Reading, Speaking, and Writing: Planning for the Weather | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M2:U1:L11

Reading, Speaking, and Writing: Planning for the Weather

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.K.2: With prompting and support, identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • L.K.5: With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about planning for the weather using the text Weather. (RI.K.1, RI.K.2, L.K.5)
  • I can talk about planning for different kinds of weather with my classmates. (SL.K.1, L.K.5)
  • I can use pictures and words to teach my reader a fact about planning for the weather. (W.K.2, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the Opening, monitor students’ ability to participate in the Interactive Word Wall protocol in a small group setting. As needed, re-model the steps of the protocol for small groups. (SL.K.1a, L.K.5)
  • During Work Time A, listen for students to ask and answer questions about planning for the weather using the text Weather (National Geographic Readers). (RI.K.1, RI.K.2)
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to answer the question about planning for the weather using information from the text read aloud in Work Time A or the Planning for the Weather Facts chart. (L.K.6) Continue to encourage students to use detail when answering the Science Talk question, using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor students’ progress toward SL.K.1, specifically SL.K.1a.
  • During Work Time C, circulate and observe students as they draw and write a planning for the weather fact. Continue to observe students’ improving abilities to communicate a fact clearly using pictures and words. (W.K.2, L.K.6)
  • During the Closing, listen for students to share an observation about a classmate showing responsibility using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. (SL.K.1, SL.K.1a, SL.K.6)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 4: Weather, Pages 28–29 (10 minutes)

B. Science Talk: How Do We Plan for the Weather? (15 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Planning for the Weather Fact Page (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal (5 minutes)

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • As students’ knowledge about weather increases, they now consider its impact on their daily lives. In this lesson, students consider the idea of planning for the weather every day. This idea is central in the excerpt from Weather (National Geographic Readers) read aloud. In the class weather journal, two new steps are introduced, planning what to wear and planning what to do. These steps help students make connections between the general concept of planning and weather in their daily lives.
  • This concept of planning ties into one of the unit guiding questions: “How can I be prepared for any type of weather?” (SL.K.1, SL.K.1b, L.K.6)

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 9–10, students experienced a modified whole group version of the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Today, students experience this protocol in a small group setting as formally intended.
  • As in Lessons 9–10, students participate in a familiar sequence of activities: Focused read-aloud of an excerpt from Weather (National Geographic Readers), Science Talk, and independent writing of a Planning for the Weather Fact page.
  • Today, students revisit responsibility, a habit of character focus. Their earlier discussions have focused on self-reflection, but today students reflect on the positive behaviors of their classmates to celebrate their efforts and growth with this habit of character.
  • Continue to use Goals 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In the Opening, students participate in the Interactive Word Wall protocol in a small group setting for the first time. With increased independence, some students may be challenged to both follow the protocol steps and engage in the cognitive work the task involves. If possible, consider involving another adult to host a group for students who need extra scaffolding.
  • Students may find the concept of planning a challenging idea to grasp, especially as it relates specifically to planning for the weather. To make this idea more concrete, consider providing additional, tangible examples of the weather’s impact on your daily life. (Example: “If it is raining, what should I do? What should I wear? When it was raining, I wore my boots and carried an umbrella.”) If time permits, tell students a story from your own life to demonstrate why planning for the weather is important. (Example: “One day I got groceries when it was raining. I tried to take them into the rain, and the paper bags broke!”)

Down the road:

  • In Lesson 12, students will complete the Weather Fact Page Assessment.
  • In Lesson 13, students share their learning about weather with a small group and some class visitors. If you have not yet confirmed visitors, consider reaching out to include older students, colleagues or other school community members. In Lesson 12, students will practice sharing several pages from their Meteorologist’s notebook with a peer to prepare for sharing. They will also practice sharing a class weather journal entry with a small group of students.

In Advance

  • Strategically place students into groups of four or five for work during the Opening.
  • Prepare:
    • Interactive Word Wall card sets and arrow card sets for groups of four to five students (see Lessons 9–10 supporting materials).
    • Mystery photos for use during Work Time A (see supporting materials).
  • Distribute materials for Work Time C at student workspaces. This ensures a smooth transition into Work Time C.
  • Review the Picture Tea Party and Interactive Word Wall protocols. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Science Talk Groups chart, class weather journal template, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • If students were recorded during the Interactive Word Wall, Picture Tea Party, Science Talk, or Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocols in previous lessons, consider playing these recordings to remind students of the process.
  • Create a slideshow of the Mystery Photos: Planning for the Weather images.
  • Create the Planning for the Weather Facts chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Students complete the Planning for the Weather Fact page using word-processing software, such as Google Docs.
  • Students use speech-to-text facilities activated on devices or use an app or software like Dragon Dictation.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.B.5, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, and K.I.C.12

