Speaking and Listening: Toy Preferences | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA GK:M1:U2:L5

Speaking and Listening: Toy Preferences

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.K.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.K.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others and taking turns speaking about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.K.1b: Continue a conversation through multiple exchanges.
  • L.K.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.K.1f: Produce and expand complete sentences in shared language activities.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the toys we prefer. (SL.K.1, L.K.1f)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time B, listen as students describe their preferences using sentence frames. Document student progress toward L.K.1f on the Speaking and Listening Checklist. Note those who struggle to speak in complete sentences and use that information to support and adjust instruction during subsequent lessons.
  • During Work Time C, listen to student conversations and document progress toward SL.K.1 and L.K.1f on the Speaking and Listening Checklist. Note those who struggle to speak about preference and use that information to support and adjust instruction during the Opening of Lessons 6–7.
  • Collect student drawings from the Closing. Use these work samples to support and adjust instruction during the writing and drawing portions of Lessons 6–7.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” Song (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud: Toys Galore (15 minutes)

B. Building Vocabulary: Would You Prefer? (10 minutes)

C. Structured Discussion: Toy Preferences (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Drawing and Writing: My Preferred Toy (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson invites students to ask questions about and describe toys as they seek to clarify their understanding, connect with prior knowledge, and compare and contrast toys. Students are encouraged to engage with their peers as they orally rehearse discussing preference before writing and drawing about it later in the unit.
  • During Work Time A, students are introduced to Toys Galore by Peter Stein, which will be used in a series of focused read-aloud sessions in subsequent lessons.
  • During Work Time B, students are introduced to the idea of preference through a game, building their conceptual understanding of this important academic vocabulary word.
  • During Work Times B and C, students practice speaking about and describing preferences, supporting the development of expressing a claim and supporting that claim with evidence.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This lesson builds upon the depth of knowledge and vocabulary students have built about describing toys using attributes. Students will use this growing bank of vocabulary and oral language skills as they write about and describe the toys they prefer.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they practice speaking about preference by encouraging the use of sentence frames and the attribute anchor charts developed during previous lessons.

Down the road:

  • Throughout this unit, students repeatedly return to discussing the toys in their classroom, whether it is describing them using attributes or speaking about toy preferences. Subsequent lessons will build upon knowledge and vocabulary gained from closely examining and describing toys. In Lessons 6–8, students will listen to sections of Toys Galore and ask and answer questions to continue building vocabulary to describe toys.
  • During the Opening of this lesson, students learn the “Toys in Our Class” song. They will practice the song throughout the remainder of the unit and will perform it for the principal in Lesson 10.
  • The Would You Prefer? Activity, introduced in Work Time B, becomes the Opening routine in Lessons 6–8 and allows students to build language for speaking about preference.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display Toys Galore and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Prepare:
    • “Toys in Our Class” song by writing it on chart paper
    • Toys and Play Word Wall cards for the words bounce and galore. Write or type the words in large print on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
  • Would You Prefer? index cards: Write sets of two choices on index cards, using one index card for each choice. Label one choice as “A” and one choice as “B.” See the supporting materials for an example.
  • Distribute materials for Closing A at student tables.
  • Preview the Building Vocabulary game in Work Time A to ensure there is space to accommodate the game. If space does not allow for movement within the classroom, consider students indicating choices by standing (Choice A), kneeling (Choice B), or sitting (Choice C).
  • Post: Learning targets, “Toys in Our Class” song, Color Words anchor chart, Size Words anchor chart, Shape Words anchor chart, Texture Words anchor chart, Think-Pair-Share anchor chart, Discussion Norms anchor chart, and Conversation Partners chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: Record the whole group singing the “Toys in our Class” song and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time B: The Letter from the Principal could be an email.
  • Work Time C: Record students as they discuss in pairs to listen to later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Students use drawing apps or software to draw and label their preferred toy, for example Kids Doodle plug-in for Google or app for Apple products.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards K.I.A.1, K.I.A.3, K.I.B.5, K.II.B.3, and K.II.B.5

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through songs, sentence frames, and peer interaction.
  • ELLs may find the concept of preference challenging to comprehend at first. They may benefit from more visual supports and more concrete examples.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • The abundance of charts and referential information will be helpful for ELLs. Invite advanced or intermediate proficiency students to give the class a tour of the charts introduced in prior lessons. Invite them to paraphrase the information available on each chart and how it is useful.

