Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 5 and Drawing and Writing | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M1:U3:L5

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 5 and Drawing and Writing

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts)
  • W.K.2: Use a combination of drawing, dictating, and writing to compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic.
  • SL.K.3: Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • SL.K.4: Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1d: Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
  • L.K.1f: Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe the toys that Gertie and Molly Lou prefer using details in the text. (RL.K.1, RL.K.7)
  • I can draw a new toy using pictures and words. (W.K.2)
  • I can ask questions to learn about my classmates. (SL.K.3, SL.K.4, L.K.1d, L.K.1f)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, listen for students to describe the toys Molly Lou and Gertie prefer using details in the text (RL.K.1, RL.K.7).
  • During Work Time B, listen as students share their toy idea with a partner to notice whether they are able to think of an idea and then share it. As students draw and write about a new toy, circulate and notice whether they are able to record their idea using pictures and words (W.K.2, SL.K.4).
  • During the Closing, listen as students ask a partner a question about their drawing of a toy. Notice whether students use question words to form a question, and whether the question makes sense. Redirect students to the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as needed (SL.K.3, SL.K.4, L.K.1, L.K.1d, L.K.1f).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Poem and Movement: “Jack-in-the-Box” Poem (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 5: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 21–24 (20 minutes)

B. Drawing and Writing: Imagining a New Toy (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Sharing and Learning: Toy Drawings (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students continue their close read of the unit’s anchor text: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon. In Session 5, students work to ask and answer questions about key details in a text as well as describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (RL.K.1, RL.K.7).
  • Throughout the module, students engage in hands-on explorations of classroom toys. They draw and write about what they know well. The activity in this lesson, to draw and write to imagine a new toy, serves multiple purposes: to give students authentic motivation to draw and write about a topic they love, to support their developing skills as drawers and writers, and to continue to hone their speaking and listening skills as they share their work with their peers (W.K.2, SL.K.3, SL.K. 4).
  • Students have been building several skills throughout the work of this module, including using descriptive language and asking and answering questions to learn information. In this lesson, students have the opportunity to combine these skills as they ask and answer questions to describe their drawing of a toy (SL.K.3, SL.K.4, L.K.1d).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students have had ample experiences describing the physical attributes of classroom toys. They have also explored different types of toys from now and long ago and considered their preferences among those toys. Many students will use this background knowledge to inform their ideas when imagining a new toy in today’s lesson.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may find the process of imagining a new toy challenging and may need support to make the choices needed to create something new. Consider providing additional modeling and support for these students or help them by limiting their choices. (Example: “I know you really like vehicles. You could create a new car. What color would your new car be?”)
  • Students may also be challenged to consider the recycled materials available to them that will be used to create their toy in Lesson 6. Place the recycled materials within easy viewing and access for students as they draw and write about their toy during Work Time B. As needed, prompt students to consider what specific material could help them to create their toy in Lesson 6. (Example: “I wonder what material you could use to make ___. Could you use ____?”)

Down the road:

  • In Session 7 of the close read-aloud, students will participate in a culminating task in which they draw and write to show how Gertie’s toy preferences have changed (W.K.2).

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the “Jack-in-the-Box” poem and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 5; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Prepare recycled materials for use to draw and then create a toy in this lesson and Lesson 6. Students will see the materials for the first time in this lesson to familiarize themselves with upcoming activities and expectations. A list of recommended items includes:
    • cotton balls
    • cotton swabs
    • cardboard containers/pieces
    • paper towel/toilet paper rolls
    • plastic bottle caps
    • plastic containers/bottles
    • buttons
    • yarn/string
  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student tables (blank paper, pencils, crayons).
  • During Work Time B, students will view a sample of recycled materials to draw and write a picture of a toy. Create a sample that represents the materials that will be available to them in Lesson 6. Lay the sample out on a mat, table, or other area that can be easily viewed and accessed.
  • Post: Photo of a jack-in-the-box, learning targets, “Learning Target” poem, Toys and Play Word Wall, Color Words anchor chart, Size Words anchor chart, Shape Words anchor chart, Texture Words anchor chart, and Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Video record the whole group reading the Jack-in-the-Box poem with actions and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students, as they discuss in pairs, to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.5, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.10, K.I.C.11, K.II.B.5, and K.II.C.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the opportunity to use verbal language in a structured way, to examine language closely, and to apply learning through creative expression.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to imagine and create drawings of original toys. Consider modeling a few suggestions that students can opt to emulate if they have trouble thinking of their own ideas.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Closing and Assessment A, invite intermediate and advanced proficiency students to create sentence frames that students can use as they ask questions about one another’s toys.