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing opportunities to use all language modalities to comprehend and apply their learning. This will reinforce content knowledge and English language development.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend and use conditional language and modals necessary for talking about planning, such as would, could, and should. Make these concepts as clear as possible by pointing to visuals of weather conditions along with corresponding plans whenever possible. Provide additional practice using language that expresses conditions and cause and effect. See Meeting Students’ Needs column for details.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time B, encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to extend and deepen conversations, think with others, and enhance language development.
  • During Closing and Assessment A, consider providing students with personal white boards or their own copies of the class weather journal so they can complete their own writing along with the class. This will allow all students to practice, to remain engaged throughout the activity, and to provide real-time assessment data.
  • In preparation for the assessment, observe student progress during Work Time C before providing additional support. If students grapple with the task, remind them of any environmental resources that would support their work.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, distribute a partially filled-in copy of the Planning for the Weather Facts page from the Meteorologist’s notebook. This will provide students with models for the kind of information they should enter while reducing the volume of work required.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the focused read-aloud, students learn about planning for different types of weather. Emphasize critical features of appropriate clothing in relation to weather with examples and non-examples.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): When reading about and discussing what to wear for different kinds of weather, provide options for physical action by inviting students to pretend they are putting on sunglasses, putting on rain boots, and/or getting ready for snowy weather.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Before students move into Science Talk groups, create an accepting classroom environment by reminding the class that sometimes two students might have the same idea to share.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T);  Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • weather, temperature, rain, wind, sun, snow, droplet, light, heat, cloud (L)
  • plan (T)

Materials

  • Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 9)
  • Interactive Word Wall cards (from Lessons 9–10; one set per group)
  • Arrow cards (from Lesson 9; one set per group)
  • Mystery Photos: Planning for the Weather (one per student)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Planning for the Weather Facts chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Weather (National Geographic Readers) (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Science Talk Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8)
  • Weather talking sticks (from Lesson 8; one per Science Talk group)
  • Science Talk Groups chart (from Lesson 8; one to display)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 2)
  • Meteorologist’s notebook (one per student)
    • Planning for the Weather (page 6 of the Meteorologist’s notebook; one per student and one to display)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Class weather journal template (blank; from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Responsibility anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Word Wall: Building Vocabulary (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group gathering area.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lessons 9–10 and review as necessary using the Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Hold up each Interactive Word Wall card, reading the word aloud. Make sure all students can see the word and picture icon on each card.
  • Share that today students will work in small groups to complete the activity.
  • Move students into groups and distribute Interactive Word Wall cards and arrow cards.
  • Guide students through the Interactive Word Wall protocol. As groups work to connect all of their word cards, circulate and provide reminders about how to participate correctly.
  • Gather students whole group and give them specific, positive feedback regarding their participation in the protocol. (Example: “I noticed that Aziz waited for his turn and made a connection between two words.”)
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What step in this protocol did you do well?” (Responses will vary, but may include: I sat in the circle, I waited my turn, I connected two cards, I explained my connection.)

  • Invite several students to share out. If there is a particularly challenging step for all groups, consider re-modeling that portion of the protocol briefly.
  • Before students break up into small groups, foster a supportive classroom community by discussing what to do if there is a disagreement. (Example: “When you are in your small group, someone might make a connection you don’t agree with or that you don't understand. If this happens, try to be flexible and remember we are taking turns. This is a chance to learn about new connections between these words!” (MME)
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by inviting students to paraphrase the rationale for each connection in their own words. Restate or rephrase as necessary. (Example: “The sun gives heat. Cynthia, can you tell me, in your own words, why we connected sun and heat?”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 4: Weather, Pages 28–29 (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to use the Picture Tea Party protocol to view Mystery Photos: Planning for the Weather. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Distribute the mystery photos and invite students to begin the protocol.
  • Refocus whole group. Invite students back to the whole group area, and collect the mystery photos.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Based on the images you saw in the mystery photos, what do you think we will learn about today?” (Responses will vary, but may include: weather items, weather clothing.)

  • Direct students’ attention to the learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can ask and answer questions about planning for weather using the text Weather.”
  • Remind students that they have learned about the sun, clouds, and rainbows using this text, and today they will use the information in this text to ask and answer questions about planning for weather.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Planning for the Weather Facts chart. Tell students that as they hear information about planning for the weather read aloud, they will record important facts on this chart.
  • Display pages 28–29 of the text Weather and read the title on page 28 aloud.
  • Invite students to look closely at the illustration on page 28.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you see?” (a boy holding an umbrella, with a rain jacket and rain boots)

“Why do you think he is holding his umbrella and wearing his rain gear?” (He is holding his umbrella and wearing his rain gear because it is raining.)

