Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 4 and Play and Exploration | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA GK:M1:U3:L4

Reading, Speaking, and Listening: Close Read-aloud Session 4 and Play and Exploration

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.K.1: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.K.4: Ask and answer questions about unknown words in a text.
  • RL.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (e.g., what moment in a story an illustration depicts)
  • SL.K.3: Ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1d: Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).
  • L.K.1f: Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.
  • L.K.5: With guidance and support from adults, explore word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.K.5b: Demonstrate understanding of frequently occurring verbs and adjectives by relating them to their opposites (antonyms).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can describe the toys that Gertie and Molly Lou prefer by using details in the text. (RL.K.1, RL.K.4, RL.K.7)
  • I can ask questions to learn about my classmates. (SL.K.3, L.K.1d, L.K.1f, L.K.5b)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, listen for students to describe the toys Molly Lou and Gertie prefer using details in the text (RL.K.1, RL.K.4, RL.K.7).
  • During Work Time B, monitor students’ participation in the Drop the Handkerchief game to ensure that students move safely around the circle. To support positive play, refer to the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart as needed.
  • During the Closing, monitor students as they ask a question and listen to their partner’s response. Also, listen for students to share their partner’s idea with the whole group. Direct students to the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart as needed (SL.K.3, L.K.1, L.K.1d, L.K.1f).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement: “Toys from Long Ago” Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 4: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 15–20 (20 minutes)

B. Play and Exploration: Drop the Handkerchief Game (20 minutes)

C. Reading Aloud: Playing with Friends (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In Work Time A, students continue their close read of the unit’s anchor text: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon. In Session 4, students work to ask and answer questions about key details and unknown words in a text and to describe the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear (RL.K.1, RL.K.4, RL.K.7).
  • As in Lessons 1–3, students continue to explore others’ perspectives by learning about both children long ago and their own classmates (D2.Civ.10.K-2).
  • Students continue to build speaking and listening skills by asking and answering others’ questions. This work supports their use of question words as well as their ability to perform the strategies listed on the Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart. (SL.K.3, L.K.1d)
  • Lessons 1–3 featured built-out instruction for Goal 2 Conversation Cues. Moving forward, this will appear only as reminders after select questions. Continue using Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation. Refer to the Lesson 1 Teaching Notes and see the Tools page for additional information on Conversation Cues.
  • Similar to Lessons 2–3, students participate in a game from long ago during Work Time B: Drop the Handkerchief game. Games such as this one present students with a playful learning experience and also build their self-regulation skills as they navigate following the rules and participating appropriately in the game.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 2–3, students heard the informational text Playing with Friends read aloud. Today they hear this text read aloud again, with a focus on the differences between toys now and long ago.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • For some students, identifying the concept of a difference will be challenging. Consider pointing out a specific physical attribute of two objects to help students see a difference. For example, compare the colors of two crayons: “The color of this crayon is purple, and the color of this crayon is orange. They are different colors.”

Down the road:

  • In Lessons 5–6, students will draw and then create a toy using recycled materials. If you have not gathered these materials, do so before Lesson 5. Also consider providing a time for students to explore the recycled materials before using them to create a toy in Lesson 6 (see Teaching Notes in Lesson 1 for more information).

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the “Toys from Long Ago” song and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 4; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Choose a handkerchief or other cloth to use in the Drop the Handkerchief game during Work Time B. Games similar to Drop the Handkerchief have been played for centuries by children in many countries. If possible, research a version of this game that best represents your students’ backgrounds.
  • Post: Learning targets, “Learning Target” poem, Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart, and Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students singing verses 1 and 2 of the “Toys from Long Ago” song in Lessons 2 and 3, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Record students, as they discuss in pairs, to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.B.5, K.I.B.6, K.I.C.12, and K.II.B.5

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the opportunity to use verbal language in a structured way, to examine language closely, and to apply learning through movement.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to remember the prompts and to sustain the peer-to-peer interaction during Closing and Assessment A. Fishbowl the interaction with two students after modeling it with a volunteer. Additionally, it may help to provide some students with prompts such as notecards with words or illustrations to guide each step of the interaction.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Prime students for the reflection in Closing and Assessment A by telling them at the beginning of the lesson that they will be asked to think about which toys they would most like to play with. Remind them throughout the lesson to think of their favorite toys so that they are prepared to reflect.

