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ELA GK:M2:U1:L1

Speaking and Listening: Who Are Meteorologists?

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can participate in a discussion with my classmates about weather and meteorologists. (SL.K.1 and SL.K.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist during this lesson to document student progress toward SL.K.1 and SL.K.4 (see Assessment Resources and Overview).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reading Aloud: “Curious Sofia” (15 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Weather Photos (15 minutes)

B. Engaging the Scientist: Noticing and Wondering about Meteorologists (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Interactive Writing: Introducing the Class Weather Journal (15 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, students are introduced to the unit’s guiding questions: “What is weather?” and “How can I be prepared for any type of weather?” They also learn of the module topic (weather) through a narrative about a young girl named Sofia. In the story, Sofia invites students into the study of weather and asks the students to help her answer the unit guiding questions. Throughout the unit, help foster students’ curiosity and imagination by encouraging them to engage with this imaginary character and her adventures.
  • The literacy focus for this lesson is speaking and listening. Students revisit speaking and listening routines used throughout Module 1: the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol and Conversation Norms anchor chart. They also learn new instructional routines that will be returned to throughout the school year: the Picture Tea Party protocol and the interactive class weather journal.
  • In the Opening, students are introduced to the Weather Word Wall. In this first Word Wall lesson, the words weather and meteorologist are added to the wall. Word Walls feature words that hold weight across the module. They include both domain-specific words and academic words that will be used to build content knowledge and to apply during speaking and writing activities throughout the module. Refer to the Unit 1 Overview for a list of the Word Wall words for Unit 1.
  • In Work Time B, students watch a 2- to 3-minute segment of the video of a meteorologist embedded in the website http://wspa.com/category/weather.
    • Citation: “Weather.” Video. WSPAcom. Media General Communications Holdings, n.d. Web. 12 July 2016. http://wspa.com/category/weather. (For display. Used by permission.)
  • Purpose: to begin to develop an understanding of the work of meteorologists
    • As an alternative to the video provided, consider streaming a meteorologist report from a local news channel.
  • In almost all lessons, students hear complex texts read aloud. Primary learners need to hear a large number of texts read aloud to build their word and world knowledge. When possible, display the text when reading aloud. And when doing a first read-aloud of a given text, read fluently, with expression and without interruption. For additional information, refer to the Module Overview.
  • To allow for a volume of reading on the topic of weather for this module, see the Recommended Texts and Other Resources list. Ensure that students have a variety of informational and narrative texts below, on, and above grade level for this topic available during independent reading in the K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This is the first lesson of the module, so it sets the foundation for future lessons. However, as noted above, this lesson builds on a few routines established in Module 1.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • The Picture Tea Party is a new protocol for students. Students may need extra scaffolding or modeling to transition from Round 1 to Round 2 groups. Also, based on students’ prior experiences, they may need more structure to determine the order in which students share.

Down the road:

  • Students will continue to develop their response to the Unit 1 guiding questions (“What is weather?” and “How can I be prepared for any type of weather?”) as they engage in close read-aloud sessions of Weather Words and What They Mean and focused read-aloud sessions of National Geographic Kids: Weather, experience hands-on science activities, maintain a class weather journal, and hold classroom conversations related to these experiences.
  • In Unit 1, the weather journal is completed as a group activity; however, in subsequent units, students will maintain the journal independently as they continue to hone their skills and knowledge as meteorologists.
  • In Lesson 2, students ideally go outside to observe the weather. Refer to the Lesson 2 Teaching Notes and prepare accordingly.
  • In Lessons 1–8, students add content vocabulary words to the Weather Word Wall. This mirrors the Word Wall work in Module 1. However, in Lesson 9, the Word Wall becomes hands-on and students have an opportunity to collaborate as a class and in small groups through the Interactive Word Wall protocol. 

