anchor chart. Refer to The Snowy Day anchor chart (for teacher reference) and The Snowy Day images (for teacher reference) as necessary. (Example: Post a picture of Peter making a snowman and snow angel and label “Peter made a snowman and a snow angel.”)
  • While still displaying the text, read aloud pages 17–18.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“On this page, what major event happens?” (Peter slides down the mountain of snow.)

  • As students share, use pictures and words to clarify and capture their ideas on the event #3 section of The Snowy Day anchor chart. (Example: Post a picture of Peter sliding down a mountain and label “Peter slid down the mountain.”)
  • Briefly review the information about major events recorded on The Snowy Day anchor chart.
  • If productive, cue students with a challenge:

“Can you figure out why we are reading The Snowy Day and finding major events? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (to help us write our stories)

  • Remind students that they are using The Snowy Day as a mentor text. Just like there are major events in The Snowy Day, they will create major events in their own weather stories. Tell them that now it is time to use their character puppets to role-play major events.
  • As students share examples of major events in in The Snowy Day, support comprehension by highlighting critical aspects of the text that help the reader know what the major events are. Ask:
    • “What did the author, Ezra Jack Keats, do to help us know that Peter climbing up the mountain of snow and sliding down was a major event?” (He used two entire pages to tell this part; the picture is focused only on Peter climbing and sliding.) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Some students may be confused about why the event being recorded is “Peter put on his snowsuit” as opposed to “Peter ran outside,” which is what the illustration shows more clearly. Help students make the connection to the snowsuit by asking: “What did Peter need to do before he went outside?”
  • For ELLs: Briefly remind students that The Snowy Day is a mentor text, and that a mentor text helps us as writers. Remind students of the meaning of mentor (a coach or teacher), and share that the author of this text, Ezra Jack Keats, is a mentor for students because he is an excellent writer and they can use this text, The Snowy Day, to learn how to write their own weather story.

B. Role Play: Major Story Events (15 minutes)

  • Distribute My Weather Story booklets and character puppets.
  • Share that now, students will use their character puppets to role-play major events for their stories. This will be challenging work and students should watch for their classmates to persevere through this work.
  • Refer to the posted Rainy Day chart, Snowy Day chart, Hot Day chart, and Windy Day chart.
  • Briefly review the Activities to Do section on each chart to help students consider appropriate major events for their weather story.
  • Invite students to look at their My Weather Story booklet to remember the kind of weather they are writing about, and then to point to the expert meteorologist chart (from Lesson 1) that matches the weather in their story.
  • Direct students’ attention to the displayed My Weather Story booklet.
  • Model using the model character puppet to role-play three major events for the My Weather Story booklet:
  1. Think aloud about the kind of weather story you are writing. (Example: “I am writing a story called ‘The Hot Day.’ I will use the Hot Day chart to help me to brainstorm ideas for major events.”)
  2. Role-play three major events using the example character puppet. (Example: “Fernando puts on shorts and a t-shirt. Fernando eats ice cream. Fernando plays in the sprinkler in his yard.”)
  • Referring to the Conversation Partners chart, invite students to partner up with their pre-determined talking partner and sit facing each other. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to role-play three major events for their weather stories using their character puppets. Circulate and listen in. As needed, assist students in using the Rainy Day chart, Snowy Day chart, Hot Day chart, and Windy Day chart to get ideas for events.
  • After 3–4 minutes, refocus students whole group.
  • Invite several students to role-play the major events of their story in front of the whole group. Consider selecting students who are able to model verbalizing three clear events for their stories.
  • Share that now, students will record these events by drawing them in their My Weather Story booklet.
  • As students role-play with their character puppets, provide options for expression and communication by inviting students to use their puppets to “interview” their partner’s puppet about the major events. (Example: “When my partner is role-playing the three major events with her puppet, I can use my puppet to ask questions and make suggestions. This could help my partner think of ideas to tell me. For example, my puppet could ask my partner’s puppet what happens first on a hot day.”) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Before students partner up, ensure they understand that they need to use the weather chart that matches their story when they role-play the major events of their story. Consider inviting all students to share with an elbow partner what the weather in their story is, and which chart they will be using, by pointing to it.
  • For ELLs: Have students who are invited to share at the end of this session also identify the weather chart they used and how they used it. This can help others understand how the charts can be used since they will be used throughout the writing of their story. (Example: “I used the Rainy Day chart to think about something my character could wear.”)

