Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Classmates’ Toy Preferences | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M1:U3:L13

Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Classmates’ Toy Preferences

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.K.6: Speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.
  • L.K.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can share my writing using a strong and clear voice. (SL.K.6, L.K.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress toward the standards listed for this lesson (see Assessment Overview and Resources) (SL.K.6).
  • During Work Times B and C, listen for students making progress toward SL.K.6 as they present their writing and answer visitors’ questions (SL.K.6).
  • Collect students’ reflection forms from the Closing and Assessment to assess their progress toward L.K.6.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Song and Movement: Singing Songs about Toys (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Choral Reading: Letter Back to the Principal (5 minutes)

B. Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Writing (15 minutes)

C. Developing Language: Teaching Others about Playing with Our Classroom Toys (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • In this lesson, which serves as the culmination of this module, students will have the opportunity to share their performance task writing and learning from the module with visitors. Sharing and celebrating work not only supports students’ speaking and listening skills, but also cultivates a sense of pride and ownership in the work.
  • During the Closing and Assessment, students reflect on their learning using the Module Reflection response sheet. This exercise is meant to provide them with time to formally keep track of and reflect on their own learning. This self-reflection supports metacognition and pride in work and learning.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students present the songs and poems they have learned throughout the unit to an audience.
  • This lesson provides a structure for students to share their performance task writing from Lessons 11–12 with an authentic audience during Work Time B.
  • Students share and reflect on their learning from the entire module during Work Time C and the Closing and Assessment.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may feel uncomfortable sharing their writing with visitors. Ensure that they have had time to practice and provide support and encouragement as necessary.
  • Some students may have difficulty recalling something they have learned or are proud of during the Closing and Assessment. Encourage them to use visuals around the room to prompt their memory if needed.

Down the road:

  • In this module, students began to learn about and practiced being ethical people as they learned about taking care of others and classroom materials and understanding perspective. In Module 2, students will learn more sophisticated words associated with ethical behavior: respect, compassion, integrity, and empathy.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the, “Toys from Long Ago” song and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Create name tags for students and visitors.  This will support the conversation during Work Times B and C.
  • Determine student presentation groups for Work Times B and C and create an accompanying visual (see supporting materials). Ideally, there will be four students and one or two visitors per group. Make sure students have practiced reading aloud the Letter Back to the Principal before they formally share it with the principal during Work Time A.
  • Distribute in advance:
    • Materials for Work Time B at student tables. Distribute the Performance Task Response Sheet: Student Version to tables based on student presentation groups.
    • Materials for Work Time C at student tables. Prepare baskets of various classroom toys and place one basket on each table. Place the Toys and Play Questions for Visitors sheet under each basket of toys.
  • Prepare the Module Reflection recording form and attach it to clipboards for the Closing and Assessment. Do not distribute in advance.
  • Post: Learning target, “Toys from Long Ago” song, “Toys We Love” song, Letter Back to the Principal, “Jack-in-the-Box” poem and “Little Ball” poem.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students singing the, “Toys from Long Ago” and “My Favorite Toys” song, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time B: If you recorded students saying the, “Jack-in-the-Box” poem, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time C: If you recorded students saying the, “Little Ball” poem, play this recording for them to join in with.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1 and K.I.C.9

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the opportunity to use oral language in a structured way and to celebrate and take pride in their hard work.
  • ELLs may find it challenging or intimidating to speak in front of an audience. Encourage them and assist them with light prompting if necessary. If students would prefer not to present, encourage them but refrain from forcing them.
  • Some students may be confused as to why unfamiliar people will be participating in class during this lesson. Be clear that everyone is a friend and that they are visiting because they want to see the work students have been doing. Check to make sure all students understand what to expect so that they are not surprised or stressed by the visitors.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Take note of areas in which students struggle with oral presentations, such as projecting their voices or enunciating their words. Focus instruction in subsequent units on their challenges. Focus on aspects that obscure meaning such as stress and intonation.

For heavier support:

  • Allow students to present their work in partnerships. When one student gets stuck, they can “tag team” the other to continue the presentation.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Opening, students perform the various poems and songs that they learned throughout the module. Provide visual cues for students to reference for the words and movements as they perform. This will minimize the threat of public performance and facilitate participation from all students.
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): As students reflect on their learning in the Closing and Assessment, provide access to the book and materials from this module to cue their thinking and serve as models for their drawing. This will help them synthesize all their learning from the entire module.
  • Multiples Means of Engagement (MME): As part of the celebration, students present their work to special visitors and their classmates. Consider being flexible in how students share their work. Some may be more comfortable one-on-one with a visitor than with the whole group.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • reflect (L)

Materials

  • Document camera (optional)
  • “Toys from Long Ago” song (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • “My Favorite Toys” song (from Lesson 7; one to display)
  • Letter Back to the Principal (from Lesson 12; one to display)
  • “Jack-in-the-Box” poem (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Performance Task Response Sheet: Student Version (from Lesson 12; one per student)
  • Presentation Groups chart (new; teacher-created; see supporting materials)
  • Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 12)
  • Toy baskets (from Lessons 9–10; one per table)
  • Toys and Play Questions for Visitors (one per visitor)
  • Module Reflection response sheet (one per student)
  • Clipboard (one per student)
  • “Little Ball” poem (from Lesson 6; one to display)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Song and Movement: Singing Songs about Toys (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Tell them that today is an exciting day because they are going to share the songs and poems they have learned with their special visitors.
  • Invite students to stand up.
  • Using a document camera, display the “Toys from Long Ago” song.
  • Invite students to join you as you sing the song aloud.
  • Repeat this process with the “My Favorite Toys” song.
  • Invite the visitors to applaud students’ performances.
  • For ELLs: To minimize risks for public performance, ensure that students have accessible visual cues for the words and movements to the song. (MMR, MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Choral Reading: Letter Back to the Principal (5 minutes)