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • A large wall space for the Weather Word Wall. Words and visuals will be added to this Word Wall throughout the module. Make sure students can easily access the Word Wall, as they will need the words during conversations and writing.
    • Weather Word Wall cards for the words weather and meteorologist. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (see supporting materials).
    • Mystery weather photos for Work Time A.
    • Class weather journal template by writing Parts 1, 2, and 3 on a piece of chart paper and copying and attaching the weather journal icons below Part 2. Make sure each lesson’s journal entry is on a separate sheet of chart paper (see supporting materials).
  • Strategically place students in groups of three or four for the Picture Tea Party protocol in Work Time A.
  • Prepare technology necessary to play the meteorologist video in Work Time B.
  • Review the Picture Tea Party protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning target, “Learning Target” poem, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create the Word Wall in an online format such as Padlet to share vocabulary words with families.
  • Opening A: Prepare technology necessary to play “Weather.”
    • “Weather.” Video. WSPAcom. Media General Communications Holdings, n.d. Web. 12 July 2016. <http://wspa.com/category/weather/>. (For display. Used by permission.)
  • Consider that YouTube, social media video sites, and other website links may incorporate inappropriate content via comment banks and ads. Although some lessons include these links as the most efficient means to view content in preparation for the lesson, teachers should preview them and/or use a filter service, such as www.safeshare.tv, to view the links in the classroom.
  • Create a slideshow of the mystery weather photos.
  • Record students as they participate in the Picture Tea Party protocol to watch later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Create the Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, to display and share with families.
  • Record students as they complete the class weather journal to listen to later as models for the group. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Complete the class weather journal using a word-processing tool, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1 and K.I.B.5

Important points in the lesson itself:

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through structured opportunities to develop and use speaking and listening skills within an authentic context. Students will also benefit from the many visual supports provided in the lesson.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to process and comprehend the abundance of information provided during this lesson. With the lesson’s heavy emphasis on speaking and listening, students may take longer to process language they hear from videos, teachers, and peers, especially since the content may be unfamiliar. Throughout the lesson, stop frequently to check for comprehension. Rephrase and reteach protocols, vocabulary, and concepts as necessary. Empower students to silently signal when they feel confused. Remind them that it is all right if they do not understand everything, as there will be plenty of time to ask questions throughout the unit.

Levels of support:

For lighter support:

  • When modeling the Picture Tea Party protocol with students during Work Time A, invite intermediate students to volunteer to model for the class. This will boost confidence while providing practice using the protocol and sentence frames.
  • Encourage students to use Conversation Cues with classmates to promote comprehension and equity as they interact in groups and pairs. (Examples: “Did you mean …?” and “Can you repeat what Maria just said?”)

For heavier support:

  • During the Picture Tea Party protocol in Work Time A, consider assigning beginning proficiency students a buddy of a more advanced proficiency. The pair could remain together throughout the protocol and travel to different groups together.
  • During Work Time B, watch the meteorologist video twice. Students will be able to absorb and comprehend more information during their second viewing once they understand the general idea after the first viewing. Consider making the task more manageable by asking some students to focus on observing one thing the meteorologist does and some to focus on observing one thing the meteorologist says.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In Work Time A, you will introduce the Picture Tea Party protocol and invite student volunteers to help model. This protocol involves multiple processes as students physically orient their bodies with a group of peers while simultaneously planning for and engaging in partner discussion. You can help students be more successful by providing the entire class with the opportunity to practice grouping up with three or four students a few times before adding the element of discussion.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time B, students will watch and discuss a meteorologist video. In addition to discussing the video, you can provide options for expression and communication by inviting students to act out one thing they noticed the meteorologist doing.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): The story “Curious Sofia” is read during the Opening. As you read each page, optimize relevance by asking students to share connections to the text based on their own lives.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • weather, meteorologist, journal, observe, prediction, interact (L)

Review:

  • discussion (L)

Materials

  • “Curious Sofia” (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Unit 1 guiding questions (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Weather Word Wall (new; begun in Work Time A; see Teaching Notes)
  • Weather Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Module 1; one to display)
  • Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Conversation Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Sample mystery weather photo (three to display)
  • Mystery weather photos (one per student)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Meteorologist video (video; see Technology and Multimedia)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time B)
  • Class weather journal template (new; one to display; completed during Closing Part A; see Teaching Notes)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: “Curious Sofia” (15 minutes)

  • Gather whole group.
  • Tell them that today is a very exciting day because they get to listen to a brand-new story.
  • Display page 1 of “Curious Sofia.”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you see in this picture?” (a little girl looking at the sky)

  • Say:

“As I read this story, I want you to think hard about all of the things Sofia wanted to do and how she made sure she was able to do them. Please quietly push the imaginary button on your brain to show you are ready to think hard.” Model this gesture if necessary.