  • Explain that this page is about the weather and how it affects people every day.
  • While still displaying the text, read the sentence on page 28 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Review the definition of plan (an action one intends to take; aim).
  • While still displaying the text, read the second sentence on page 28 aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“When would it be a good idea to wear sunglasses?” (when it is sunny outside)

“When would it be a good idea to wear rain boots?” (when it is raining or snowing)

“What might you wear when it is snowing?” (snow boots, winter coat, gloves, scarf, mittens)

  • Explain that every day people check the weather to plan what to wear.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“How can you check the weather?” (television report, weather app on phone, look outside or go outside)

  • Record this fact on the Planning for the Weather Facts chart. (Checking the weather helps you to plan what to wear.)
  • While still displaying the text, read the third sentence of page 28 aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What kind of weather would be a good day to swim?” (a hot, sunny day)

“What kind of weather would be a good day for throwing snowballs?” (snowy weather, a snowstorm)

  • Invite students to look at the photos on page 29 to help them answer the questions.
  • Review the idea that the weather helps you plan what to wear.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What else does checking the weather help us to plan?” (Checking the weather helps you plan what to do.)

  • Explain that every day people also check the weather to plan what to do and record this fact on the Planning for the Weather Facts chart.
  • Invite a few students to summarize the information on the Planning for the Weather Facts chart thus far. (Example: “We know that checking the weather helps us to plan what to wear and what to do every day.”)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What other facts could we record on our chart about planning for different types of weather?” (Responses will vary, but may include: ideas about specific things to wear and do in different kinds of weather.)

  • Record several other facts on the Planning for the Weather Facts chart.
  • Explain that in the Science Talk today, students will think about planning for specific kinds of weather.
  • When reading page 28, provide options for physical action by inviting students to pretend they are putting on sunglasses, putting on rain boots, and/or getting ready for snowy weather. (MMAE)
  • When discussing how to plan for different types of weather, emphasize critical features with examples and non-examples. (Example: “If it is sunny and warm outside, I might plan to wear my sunglasses. I would not plan to wear my winter hat.”) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: During Work Time A, consider completing or reviewing the Language Dive conversation introduced in Lesson 10.
  • For ELLs: Practice using the word when to express cause and effect. Invite students to use the sentence frame: “When it is _____, I _____.” (When it is snowing, I wear boots. When it is sunny, I play outside. When it is cloudy, I use an umbrella.)

B. Science Talk: How Do We Plan for the Weather? (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can talk about planning for different kinds of weather with my classmates.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bow and take aim at the target.
  • Tell students they will now participate in a Science Talk about planning for the weather in a small group. Remind them that they used this protocol in the previous lesson and review as necessary using the Science Talk Protocol anchor chart and reinforcing areas that were challenging for students.
  • Also remind students of how to use the weather talking stick to take turns speaking. Model using the talking stick and how to participate in the protocol, as necessary.
  • Post and review the question students will talk about in small groups today:

“How do we plan for different kinds of weather?”

  • Encourage students to think about one kind of weather when answering the question.
  • Model answering the question. Say: “You plan for rainy weather by wearing rain boots and planning to play inside.”
  • Move students into their Science Talk groups using the Science Talk Groups chart and invite groups to sit on the floor in a circle. Distribute weather talking sticks.
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Prompt all students to silently think about the question:

“How do we plan for different kinds of weather?”

  • Provide sentence stems:
    • “You plan for rainy weather by _____.”
    • “You plan for snowy weather by _____.”
    • “You plan for windy weather by _____.”
    • “You plan for warm, sunny weather by ______.”
  • Invite the students with the weather talking sticks to begin. As groups begin to share, circulate and remind students of the directions using the Science Talk anchor chart as needed. Re-model using the sentence starters if needed. Also, consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • After 5–7 minutes, signal all students to stop speaking through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Invite students to bring the weather talking sticks and return to the whole group area.
  • Briefly review the Science Talk anchor chart.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What is one thing you noticed a classmate in your Science Talk group doing well?” (Responses will vary, but may include: waited for his/her turn, listened when others were speaking, or talked about the question.)

  • Select a few volunteers to share out.
  • Prompt students to think about all of the facts they heard during the Science Talk and choose one fact about planning for different kinds of weather that they would like to draw and write about.
  • Before students move into Science Talk groups, create an accepting classroom environment by reminding the class that sometimes two students might have the same idea to share. Say: “With your group, you will try to come up with lots of different ideas about how to prepare for the weather. But sometimes someone else will share the same idea you were planning to share! If two people share the same idea about planning for the weather, that is okay. It just means you were both thinking about the same thing.” (MME)
  • For ELLs: As students complete the sentence stem “You plan for _____ by _____,” point out that the next word will always end in -ing. Prompt students to generate -ing words that might help them complete their thoughts. (Examples: wearing, using, packing)
  • For ELLs: Display the sentence stem “You plan for ____ by_____” and reread it several times. Invite students to practice using it as a class before beginning the Science Talk.

