Unit 1 Assessment and Close Read-aloud, Session 6: The Invisible Boy, Pages 27–30 | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G2:M1:U1:L11

Unit 1 Assessment and Close Read-aloud, Session 6: The Invisible Boy, Pages 27–30

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.2.1: Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.
  • RL.2.3: Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
  • RL.2.7: Use information gained from the illustrations and words in a print or digital text to demonstrate understanding of its characters, setting, or plot.
  • W.2.8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.2.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL2.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • L.2.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 2 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can respond to questions using details from the text to support my answers. (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7, W.2.8, SL.2.1a, L.2.4)
  • I can describe what happens in the text to make Brian feel more visible. (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Work Time A, use the Reading Literature Checklist (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7) to track students’ progress toward these reading standards (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, observe and support students as they complete the Unit 1 Assessment—also the culminating task for the close read-aloud. Collect student writing and assess using the criteria on the RL checklist in the Assessment Overview and Resources.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 6: The Invisible Boy, Pages 27–30 (20 minutes)

B. Unit 1 Assessment: Writing in Response to The Invisible Boy (15 minutes)

C. Developing Language: Picture Sort (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: What Did We Learn about School? (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson is the final one in which students engage in a close read-aloud of The Invisible Boy. Students learn that Brian is happier at school because of the new friendship he has built with Justin. This final session allows students to practice recognizing significant events that cause a response in the main character (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7, SL.2.1).
  • In Work Time B, students reflect in writing on The Invisible Boy as they complete the Unit 1 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources) (W.2.8). This assessment also serves as the culminating task for the series of close read-alouds on this text.
  • Although this is a formal assessment of RL standards, students should experience the lesson as routine. Do not overemphasize the assessment; instead, use this as an opportunity to continue to gather meaningful data.
  • In Work Time C, students participate in a picture sort to better understand the central message of the text: Treat others well.  In the Closing, students add to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart with their new ideas about school after reading this text.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Similar to Lessons 6–10, students engage in the close read-aloud by answering text-based questions orally after listening to a section of the text. Similar to previous lessons, students also respond in writing to the text.
  • In the Closing, students discuss what this text has taught them about school. They should use information gained from previous lessons and discussions to add “Learn how to include and treat others well” and “Appreciate and learn about the qualities of others” to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In Work Time A, students listen and respond to a close read of the text. To help students focus, consider creating different types of seating arrangements (pillows, chairs, benches, standing, etc.).
  • In Work Time B, students are asked to do their writing and drawing independently. To help them use their time wisely, consider doing a picture walk of the book to refresh students about the events in the story.
  • In Work Time B, students write and draw independently at their desks in response to a reading prompt. To gain the most valuable information on RL standards from all students, visit with those who may feel less comfortable with writing so that they may orally share their response with you. Capture their responses to assess the students on their RL knowledge.
  • Consider showing students the work they’ve done in the past few lessons and explaining how similar it is to what they’re being asked to do on the Unit 1 Assessment.

Down the road:

  • In this lesson, students complete a culminating task in which they demonstrate their ability to answer text-based questions using details from the text. Students will continue to practice and build on this skill throughout the rest of the school year.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display The Invisible Boy and other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Prepare:
    • Unit 1 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
    • Two sentence strips, one labeled “respect” and one labeled “compassion.”
  • Distribute pencils and the Unit 1 Assessment at students’ workspaces. Doing this in advance helps ensure a smooth transition during Work Time B.
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: The Invisible Boy (Session 6) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students.
  • Gather tape (or something else to stick the scenarios on top of the sentence strips).
  • Post: Learning targets, Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, Brian’s Change anchor chart, and Module Guiding Question anchor chart.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time B: Students can complete their independent writing using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc.
  • Closing A: If you recorded students participating in the Think-Pair-Share protocol in Lesson 1, play this video for them to remind them of what to do.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 2.I.A.1, 2.I.B.6, 2.I.B.8, and 2.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 6–10. Students have the opportunity to work with the same text during the assessment that they have been reading closely for several days.
  • The Unit 1 Assessment may be challenging for ELLs, as it is a big leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction for some. ELLs will be asked not only to independently apply cognitive skills developed in Lessons 1–10, but also to independently apply new linguistic knowledge introduced in those lessons.
  • Allow students to review language displayed on the Word Wall, anchor charts, and other environmental resources.
  • Ensure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment prompts themselves. See additional support in the lesson.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During the Closing, students add new understandings to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart. Consider providing options for comprehension by adding a scanned image of Justin and Brian to illustrate “including and treating others well.”
  • Multiple Means of Action and Expression (MMAE): During the picture sort in Work Time C, provide options for communication by inviting the entire class to act out Brian’s feelings with facial expressions.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Before students begin the Unit 1 Assessment, emphasize process and effort by discussing that the purpose of assessments is to help teachers plan their next lessons. 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • respect, compassion (L)