  • While still displaying the text, read aloud page 1 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is one thing we know about Sofia?” (She is in kindergarten, she loves to learn, she asks lots of questions, and she likes to be prepared.)

  • Turn to page 2. Ask:

“What do you see in this picture?” (Sofia and a fish)

  • Read aloud page 2. Ask:

“What did Sofia do to learn about and be prepared for her goldfish?” (She listened to books that her older brother read, she talked to people at the pet store, and she looked at pictures.)

  • Read aloud page 3. Ask:

“What did Sofia want to do when she was 5 years old?” (take care of her baby sister)

“What did Sofia do to learn about and be prepared to care for her baby sister?” (She listened to books that her older brother read to her, she looked at pictures, and she talked to parents in the neighborhood to learn more about babies.)

  • Read aloud page 4. Ask:

“What does Sofia want to do now that she is 6?” (pick out her own clothes to wear)

“What does her mom tell her she needs to do in order to pick out her own clothes?” (learn about the weather)

  • Read aloud page 5. Ask:

“What questions does Sofia ask about the weather?” (What is weather? How can I be prepared for any type of weather?)

  • Tell students that they get to help Sofia answer these important questions. Display the Unit 1 guiding questions and read them aloud:

“What is weather?”

“How can I be prepared for any type of weather?”

  • Explain that during the next couple of weeks, students will work hard to try to help Sofia answer these questions. Tell them that they will read interesting books, go outside and observe the weather, keep a weather journal, and do some science experiments so they can become weather experts.
  • Reread the last paragraph and tell students that it’s time to begin learning about the weather!
  • For ELLs: Before you read “Curious Sofia,” help children link the phrase be prepared to the meaning by explicitly defining it. Example: “In this story, author uses the phrase be prepared. Can anyone tell us what be prepared means?” (be ready, get organized) (MMR)
  • As you read each page of “Curious Sofia” and stop to ask questions, optimize relevance by asking students to share connections to the text based on their own lives. (Example: After reading page 3, say, “Give a thumbs-up if you or someone you know has a younger sibling. Turn to your elbow partner and share one thing you have seen someone do to take care of a baby.” (MME)
  • For ELLs: Be aware that it may seem strange and unfamiliar to some students that Sofia, a child their age, is able to take so much responsibility within her household. If necessary, point out that this is the case in Sofia’s family even if it is not the case in all families. Create space for students to process and to compare and contrast their experiences.
  • For ELLs: To support comprehension, invite students to act out some of Sofia’s activities. (Example: Invite a student to stand up and to pretend she is feeding a fish or holding a baby.)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Picture Tea Party: Mystery Weather Photos (15 minutes)

  • Introduce the Weather Word Wall by saying:

“Remember how we had a special place in the room to collect our toys and play words? We will have a special spot for our weather words, too. Let’s add our first important word: weather!”

  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for weather.
    •  Ask students to repeat the word aloud.
    •  Provide the definition: “Weather is the conditions outside. Weather concerns such things as temperature, rain, snow, sun, and other factors.”
    •  Invite students to clap out the word. (wea-ther)
    •  Ask:

“What is the translation of weather in our home languages?” (el clima in Spanish) Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation in a home language other than their own to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.

    •  Provide an example of the word in a sentence: “I love sunny weather because I can play outside.”
    •  Place the Word Wall card and picture for weather on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Say: “Just like Sofia looked at pictures, listened to books, and talked to people, we are going to do all sorts of activities to learn about the weather. Let’s start by looking at some pictures.”
  • Tell students that they are now going to look at some pictures that are in some way connected to the weather. They will then have a discussion with their classmates about the pictures.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:

 “I can participate in a discussion with my classmates about weather and meteorologists.”