C. Independent Writing: Planning for the Weather Fact Page (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:
    • “I can use pictures and words to teach my reader a fact about planning for the weather.”
  • Prompt students to notice that they have learned many new facts about planning for the weather today. Refer to the Planning for the Weather chart and Weather (National Geographic Readers) text to reinforce as needed.
  • Remind students that in Lesson 10 they created fact pages to share facts about rainbows with their reader. Today, students will create another fact page about planning for different kinds of weather.
  • Display the Planning for the Weather Fact page.
    • Point to the picture box and tell students that a picture to show a fact about planning for the weather can be drawn here.
    • Point to the words box/line and tell students that words to tell a fact about planning for the weather can be written here.
  • Prompt students to consider that they are planning as writers, just as they are planning for how to dress for the weather, because planning is an important skill.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What picture will you draw to show your fact about planning for the weather?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group and select a few students to share out.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What words will you write to tell your fact about planning for the weather?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group and select a few students to share out.
  • Invite students to show a thumbs-up or touch their head if they are ready to begin drawing and writing their fact about planning for weather.
  • Invite students showing the ready signal to move safely to their designated workspace and begin working with their pencils and Meteorologist’s notebook.
  • Give students 10–15 minutes to write and draw. As they work, circulate and engage with them about their drawing and writing. Consider prompting students by saying and asking:

“Tell me what fact you are drawing/writing.”

“What fact are you drawing/writing?”

  • As needed, direct students to the Weather Word Wall and Planning for the Weather Facts chart to support their work.
  • After 10—15 minutes, signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle. Model cleanup procedures, keeping directions clear and brief. Invite students to notice how they can show responsibility through their cleanup today.
  • Direct students to clean up their workspace and then walk safely to the whole group gathering area.
  • For ELLs: Before students begin working independently, invite them to share some of the facts they discussed with their partners. Record and display some of the responses with quick sketches. Encourage students to think of their own facts and give them the option of using one of the recorded responses from the class if they are stuck.
  • For ELLs: Invite students to use one of the sentence frames from Work Times A and B to plan and write their facts. (Examples: “When it is _____, I _____.” or “I plan for rainy weather by _____.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to today’s class weather journal template.
  • Review the previous journal entries to gain a sense of pattern emerging.
  • Follow the Interactive Writing: Class Weather Journal instructional practice from Lessons 5 to complete Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 of the class weather journal template.
  • Direct students’ attention to Part 5 of the class weather journal template and read aloud the sentence: “We would be most comfortable wearing _______.”
  • Direct students’ attention to the six picture icons and read the accompanying word descriptors. Ask:

“Which picture(s) show what we would be most comfortable wearing today?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite a student volunteer to circle the picture icon(s) that the class chose.
  • Read aloud the completed sentence and track the print with a pointer as you read.
  • Direct students’ attention to Part 6 of the class weather journal template and read aloud the sentence: “Today would be a good day to ______.”
  • Explain that this sentence is a place where students can share what plan they might make in today’s weather.
  • Model filling in the sentence based on the day’s weather. (Example: “Today would be a good day to play outside.”)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What would today be a good day to do?” (Responses will vary but should be appropriate activities for the day’s weather.)

  • Choose one response and fill in the blank space with the given response.
  • Read aloud the completed sentence and track the print with a pointer as you read.
  • Direct students’ attention to the top of the weather journal template and invite a student to come to the front and read the completed weather journal aloud to the class, as a meteorologist would do.
  • Before asking a student volunteer to circle a picture icon of what the class would be most comfortable wearing, support planning by inviting all students to whisper to a partner how they might answer the question. Repeat this process as you invite students to consider what plans they might make in today’s weather. (MMAE)

B. Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face: Reflecting on Responsibility (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Responsibility anchor chart and read aloud.
  • Tell students they are now going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to explain how they noticed a classmate showing responsibility today. Remind students that they used this protocol in previous lessons and review as necessary, using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post the following sentence stem:
    • “I noticed ____ showing responsibility today by ________.”
  • Guide students through two rounds of the protocol using the following question:

“How did you notice a classmate showing responsibility today?”

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Ask students to return to their seats.
  • Invite a few students to share out. (Example: “I noticed Elizabeth showing responsibility today by picking up all the materials at her table when it was time to clean up at the end of the writing time.”
  • For ELLs: As students complete the sentence stem “I noticed ____ showing responsibility today by ________,” remind them that the next word will always end in -ing. Prompt students to generate -ing words that might help them complete their thoughts. (Examples: thinking, working, writing)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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