Materials

  • “Learning Target” poem (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6)
  • Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: The Invisible Boy (from Lesson 6; Session 6; for teacher reference)
    • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7) (for teacher reference, see Assessment Overview and Resources)
    • Respect and Compassion scenario cards (for teacher reference)
    • Respect and Compassion sentence strips (two; teacher-created; see Teaching Notes)
    • Tape (used by the teacher to adhere the sentence strips to the board)
    • Brian’s Change anchor chart (begun in Lesson 8; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
    • Brian’s Change anchor chart (for teacher reference)
    • Brian’s Change picture set (from Lesson 8)
    • The Invisible Boy (from Lesson 6; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Unit 1 Assessment: Writing in Response to The Invisible Boy (one for display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Module Guiding Question anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2; added to during the Closing; see supporting materials)
  • Think-Pair-Share anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Module Guiding Question anchor chart (for teacher reference)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:

“I can respond to questions using details from the text to support my answers.”

“I can describe what happens in the text to make Brian feel more visible.”

  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What is the second learning target asking you to do today?” (give details about what happens to make Brian feel better/more seen)

  • Invite students to take out their imaginary bows and take aim at the target as you recite the “Learning Target” poem.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Invite students to give themselves a pat on the back as you read the things listed on the chart (reread important parts of the text, look closely at pictures, act out important parts of the text, listen carefully to the words, talk with classmates about the text).
  • Direct students’ attention to the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart.
  • Remind students that they will need to use the chart during the close read-aloud to discuss and answer questions.
  • For ELLs: Ask students to recall and describe one way that they worked toward the learning targets in the past five lessons.
  • When reading behaviors listed on the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart, provide options for physical action by asking students to act out each one. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 6: The Invisible Boy, Pages 27–30 (20 minutes)

  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for The Invisible Boy using the Close Read-aloud Guide: The Invisible Boy (Session 6; for teacher reference). Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist and/or the Reading Literature Checklist (RL.2.1, RL.2.3, RL.2.7) during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Refer to the guide for the use of:
    • Respect and Compassion scenario cards
    • Respect and Compassion sentence strips
    • Tape
    • Brian’s Change anchor chart
    • Brian’s Change anchor chart (for teacher reference)
    • Brian’s Change picture set
    • The Invisible Boy
  • For ELLs: Pair students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model during the read-aloud, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During the close read-aloud, provide sentence frames for Think-Pair-Shares. (Example: “Brian felt invisible because ______.”) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: During the close read-aloud, display the text on a document camera or display an enlarged copy of the text to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page. (MMR)
  • As students prepare for the close read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)

B. Unit 1 Assessment: Writing in Response to The Invisible Boy (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that their Unit 1 Assessment: Writing in Response to The Invisible Boy is already at their workspace.
  • Remind students how to transition back to their seats for independent work, as necessary.
  • Invite students to move back to their seats.
  • Focus students on the first question at the top of the assessment:
    • “How does Brian feel at lunch?”
  • If students would benefit from additional scaffolding, invite them to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner about what they will draw and write.
  • Invite students to begin writing.
  • Repeat this process with each additional question.
  • Circulate to support students as they write. If they are stuck, encourage them to use classroom resources (Tricky Word Wall, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts) or share their answers with you orally.
  • After 8 minutes, warn students that they have 1 minute remaining.
  • Refocus whole group and invite students to clean up their writing and drawing materials.
  • Transition students to the gathering area and focus them on the Brian’s Change anchor chart.
  • Tell students that they will review what happened in this last section of the book by filling out the Brian’s Change anchor chart together using the answers they just wrote on their paper.
  • Place the last picture from the Brian’s Change picture set on the anchor chart. Write answers on the anchor chart after students respond to each of the following questions. Refer to the Brian’s Change anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.