For heavier support:

  • During the close read-aloud, support and engage beginning proficiency students by inviting them to act out parts of the story. Dictate lines for them to recite, so that they practice using verbal language.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): For students to actively participate in this lesson, they will need to access visual prompts such as new vocabulary or the directions for the Drop the Handkerchief game. Consider using multiple formats such as verbal, textual, and graphic representations to help students access the material. Specifically, when discussing the differences between toys from now and long ago in Work Time Part C, consider using a Venn diagram to build on the discussion of similarities from the previous session. This visual juxtaposition will help to highlight key features of similarity and difference.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students are asked to share their learning through written and verbal expression. Offer varied methods for students to demonstrate their understanding. For instance, during the close reading activity, provide alternatives to pencil and paper recording forms. Additionally, during the closing activity, allow students to communicate their preferences through alternatives such as writing, drawing, or physically pointing.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): The Drop the Handkerchief game in this lesson is an exciting opportunity for students to physically participate in their learning. However, some students may feel overstimulated and engage in behavior that could be unsafe for themselves and their fellow students. In addition to stating the directions before you begin the game, be upfront and explicit about behavioral expectations, so that all students can engage in the classroom activity safely.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • handmade (T)
  • different (L)

Review:

  • similar, prefer (L)

Materials

  • Document camera (optional)
  • “Toys from Long Ago” song (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • “Learning Target” poem (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (from Lesson 1; Session 4; for teacher reference)
    • Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
  • Handkerchief (or other cloth; for the Drop the Handkerchief game)
  • Drop the Handkerchief game directions (for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
  • Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 6)
  • Playing with Friends (from Lesson 2; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Conversation Partner chart (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: “Toys from Long Ago” Song (5 minutes)

  • Using a document camera, display the “Toys from Long Ago” song and invite students to sing verses 1 and 2 with you.
  • Read or sing the last line again: “Similar and different to the ones I know.”
  • Remind students that similar means almost the same, or alike, and that different means not the same.
  • Ask:

“What is the translation of different in our home languages?” (diferente in Spanish) Call on student volunteers to share. Ask other students to choose one translation to quietly repeat. Invite students to say their chosen translation out loud when you give the signal. Chorally repeat the translations and the word in English. Invite self- and peer correction of the pronunciation of the translations and the English.

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“Which toys are different from the toys children play with now?” (top, jacks, horse, hoop and stick, newspaper boat)

  • Explain that today students will consider how toys now and long ago are different.
  • Offer alternatives to auditory information by providing visual notations of music or sound and use facial expressions or hand gestures to convey the emotional interpretation of the song. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: When introducing the definition for different and reviewing the definition of same, provide options for language by clarifying new vocabulary with graphic symbols (e.g., a picture of two toys that are the same or similar and two that are different). (MMR)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 4: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon, Pages 15–20 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can describe the toys that Gertie and Molly Lou prefer by using details in the text.”

  • Briefly review the definition of prefer (to choose above others, as the best liked or most wanted).
  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target while you recite the “Learning Target” poem aloud.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Have Fun, Molly Lou Melon (Session 4; for teacher reference)
  • Refer to the guide for the use of the Toys Molly Lou and Gertie Prefer anchor chart.
  • Clarify the meaning of the word prefer by connecting it to prior vocabulary knowledge such as favorite or best of all. (MMR)
  • For students who may need additional support recording with pencil and paper, consider providing alternatives for responding on the recording forms (e.g., verbal communication, completing the form on a computer). MMAE
  • For ELLs: Help contextualize the events in the book by making connections to Llama Llama Time to Share. When Molly Lou meets Gertie, remind students that Gertie is a new friend and they will play together, just like when Llama met Nelly Gnu.

B. Play and Exploration: Drop the Handkerchief Game (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:

“I can ask questions to learn about my classmates.”

  • Explain that today students will ask more than one question to learn about a classmate!
  • Invite them to take out their imaginary bow and aim at the target.
  • Explain that later in the lesson, students will ask their partner this question:

“Would you prefer to play with toys now or long ago?”

  • Tell students that two activities will help them to learn more about toys from long ago: playing a game and reading a text. First, the class will play a game!
  • Show students a handkerchief (or other cloth) and explain that now the class will learn how to play a game from long ago called Drop the Handkerchief.
  • Explain that this game was played long ago by many children around the world, and it is similar to a game we play today (Duck, Duck, Goose).
  • Give clear and brief directions for how to play the game, referring to the Drop the Handkerchief game directions as needed.
  • As time permits, play one or two rounds of the game, reinforcing directions as needed.
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What experience have you had with a game similar to this one? Do you know any games like this that you play at home?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group.
  • Ask:

“Did you move safely with your body while you played the game?”