C. Preparing for Independent Writing: Drawing Major Story Events (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can draw the major events of my weather story.”

  • Share that this target is similar to the first learning target, except that now students will draw the major events of their own weather story.
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and to take aim at the target.
  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and read the third line aloud:
    • “Use details in your drawings.”
  • Share that this part of high-quality work is very important today because drawing with details will help the reader understand what the characters are doing in students’ weather stories.
  • Direct students’ attention to the teacher model of the My Weather Story booklet.
  • Display page 1 and review by reading the text aloud:
    • “One morning (Fernando) woke up and looked out the window. It was going to be a (hot) day.”
  • Turn to page 2. Model adding a drawing of the first event:
  1. Think aloud about the event you would like to draw. (Example: “Hmm, I think I will draw Fernando wearing shorts and a t-shirt so he can go play outside in the hot sunshine.”)
  2. Draw a picture of this event using crayons. Think aloud as you draw, including details. (Example: “I am drawing Fernando in blue shorts and a yellow t-shirt.  I will make the shirt have short sleeves because it is hot.”)
  • Turn to page 3. Model adding a drawing of the second event:
  1. Think aloud about the event you would like to draw. (Example: “Hmm, I think I will draw Fernando eating ice cream he got from the corner bodega.”)
  2. Draw a picture of this event using crayons. Think aloud as you draw, including details. (Example: “I am drawing Fernando eating ice cream. I will make it an ice cream sandwich with little brown dots for chocolate chips. I will draw the bodega door and window, too.”)
  • Turn to page 4. Model adding a drawing of the third event:
  1. Think aloud about the event you would like to draw. (Example: “I think I will draw Fernando playing in the sprinkler in his yard.”)
  2. Draw a picture of this event using crayons. Think aloud as you draw, including details. (Example: “I am drawing Fernando getting his feet wet in the sprinkler. I will make water shooting up using my blue crayon. I will draw Fernando without his shoes on.”)
  • Invite students to walk safely to their workspace and open their My Weather Story booklet to page 2 to begin drawing the major events using crayons. Remind students that they may draw the events on pages 2, 3, and 4 of their booklet.
  • Give students 10–12 minutes to draw. As they work, circulate and engage with students. Consider prompting students by asking:

“What are the major events in your story?”

“What details have you included in your drawing?”

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup procedures, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • When cleanup is complete, refocus students whole group and invite them to walk safely to the whole group meeting area.
  • When modeling how to draw the events, support strategy development by showing students how to outline shapes of the character’s body (e.g., head, t-shirt, arms, shorts, legs, feet) before coloring in. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Some students might not see the purpose of the modeling or may be confused about why the teacher is doing the work and talking to herself. Consider clarifying this by naming the purpose of the modeling and their role during the modeling. Examples:
    • “Now I am going to model for you how I draw the major events in my weather story.” Point to the learning target. “I will model this to show you how you can do this yourself later. Your job is to look closely and notice what I am doing.”
    • “I am going to be thinking out loud about what I am doing as I draw the first event in my story. This can help you see what I am thinking about as I draw. I am going to ask you later what you noticed when I was thinking out loud to myself.”
    • “What did you notice me thinking about as I drew?” (the event, what the character is eating or wearing, where the character is, etc.)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Perseverance anchor chart.
  • Share that you have noticed many students showing perseverance in their work today.
  • Ask:

“Did you also notice any classmates showing perseverance in their work today?”

  • Invite students to show a thumbs-up or touch their forehead if they noticed a classmate showing perseverance in their work today.
  • Post a sentence frame:
    • “I noticed ____ showing perseverance today by ______.”
  • As time permits, invite many students to share about a classmate’s perseverance with the whole group.
  • Remind students that they have learned some weather cheers: the Rainbow cheer and the Lightning cheer.
  • Lead students in performing these cheers to celebrate their perseverance in creating high-quality work.
  • For ELLs: It might be challenging for students to use the language on the Perseverance anchor chart (e.g., “I challenge myself”) in the sentence frame “I noticed ____ showing perseverance today by _____.” After letting students grapple, consider demonstrating using the sentence frame and having them repeat it.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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