“How does Brian feel in this part of the story?” (happy)

“What detail in the text or picture helps you know that?” (He is smiling. It says he may not feel so invisible.)

 “What in the story makes him feel happy?” (Justin has invited him to lunch and is sharing cookies.)

“Is Brian feeling invisible or visible in this part of the story? How do you know?” (Brian feels visible now. I know because he is in all color and he is feeling really happy.)

  • Invite students to give themselves a big hug for all the hard work they have done with the book.
  • Ensure that ELLs clearly understand all assessment directions. Rephrase test directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop those who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions.
  • Before students begin the Unit 1 Assessment, emphasize process and effort by discussing the purpose of assessments. Say: “What we are doing today is similar to the response sheets you have been completing, but this is called an assessment. The purpose of an assessment is to help me know what you are learning and how well I’m teaching you. It is okay if you are not sure about how to answer one of the questions. That will just help me know what I need to teach you. Just try your best.” (MME)
  • When introducing the Unit 1 Assessment, foster collaboration and community by providing prompts that guide students in knowing when and how to ask teachers for help. (Example: “While you are writing today, you might forget what the question is. That is okay! First, try your best to sound out the words in the question. If you are still stuck, you can raise your hand for a teacher to help you read it.”) (MME) 

C. Developing Language: Picture Sort (10 minutes)

  • Invite students to sit in a circle around the whole group gathering area.
  • Take the Brian’s Change picture set off the anchor chart and place the cards in the middle of the circle.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“If I wanted to sort these pictures, what types of piles could I make?” (visible, invisible, in between)

  • Model choosing a picture and describing which pile it would belong in. (Example: “This picture of Brian at lunch shows that he is black and white and very unhappy. I will put this over here, in the invisible pile.”)
  • Select volunteers to choose a picture to describe and place in a pile. Repeat until every picture has been sorted and there are three piles.
  • Hold up the invisible pile pictures and flip through them slowly. Ask:

“What is true or the same about all of these pictures?” (They all show times when he is left out and feels sad or unwanted.)

  • Repeat the process with the visible and in-between piles of pictures.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“When might other kids feel invisible or visible at school?” (when they are not included; when they have friends)

  • For ELLs: Encourage students to verbalize their choices by introducing language that can be used during the picture sort. Example: “This picture goes in the (visible/invisible) pile because _____.” (MMAE)
  • As individual students pick up a picture, provide options for communication by inviting the entire class to act out Brian’s feeling with a facial expression. (MMAE)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: What Did We Learn about School? (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart.
  • While slowly flipping through The Invisible Boy again, invite students to Think-Pair-Share. Remind them that they participated in this protocol throughout the close read-aloud and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share anchor chart:

“What did this book teach us about why school is important?” (learning to include others and treat others well)

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Call on a few students to share out their answers whole group.
  • Add “Learn how to include others and treat others well” in the column next to “Foster character and relationships” on the Module Guiding Question anchor chart. Refer to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart (for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“How will you try to practice doing this at school?” (Responses will vary.)

  • For ELLs: Allow students to work in mixed proficiency triads instead of in pairs. Ensure that each triad has an advanced or native language proficiency student. Challenge them to use sentence frames or Conversation Cues to self-facilitate discussion. Examples:
    • “Can you say more about that?”
    • “What do you mean by that?”
    • “Can you give an example?”
  • When adding to the Module Guiding Question anchor chart, provide options for comprehension by adding a scanned image of Justin and Brian to illustrate “including and treating others well.” (MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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