  • Invite students to self-reflect by showing a thumbs-up if they moved safely and a thumb to the side if they did not move safely.
  • Refer students to the Commitments for Playing Together anchor chart as needed.
  • For ELLs: Be cognizant that Duck, Duck, Goose may not be culturally relevant to all students. Consider pre-teaching the game to the class during free time/recess in the days leading up to this session so that all students build background knowledge. (MME)
  • When describing the directions for the Drop the Handkerchief game, add graphic representations of each step so that students receive the directions through multiple formats. (MMR)
  • When describing the directions for the Drop the Handkerchief game, be explicit about behavior expectations upfront (e.g., do not dive back into the circle, keep your hands and feet to yourself, so you do not trip your friends, etc.) to minimize distractions during the game. (MME)

C. Reading Aloud: Playing with Friends (10 minutes)

  • Prompt students to consider the question from earlier in the lesson:

“Would you prefer to play with toys now or from long ago?”

  • Tell students to keep their ideas in their minds for now, because they will learn more about the differences between toys now and long ago by hearing a text read aloud.
  • Using a document camera, display Playing with Friends and read the title aloud slowly.
  • Tell students you will now read the text aloud. As you do, they should look and listen closely for ways that toys now and long ago are different, or not the same.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 4–7 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What do you notice in these illustrations about how playing with friends is different from long ago and today?” (In the past, children rode scooters made of wood and they didn’t wear helmets. Today children are playing video games.)

  • While still displaying the text, read pages 8-11 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Point to the radio on page 10 and explain that it is an old-fashioned radio, and children listened to programs, just like TV shows, on the radio. They had no TVs!
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 12–19 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Explain that something handmade is something made by a person and not by a machine.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 19–22 aloud fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“How are toys long ago different from toys now?” (played different games, made of metal and plastic, listened to radio)

  • For ELLs: When discussing how toys now and long ago are different, provide options for comprehension by using a visual graphic organizer to reinforce the relationship between toys from now and those from long ago. (MMR)
  • When discussing how toys now and long ago are different, consider using a Venn diagram as a graphic organizer to help students recall information from the previous lesson and highlight the relationship between similar and different. (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Remind students that they participated in two activities today that helped them think about the toys they prefer: playing the Drop the Handkerchief game and listening to Playing with Friends.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Ways We Ask Others Questions anchor chart and review briefly, focusing on what was challenging for students in Lesson 3.
  • Tell students they are going to turn and talk about a question from earlier in the lesson. Model briefly what this should look like with a student volunteer.

1. Assign yourself as partner A and the volunteer as partner B.

2. Ask your partner:

“Would you prefer to play with toys from now or from long ago?”

3. Listen as the student volunteer shares an answer.

4. Explain that you want to know more, so you will ask another question:

“Why?”

5. Invite the student volunteer to tell you why he or she prefers toys now or toys from long ago.

6. Invite the student volunteer to ask you the same questions.

7. Model responses. (Example: “I would prefer to play with toys from long ago. I would prefer to play with toys from long ago because the game today was a lot of fun.”)

  • Tell students that now it is their turn to ask a partner the same questions.
  • Referring to the Conversation Partner chart, invite students to pair up with their predetermined talking partner and sit facing one another. Make sure students know which partner is A and which is B.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with their partner:

“Would you prefer to play with toys from now or from long ago?”

  • As students share, circulate and listen in. Notice whether students are able to ask the question and listen to their partner’s response.
  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Refocus whole group and give students specific, positive feedback on asking questions to learn more about their classmates. (Example: “Sam, I like how you asked your partner the question and listened carefully to his response.”) Refocus students and repeat the process with partner B.           
  • Minimize potential threats to students by emphasizing that there are no right or wrong responses in this activity. Instead, students only need to be able to explain why they prefer one toy over the other. Promote an accepting and supportive classroom climate by explaining that some students might disagree on which toy they prefer, and that is okay. (MME, MMAE)
  • To vary the methods of response, provide alternative means of conveying student responses, such as pointing to the type of toy they prefer or writing/drawing it on a piece of paper. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Discuss and practice using the word because. Write the word because on the board and have students chorally repeat it. Say: “We use the word because to say why and to give reasons.” Model using because: “I like to play with toys because they are fun. Invite students to practice using because: “Turn and talk with your partner. Why do you like building with blocks?” (I like building with blocks because ______).

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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