  • Remind students that a discussion is when two or more people talk about something together.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Tell students they will now use the Picture Tea Party protocol to have a conversation about some interesting photos.
  • Move students into predetermined groups of three or four and invite them to label themselves A, B, C, etc.
  • Referring to the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart, explain the steps:
    •  Point to the image of the person looking at the picture. Tell students that you will give them a picture. When they get their picture, they should look at it closely. Have students put on their imaginary glasses to indicate looking closely.
    •  Point to the image of the people facing each other with speech bubbles. Tell students that once everyone has looked closely at his or her picture, you will signal them to share with their small group using the sentence frame “In my picture, I see_______.” Group member A should share first.
    •  Point to the image of the people raising their hands. Once every group member has shared, they should raise their hands to show they have finished talking and listening.
    •  Point to the image of the people walking. Tell students that once all groups have their hands in the air, you will signal them to calmly and quietly walk around the room to form a new group of three or four students. Once in their new groups, they should re-label themselves A, B, C, etc.
    •  Point to the image of people sitting. Tell students that once they have formed a new group, they should sit with their group.
    •  Point to the image of the people facing each other with speech bubbles. Tell students that this time, they will share a prediction about what they might learn or a question about their picture, using a sentence frame. Group member A should share first. Review the definition of prediction as necessary (a statement about something that might happen or is expected to happen). Post the following sentence frames:
  • “I see _____, so I predict we might learn about ______.”
  • I see _____, so I wonder _____.”
    •  Point to the image of the people raising their hands. Once every group member has shared, they should again raise their hands to show they have finished talking and listening.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Conversation Norms anchor chart and quickly review their jobs as speakers and listeners.
  • Model briefly what this should look like with student volunteers (or other adults) using the sample mystery weather photos.
  • Tell students that now it is their turn to practice looking closely at pictures and sharing their ideas with a small group.
  • Distribute the mystery weather photos and guide students through the Picture Tea Party protocol using the Picture Tea Party Protocol anchor chart.
  • Circulate to support students and use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to gather data on students’ progress toward the speaking and listening standards named for the lesson.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their work during the Picture Tea Party protocol. (Example: “I noticed Sarah looking closely at her picture for details to share with her group.”)
  • After student volunteers model the Picture Tea Party protocol for the class, let the entire class practice grouping up with three or four students a few times before asking them to discuss the weather photos with their group. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As a group models completing the Picture Tea Party protocol, cold call students to repeat or add to what the volunteers have said, using the sentence frames. This will provide an opportunity to check for comprehension while giving some students practice using the sentence frames before the protocol begins.
  • For ELLs: It may take longer for some students to process language and follow the conversation during the Picture Tea Party protocol. Encourage students to speak up when they would like to hear something repeated. Empower them with questions they can ask to regulate the pace of the conversation. (Examples: “Can you please repeat what you said?” and “Can you please speak more slowly?”)

B. Engaging the Scientist: Noticing and Wondering about Meteorologists (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that they now will begin to learn about meteorologists.
  • Show students the Weather Word Wall card for meteorologist.
    •  Ask students to repeat the word aloud.
    •  Provide the definition: “A meteorologist is a scientist who studies the earth’s weather.”
    •  Invite students to clap out the word. (me-te-or-o-lo-gist)
    •  Provide an example of the word in a sentence: “The meteorologist predicts that the weather will be sunny tomorrow.”
    •  Put the Word Wall card and picture for meteorologist on the Weather Word Wall.
  • Tell students that in the coming weeks, they are going to be meteorologists by learning all about the weather!
  • Tell them that they will now watch a short video of a meteorologist. As they watch, they should look and listen carefully to see what the meteorologist is doing and hear what the meteorologist is saying.
  • Play the Meteorologist video. 
  • Stop midway through and invite students to share one thing they notice with an elbow partner
  • Continue playing the video until the end. Then tell students they will now share their thinking with a partner using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Module 1 and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Tell students they will participate in three rounds of the protocol, each time with a new partner, using the question and sentence stems below:
    •  “What is one thing you noticed the meteorologist doing or saying?”
    •  Provide the sentence frame: “I noticed the meteorologist _________.”
    •  Continue to use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to assess students’ progress toward the learning target.
  • Invite students to return to their seats.
  • Direct their attention to the Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart. Tell students they will use this chart to track their learning during the next three weeks. Today, they will begin to track some of their learning about meteorologists.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice the meteorologist doing or saying?” (uses weather words, talk about the weather, points at maps, shows pictures of weather, uses a computer/TV)