For heavier support:

  • Use classroom examples to build schema around the concept of preference. Examples: “Which book do you like more, Toys Galore or Llama Llama Time to Share? What subject do you like? Do you prefer reading or math?”

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): As you prepare the “Toys in Our Class” song on chart paper, include illustrations to clarify key words.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): As students listen to Toys Galore, provide individual whiteboards and dry-erase markers as an option for students to record (in drawing or writing) the ways the author describes toys.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): This lesson offers multiple opportunities for students to state preferences. During the Would You Prefer? game and the Think-Pair-Share, create an accepting classroom climate by legitimizing multiple perspectives. Support students to understand that they might not prefer the same things as their peers, and that is okay.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • prefer (L)
  • galore, bounce (T)

Review:

  • text (L)

Materials

  • “Toys in Our Class” song (written on chart paper; one to display)
  • Color Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Shape Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Size Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Texture Words anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Toys Galore (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Word Wall cards (teacher-created; two; see Teaching Notes)
  • Toys and Play Word Wall (from Unit 1, Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Letter from the Principal (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Would You Prefer? index cards (class set)
  • Would You Prefer? index cards (example, for teacher reference)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Conversation Partners chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Classroom Toys chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 1)
  • Blank paper and pencil (one each per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: “Toys in Our Class” song (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Tell them that they will learn a new song today. Explain that it is important they learn and practice the song because they will sing it for the principal in a few days.
  • Briefly explain that this song is all about many of the toys they have been playing with, describing, and sorting in previous lessons. Tell them that today they will continue to talk about the toys in the classroom using the attributes they have learned to describe toys.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted “Toys in Our Class” song.
  • Invite them to follow along as you sing it the first time.
  • Point to each word as you model singing the song for students.
  • Invite students to quietly and quickly stand up.
  • Sing the song together as a group. Repeat once or twice as time permits.
  • Invite students to be seated again.
  • Remind them that during previous lessons, they explored and described a lot of the toys that were named in the song.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are some ways that you could describe the toys that are listed in the song?” (Puppets are soft; play dough is squishy; play dough is green, red, blue, and yellow; blocks are hard and come in different shapes.)

  • If necessary, guide students to share about the attributes (shape, color, size, texture) of the toys listed in the song. Refer students to the Color Words anchor chart, Shape Words anchor chart, Size Words anchor chart, and Texture Words anchor chart as necessary.
  • Tell students:

“The song tells us about the things we can do with some of the toys in our classroom. During today’s lesson and the next few lessons, we’re going to be reading, writing, and drawing to help us describe the toys we like and the ways we play with them.”

  • As you invite students to the whole group area, provide differentiated mentors by strategically seating students who may feel more comfortable reciting aloud with physical motions near students who may not feel as comfortable. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: As you prepare the “Toys in Our Class” song on chart paper, include illustrations to clarify key words. Example: Post photographs of each toy next to each corresponding verse. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As you are singing the “Toys in Our Class” song, vary methods for response by generating movements for particular key words. Example: When singing the words build and stack, stack hands on top of one another. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: Toys Galore (15 minutes)

  • Remind students that a text is something they read.
  • Say:

“In previous lessons, we read Toy Riddles. Today we will read a text called Toys Galore.”

  • Define galore for students. Say:

“Galore means to have a lot of something. The title of this book means there are a lot of toys.”