  • Give students specific positive feedback on their singing. (Example: “I noticed that you used loud and clear voices. This helped our audience understand the words you were singing very clearly.”)
  • Invite students to sit down in the whole group gathering space.
  • Tell them that they will now read aloud their letter to the principal.
  • Direct students’ and guests’ attention to the posted Letter Back to the Principal and use a pointer to guide students through a choral reading of the letter.
  • After the choral reading, invite the principal to ask any follow-up questions.
  • Offer support and guidance to students as necessary.
  • For ELLs: To model fluent reading, read each line of the Letter Back to the Principal first and then have the students repeat the line back to you. (MME)

B. Speaking and Listening: Sharing and Celebrating Our Writing (15 minutes)

  • Ask students to stand up and direct their attention to the posted “Jack-in-the-Box” poem.
  • Invite students to join you as you recite the poem.
  • Ask students to sit down once again in the whole group gathering area.
  • Tell them they will now share their writing about a classmate’s favorite toy with the visitors.
  • Briefly explain that they will gather in small presentation groups with a few other classmates and one or two visitors. Once they are in their groups, they will take turns sharing their Performance Task Response Sheet: Student Version.
  • Move students into predetermined groups using the Presentation Groups chart. Explain that the chart tells who is in their group as well as which order they will present in.
  • Remind students that they practiced reading their writing aloud in the previous lesson.
  • Direct their attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:

“I can share my writing using a strong and clear voice.”

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target.
  • Briefly review the Ways We Share Our Work anchor chart.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“While other students are sharing, what should you do?” (keep voices off, listen carefully, look at the speaker)

  • Explain that once the first reader has shared, they should move to the second reader, and so on. Answer clarifying questions.
  • Ask the visitors to help keep the group moving along and offer support as needed.
  • Invite students to move with their small group to their own area in the room and encourage the first student to begin sharing.
  • Circulate as students share and offer guidance and support as necessary.

Closing A – 

  • Some students may be intimidated by the requirements for public display in this activity. Consider varying the social demands of the task by allowing some students to share with a visitor one-on-one rather than to a small group. (MME, MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Publicly celebrate the work of various ELLs in the class. Make a point to name areas in which students have improved, especially those who may have required additional support.

C. Developing Language: Teaching Others about Playing with Our Classroom Toys (20 minutes)

  • Refocus whole group. Explain that students will now have a chance to share some of what they have learned about toys and playing together with the visitors.
  • Direct students’ attention to the toy basket at their table. Tell them that their job is to play with the toys with each other and their visitors.
  • Explain that the visitors will also ask them some questions as they play so they can find out more about what the students have learned during their study of toys and play.
  • Remind students that they practiced answering these questions in Lesson 12.
  • Invite students and visitors to move back to students’ tables and begin playing with the toys. Remind the guests that the Toys and Play Questions for Visitors sheet is located under the basket of toys.
  • Encourage visitors to ask the questions on the Toys and Play Questions for Visitors sheet as appropriate.
  • Circulate as students and visitors play, and listen in as students respond to the visitors’ questions.
  • Provide frequent time checks so students anticipate cleanup.
  • With 5 minutes remaining, signal students to clean up.
  • As students clean up, place the Module Reflection response sheets and clipboards in the whole group area for use during the Closing and Assessment.
  • Refocus the whole group. Give students specific positive feedback on sharing their learning with the visitors. (Example: “I noticed that you did a great job of listening carefully to the visitors’ questions and then responding to them clearly.”)
  • As a culmination to the visit, invite students to stand up and recite the “Little Ball” poem.
  • Thank the visitors for coming and invite them to leave.
  • Consider varying the level of sensory stimulation in this activity as necessary. Example: Provide some students with a smaller number of toys and allow them to talk one-on-one with a visitor. This will help them to participate in the activity and follow classroom expectations for behavior. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes)

  • Gather students back together in the whole group area.
  • Explain that they will now have a chance to reflect on their learning about toys and play.
  • Briefly define reflect. Say:

“When we reflect, we think about something we have done or learned.”

  • Using a document camera, display the Module Reflection recording form.
  • Read the first prompt aloud:
    • “What is one thing you learned about toys?”
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is something you have learned about toys or playing in this module?” (Responses will vary but may include: People prefer different toys, toys can be lots of different shapes and sizes, or imagination is the best toy.)

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Explain that students will now have a few minutes to draw a picture that shows one thing they have learned.
  • Direct their attention to the appropriate space for their drawing using the displayed Module Reflection recording form. Ask students to put their finger on it.
  • As students draw, circulate and ask them to tell you what they learned. Scribe a short phrase on their recording form.
  • After a few minutes, refocus the whole group.
  • Repeat this process with the second prompt on the recording form:
    • “What is one thing you learned about playing with others?”
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their hard work and thinking, and explain that they will begin a fun new topic of study in the coming days. (Example: “Sharing and taking turns is important; You should include others; Use kind words).
  • If time permits, close the lesson by singing a song from the module.
  • On the Module Reflection response sheet, consider using graphic cues to help students identify the question. Example: Include a picture of a toy for the first question and a picture of children playing together for the second question. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Provide multiple resources to prompt students’ ideas during their reflection. Allow students access to the books and materials used in this module to use as a model for their thinking and drawing. (MME, MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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