  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully:

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students share out, capture their responses on the Things Meteorologists Do anchor chart.
  • Invite students to think about one question they have about meteorologists. Ask them to put a hand on their head if they have a question.
  • Call on a handful of students to share their questions aloud.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their discussions about the video. (Example: “I noticed you watched the video carefully so you could notice what the meteorologist was doing and saying.”)
  • Tell students they will have a chance to practice being meteorologists right now!
  • After students watch the meteorologist video, provide options for expression by inviting students to act out one thing they noticed the meteorologist doing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Watch the meteorologist video twice. Students will be able to absorb and comprehend more information during their second viewing after they understand the general idea during the first viewing. Consider making the task more manageable by asking some students to focus on observing one thing the meteorologist does and some to focus on observing one thing the meteorologist says
  • For ELLs: Before initiating the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, brainstorm with the whole class two or three things that the meteorologist did or said in the video. Record and display student responses. Practice using the sentence frame with the responses. If students have trouble thinking of things to say during their partner discussions, invite them to use one of the examples generated by the class.
  • For ELLs: If students have trouble communicating their ideas about meteorologists, invite them to mime their thoughts about something they saw. Teach them the word for the actions they signal and invite them to repeat it. (Example: “It looks like you’re pointing to the forecast. Can you say ‘I noticed the meteorologist pointing to the forecast’?”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Interactive Writing: Introducing the Class Weather Journal (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that one thing they learned about meteorologists is that they tell people about the weather.
  • Inform students that because they are working hard to become experts on the weather, they are going to learn about and practice some of the things that meteorologists do, such as tell what the weather is like outside and how it feels.
  • Tell students that over the next two lessons, they are going to learn a new routine. As a class, they will observe the weather. Briefly explain that observe means to watch with care. 
  • After they observe the weather, they will write about it in a class weather journal. Tell students a journal is a written record of a person’s experiences, thoughts, or daily events.
  • Tell them that when they keep the weather journal, they will practice being meteorologists and also practice writing.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you think a meteorologist might tell people about the weather?” (Answers will vary, but may include: how hot/cold it is; whether it’s sunny, cloudy, rainy; or what to wear).

  • Direct students’ attention to the class weather journal template and read aloud Parts 1, 2, and 3 of the template.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice about this?” (Responses will vary, but may include: pictures of weather, blank spaces, words and sentences.)

  • Point out that there are some blank spaces and that, as a class, they will work and interact together to complete the sentences so that they can have a daily weather report.
  • Explain that when they interact with each other, they talk to each other, learn together, and take turns.
  • Direct students’ attention to Part 1 of the class weather journal template, read it aloud, and model filling it in. (Example: Today’s date is November 5, 2017)
  • Read aloud the next sentence in Part 2 on the weather journal template:
    •  “Today the weather is ______________.”
  • Direct students’ attention to the six picture icons and read the accompanying word descriptors.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Which picture best describes today’s weather?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite a volunteer to circle the picture icon that the class chose.
  • Read aloud the completed sentence, tracking the print with a pointer as you read.
  • Tell students that in the next lesson, they will practice writing a word together to complete Part 3 of the class weather journal template.
  • As you verbally introduce the words observe, journal, and interact, offer alternatives to auditory information by also acting out these words or displaying corresponding images. (MMR)
  • As you point out the weather picture icons, clarify these symbols by asking students to describe any differences between the images. (Examples: “Look closely. How do the pictures help us know that this one is snowy and this one is rainy? How are the pictures different from each other?”) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Think aloud the process of choosing the icon that best describes today’s weather to model the cognitive process and to clarify the question. (Example: “Hmm, I like this picture of the rain. Let me look outside and see if this is right. Is it raining outside? Which picture looks more like the sky outside?”) 

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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