For heavier support:

  • During Closing and Assessment A, invite beginning proficiency students and those who need heavier support to use the sentence frames that more advanced proficiency students have created.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): This lesson includes several references to previously learned vocabulary. Activate students’ prior knowledge by using verbal and visual cues from these previous sessions. Additionally, some students may need a more interactive image of a jack-in-the-box. Consider showing a video of a jack-in-the-box rather than a picture.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): The outcome of this lesson is to draw an imagined toy that can be made with recycled materials. Consider offering a checklist for students to follow as they design their toy to help them follow the same process you model in the think-aloud. Additionally, some students may need flexibility in the process of designing a toy. For instance, you may consider allowing some students to collaborate on their design in pairs or small groups.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): There are several whole class activities in this lesson, such as the “Jack-in-the-Box” poem with movements and the share-out during the Closing. Be aware that some students may be uncomfortable with public performance. Consider offering alternative means of participation, so that all students can participate in a way that makes them comfortable. For instance, instead of doing the movements in the “Jack-in-the-Box” poem, a student can point to the words for the rest of the class to follow.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • imagine, draw, recycled materials (L)

Review:

  • image, imagination (L)

Materials

  • Photo of a jack-in-the-box (one to display)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • “Jack-in-the-Box” poem (one to display)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (from Lesson 1; Session 5; for teacher reference)
    • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (begun in Unit 1)
  • Sample of recycled materials (various; for teacher modeling; see Teaching Notes)
  • Chart paper (one piece; for use in Work Time B)
  • Color Words anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 2)
  • Conversation Partner chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1, one to display)
  • Blank paper (one piece per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Crayons (class set)
  • Size Words anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 2)
  • Shape Words anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 3)
  • Texture Words anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 3)
  • Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Poem and Movement: “Jack-in-the-Box” Poem (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Explain that today students will learn a new poem about a toy from long ago. This poem is special because there are movements to show how to play with this toy.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Have you seen a jack-in-the -box toy?”

  • Refer to the posted photo of a jack-in-the-box to make sure that students are familiar with this toy.
  • Using a document camera, display the “Jack-in-the-Box” poem and read it aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Read the poem a second time, inviting students to join in.
  • Explain that you will now read the poem again and show movements to go along with the words in the poem.
  • Read the poem a third time, showing the movements as you read.
  • Invite students to stand up safely. Provide reminders about personal space as needed.
  • Read and act out the movements of the poem again, inviting students to join in.
  • Instruct students to sit down carefully in their seats.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Do you think it would be fun to play with a jack-in-the-box?” (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs: Provide context by bringing in a jack-in-the-box to demonstrate how it works or by showing a short video of a jack-in-the-box in action. (MMR)
  • As students join in performing the movements, consider displaying graphical representation for the movements, which can serve as visual references and memory activation. (MMR, MME)
  • Some students may feel uncomfortable with the public performance of the movements. Consider giving them an alternative task, such as pointing to the words of the poem for the other students to follow along. (MME)
  • For ELLs: After asking whether it would be fun to play with a jack-in-the-box, prompt students to practice using because to say why. Use a sentence frame. (Example: “It would be fun to play with a jack-in-the-box because _____.”)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 5: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 21–24 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe the toys that Gertie and Molly Lou prefer by using details in the text.”

  • Explain that today students will continue to describe the toys that Gertie and Molly Lou prefer.
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 5; for teacher reference)
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer anchor chart.
  • For ELLs: Some students may need reminders about the meaning of the words prefer and details to activate their prior knowledge from previous sessions. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: While displaying the picture of clouds, ensure students understand that there are no right or wrong answers. Remind students that they are using their imaginations to see different things. Model identifying an imaginary object in the clouds.

B. Drawing and Writing: Imagining a New Toy (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

  "I can draw a new toy using pictures and words.”

  • Refer to the Toys and Play Word Wall, pointing to the word imagination.
  • Briefly review the definition of imagination (the power of the mind to make a thought or picture of something that is not real). Share that we use our imagination to imagine (to form a picture in the mind of something).
  • Explain that in a few minutes, students will imagine a new toy. They will think about a toy image, or picture, in their minds and then use pictures and words to draw the toy image.
  • Invite students to use their imaginary bows to take aim at the learning target.
  • Show students a sample of recycled materials, holding up the materials for easy viewing. Give reminders to look without touching as needed.
  • Explain that today students will use pictures and words to draw their toy on paper. In the next lesson, they will have the opportunity to create their toy using these materials!
  • Define recycled materials as materials that people use once, and then use again. Remind students that these are the materials Molly Lou Melon used to make her toy car.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Do you remember what kinds of materials Molly Lou Melon used?” (cardboard, paint)

  • Model thinking aloud as you draw a new toy on a blank piece of chart paper:

1. Draw a basic picture of the toy. Say:

“I really like cars, so I am imagining a new car that has six wheels. I can draw the image I see in my mind. First, I will draw a rectangle to show the body of the car. Now, I will draw circles to show the six wheels.”