  • Using the document camera, display Toys Galore.
  • While still displaying the text, read pages 1–4 of Toys Galore aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption, pointing to each word as you read it.
  • Pause after reading page 4. Say:

“I notice that the author doesn’t really use that many color words or shapes to describe these toys. He uses words that describe how the toys are played with. For example, here it says ‘bouncing-ball toy.’ The phrase he uses to describe the ball is “bouncing-ball” because a ball bounces. Bounce means to go up and down, like a ball after it hits the ground.”

  • Place the Word Wall card and picture for bounce on the Toys and Play Word Wall.
  • Invite students to continue listening for words to describe the way toys are played with.
  • Continue reading Toys Galore aloud and pause after reading page 13.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What words does the author use to describe toys?” (zig-zig, bounce, squish)

  • Finish reading Toys Galore aloud.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“After listening to this text, what new words did you hear to describe toys?” (zippy-quick, bubbly, squeaky, futuristic, snuggly)

  • Tell students that in Toys Galore, the author describes toys by using words to show the ways we can play with them. Tell students that in the next lesson, they will listen to parts of Toys Galore again and really focus on the words the author uses to describe the ways we play with toys.
  • For ELLs: Collect an assortment of toys to display during the read-aloud that will illustrate some of the attributes featured in Toys Galore. Example: When discussing the word bounce, display a bouncy ball and demonstrate how it bounces. (MMR)
  • Before you begin reading, provide whiteboards and dry-erase markers as an option for students to record (in drawing or writing) the ways the author describes toys. This will also help scaffold active listening for key details. (MMR, MMAE)

B. Building Vocabulary: Would You Prefer? (10 minutes)

  • Read the Letter from the Principal. Point out the word prefer and tell students that prefer means to like one thing more than something else. Help students understand the meaning by giving a few examples:
    • “I prefer summer to winter.”
    • “If I have to choose between chocolate or vanilla ice cream, I prefer chocolate.”
  • Tell students they will be talking a lot about the types of classroom toys they prefer. This will help them get ready to describe these toys and why they prefer them so they can respond to the Letter from the Principal.
  • Tell students that they are going to learn a new game called Would You Prefer? to help them learn how to share and describe the things they prefer.
  • Explain that in this game, you will read two choices and they have to think about which one they prefer. Tell them that based on what they choose, they will move to a different part of the room. Point out where students who prefer the “A” choice will go and where students who prefer the “B” choice will go. Tell students that if they don’t prefer either choice, they should remain in their spot.
  • Model what students will do as they engage in the game:

1. Read the first set of choices from the Would You Prefer? index cards as you hold up the index cards that correspond with them:

“Would you prefer cheese pizza or pepperoni pizza or neither?” Refer to the Would You Prefer? index cards (example, for teacher reference).

2. Think aloud:

“I prefer cheese pizza, and since that is choice A, I’m going to go to the side of the room for ‘A’ choices.”

3. Model moving safely and courteously to the “A” choice area.

4. Model providing a reason behind your preference. Say:

“I prefer cheese pizza because I like my pizza to be plain and I love cheese.”

5. Return to your spot in the whole group area.

  • Read the next set of choices from the Would You Prefer? index cards.
  • Invite students to make their selections and move to the appropriate area. Give reminders for safe and courteous movements as necessary.
  • Once students have made their selections, ask a few students to share out, using the sentence frame: “I prefer _____ because _____.” Ask:

“Why is that your preference?”

  • Repeat with other sets of choices from the Would You Prefer? index cards as time permits.
  • For ELLs: If the choices provided to illustrate preference rely too heavily on culturally specific background knowledge, use examples from the classroom. Example: “Would you prefer crayons or markers?”(MMR)
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask about the word or in the Would You Prefer? prompts. Example: “What does the word or tell me? Can I have both pepperoni pizza and cheese pizza?” (You can have only one, not both.)
  • For ELLs: For the Would You Prefer? cards, embed visual supports by including photographs or hand-drawn icons representing each choice. (MMR)
  • Create an accepting classroom climate as you demonstrate playing Would You Prefer? by legitimizing multiple perspectives. Example: “If I prefer cheese pizza, it is not bad for someone else to prefer pepperoni pizza. We might not prefer the same things as others, and that is okay.” (MME)

C. Structured Discussion: Toy Preferences (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:

“I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the toys we prefer.”

  • Draw students’ attention to the phrase participate in conversations. Remind students that to participate in a conversation means taking turns talking with one or more partners. Refer to the Discussion Norms anchor chart as necessary.
  • Tell students that now that they have practiced picking preferences and explaining preferences, they are going to have a conversation with their partner about a classroom toy they prefer.
  • Invite students to find their conversation partners and be seated next to them. Point out the Conversation Partners chart and remind them that they can remember who their conversation partner is by looking at the chart.
  • Post the Classroom Toys chart and direct students’ attention to it.
  • Tell students that they will pick a classroom toy from the chart that they prefer and explain to their conversation partner why they prefer it using the Think-Pair-Share protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 1. Review as necessary, using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart. See the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.
  • Briefly model with a volunteer how to Think-Pair-Share about which classroom toy you prefer and why:

1. Assign yourself as partner A and the volunteer as partner B.

2. Think: “What classroom toy do you prefer and why do you prefer it?”

3. Pair: Teacher and student face each other.

4. Share: Share what toy you prefer and why you prefer it, using a sentence frame, and then invite the volunteer to do the same.

5. Make a bridge with your arms to show that both partners have shared.

  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with their conversation partners.
  • Remind them to use sentence frames as necessary: “I prefer ______ because _____.” “I like _____ best because _____.” “My favorite is ______ because _______.”
  • Circulate and listen as students discuss, noting those who have difficulty speaking about preference. Listen for use of the word prefer and use of toy attributes as reasons for preferences.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and offer specific positive feedback on their conversations. (Example: “I noticed that everyone described the reasons behind their toy preferences.”)
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about this sentence from the learning target: “I can participate in conversations with my classmates about the toys we prefer.” Examples:
    • “What does the phrase participate in conversations mean?” Use hand gestures to signal participation. (take turns talking)
    • “Who are we talking to? How do you know?” (We are talking to our friends. It says “with classmates.”)
    • Underline the word classmates. “Point to someone who is your classmate.” (anybody in the room)
    • Underline the word about. “When you see about in a sentence, it will tell you the topic. What is the topic?” Reread the sentence. (toys)
    • “What kind of toys exactly?” (toys we prefer)
    • “What is another way of saying toys we prefer? (toys we want to play with more than other toys)
    • Think about a toy you prefer. Think about a toy you want to play with more than other toys. What is it?” (I prefer ______.)
  • As you review the Think-Pair-Share protocol, create an accepting classroom climate by prompting students to consider how to respond if their partner shares a preference with which they don’t agree. Example: “Your partner might share a preference for a toy that you do not prefer. What might you do or say that will let your partner know you can still be friends even if you do not like exactly the same things?” (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Drawing and Writing: My Preferred Toy (10 minutes)

  • Invite pairs of students to return back to their workspace arm-in-arm.
  • Share with students that, in the next few lessons, they will write and draw about classroom toys using all the words they have learned to describe the classroom toys.
  • Remind students that today they picked their preferred classroom toy and discussed reasons for their preference with a partner. Tell them that in future lessons, they will draw their preferred classroom toy and that today they will make a practice drawing.
  • Direct students’ attention to the blank paper and pencils at their workspace.
  • Invite students to create a drawing of their preferred classroom toy and encourage them to use labels as they draw.
  • Collect students’ drawings as an informal assessment of their writing and drawing skills.
  • For ELLs: Before transitioning students to their workspace, ask two or three volunteers to share their preferred toys with the class. Write the ideas on the board with thumbnail illustrations. Provide differentiated models by explaining that if students still have not chosen their preferred toys, they may choose to illustrate one of the options on the board. (MMAE)
  • To help students express their ideas in the drawing and writing task, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers or colored pencils) and writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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