2. Add a few words to the picture. Say:

“Now, I will add words to tell more about my toy. I want my car to be blue, so I will add the words blue and car. I see those words on our classroom walls.”

   Refer to the Color Words anchor chart (from Unit 2) to locate and write the word blue, and the Toys and Play Word Wall (from Unit 1) to locate and write the word car.

3. Add a detail. Say:

“I also want to write that my car will have six wheels. It is tricky to write the numeral six, but I am trying my best.”

  • Prompt students to think quietly to themselves:

“What kinds of toys do you prefer to play with? Which recycled materials could be used to make that kind of toy?”

  • Referring to the Conversation Partner chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing each other. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

“What kinds of toys do you prefer to play with? Which recycled materials could be used to make that kind of toy?”

  • Provide sentence starters as necessary. (Example: “The toy I like to play with is ______. I could make that toy using ___________.”)
  • As students share, circulate and listen in. Notice whether students are able to tell their partner what toy they would like to draw.
  • Refocus whole group and explain that now students will draw the toy they told their partner about.
  • Invite students to move safely to predetermined work areas, where they will find blank paper, pencils, and crayons, and begin their drawing of a toy using a picture and words.
  • As students work, circulate and engage with them about their drawings, prompting them with questions such as:

“Can you tell me about your toy idea?”

“How can you describe your toy?”

“What words or labels could you add to your drawing?”

  • Support students by referring them to resources around the room, such as the Toys and Play Word Wall, Color Words anchor chart (from Unit 2), Size Words anchor chart (from Unit 2), Shape Words anchor chart (from Unit 2), and Texture Words anchor chart (from Unit 2) to scaffold their writing.
  • After 8–10 minutes, signal all students to stop through the use of a designated sound, such as a chime or whistle.
  • Instruct students to bring their drawings and walk safely to the whole group gathering area.      
  • As you review the word imagination, invite students to locate where they see the word or the same letters in image within the larger word. Then, underline or draw a box around the letters “image” on the word card when drawing a connection to the word image to make the similarities between the two words explicit. (MMR)
  • As you model the think-aloud, help to support planning and strategy development by making it explicit that students should think about the available recycled materials in order to imagine their toy. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Provide differentiated mentors by purposefully preselecting student partnerships in which students who struggle can have peer support. Pair ELLs with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. (MME)
  • Some students may benefit from a checklist for creating their drawing. This checklist could include items such as, “This toy is fun to play with” and “I can make this toy from the recycled materials.” (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: For students who may need additional support developing a toy individually, consider offering differentiated processes such as collaborating with partners or in small groups to develop a toy. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Allow students to discuss the task in their home languages. (Example: “This task may be very difficult. To make it easier, you can take two minutes to talk about this with a partner who shares your home language. Then we can share in English.”)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Sharing and Learning: Toy Drawings (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in the whole group gathering area and place their drawing in their lap.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the third one aloud:

“I can ask questions to learn about my classmates.”

  • Briefly review the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart for reinforcement.
  • Explain that students will now have the opportunity to ask a partner questions about his or her drawing of a toy. Today they will choose a question to ask based on something they wonder about their partner’s drawing.
  • Model briefly what this should look like with a student volunteer.

1. Assign yourself as partner A and the volunteer as partner B.

2. Look at the student volunteer’s drawing of a toy.

3. Model asking a question to learn more about the toy in the drawing. Example:

“Your toy looks like a truck. How big is the truck?”

4. Listen as the student volunteer shares his or her answer.

5. Invite the student volunteer to ask you a question about your drawing of a toy (using the drawing you created as a model at the beginning of Work Time B).

6. Model a response.

  • Tell students that now it is their turn to ask their partner a question about his or her drawing of a toy.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partner chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing each other. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partners, asking questions based on their drawings.
  • As students discuss, listen in on their conversations. Notice whether students are able to ask a question and listen to their partner’s response. Also, notice whether students are able to describe their own drawing of a toy. Remodel as needed and refer students to the Color Words, Size Words, Shape Words, and Texture Words anchor charts for support in using descriptive language.
  • If productive, cue students to clarify the conversation by confirming what they mean:

“So, do you mean _____?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus the group and give students specific, positive feedback on asking questions to learn more about their classmates’ drawings of toys. (Example: “Leena, I heard you ask Carlos what color his truck will be. Nice job asking a question to learn more about his toy.”)
  • Collect students’ drawings of toys.
  • Preview the next lesson’s work by reminding students that they will have the opportunity to create their toy using recycled materials.
  • For ELLs: Provide options for expression by offering sentence starters for questioning. Examples:
    • “What can you tell me about _____?”
    • “Why did you decide to _____?” (MME)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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