Unit 3 Assessment, Part I: Using Observations of the Sun to Write Narrative Poems | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M2:U3:L8

Unit 3 Assessment, Part I: Using Observations of the Sun to Write Narrative Poems

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • W.1.3: Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events, include some details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of closure.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.4: Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.
  • L.1.1f: Use frequently occurring adjectives.
  • L.1.1j: Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences in response to prompts.
  • L.1.2b: Use end punctuation for sentences.

Daily Learning Target

I can write a narrative poem based on a model and using evidence. (W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, L.1.2b)

I can provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my classmates. (W.1.5, SL.1.4)

Ongoing Assessment

  • At the end of Work Times A and B, collect students’ “What the Sun Sees” poem verse planner and “What the Sun Sees” poem to serve as work samples demonstrating progress toward W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, and L.1.2b.
  • During Work Time A, circulate as students discuss and plan their writing with a partner. Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor progress toward SL.1.4 (see Assessment Overview and Resources). Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist again during the Closing as students debrief their feedback experience. 

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: "Sun" Song (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Preparing for Independent Writing: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 1 (15 minutes)

B. Unit 3 Assessment, Part I: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 1 (20 minutes)

C. Peer Feedback: "What the Sun Sees" Poem, Verse 1 (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson is the first of three during which students plan and write a new narrative poem. During Work Time, students use resources from past lessons to plan, write, and give feedback to a peer on verse 1 of their “What the Sun Sees” poem. Verse 1 serves as Part I of the Unit 3 Assessment (W.1.3, W.1.8, L.1.1f, L.1.1j, L.1.2b). It is crucial that students complete this part of the assessment before moving on. If necessary, build in extra writing time in the day or consider adding another writing lesson before moving on to Lesson 9.
  • During this unit, students build their understanding of the process of giving feedback. There is less concern for the content of the feedback during this unit and a prioritized focus on the feedback being specific, kind, and helpful (W.1.5).

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 4–5, students helped plan and write the “What the Moon Sees” poem, which served as a class model for how to write a narrative poem. For the Unit 3 assessment, students will closely follow a similar process for planning and writing their “What the Sun Sees” poem.
  • In Lesson 7, students analyzed the “What the Moon Sees” example and compared it against the criteria on the High-Quality Work anchor chart. This analysis served to help focus students on criteria for high-quality writing as they begin to independently write their “What the Sun Sees” poem.
  • Similar to Lesson 5, this lesson includes giving kind and specific feedback to a partner, but in today’s lesson students will focus their feedback on the criteria for high-quality work.
  • As they begin to write about what the sun “sees,” students will again have an opportunity to grapple with the idea of personification, as they did in previous lessons.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may need additional time to complete verse 1 of their narrative poem. Reallocate instructional time to provide more time for the assessment as necessary.
  • Some students may need additional support completing the independent writing portion of the Unit 3 Assessment. Consider providing those students with a written sentence frame for each verse (e.g., “It is _________. The ___________sun is _________. The sun sees __________.”)
  • For students who encounter a very high level of frustration with writing, consider offering support before the assessment or in a private location during the independent writing time. Invite struggling writers to orally process each sentence aloud and, if needed, take dictation for all or part of the piece. Although not a valid measure of the students’ ability to write a narrative poem, this scaffolded assessment will provide valuable evidence of their ability to apply what they have learned in this module.
  • Some students may find it difficult to transfer the planning from their “What the Sun Sees” poem verse planner to the “What the Sun Sees” poem. Consider having models available that show how the class transferred the information from the “What the Moon Sees” poem verse planner to the “What the Moon Sees” poem. You might also consider offering support in a small group setting to re-model this process.

Down the road:

  • Students will complete Parts II and III of the Unit 3 Assessment in Lessons 9–10.
  • Consider keeping the same partners for the planning part of the poem in Lessons 9–10.
  • During Lessons 9–11, students are reintroduced to activities that they learned in Units 1 and 2. Students will review and practice each of the activities in preparation for the end of module celebration in Lesson 13.

In Advance

  • Strategically pair students for Work Time A. Consider keeping the same partnerships across Lessons 8–10.
  • Distribute materials for Work Time B at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Prepare the Unit 3 Assessment (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • Review the Pinky Partners and Think-Pair-Share protocols. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song in Unit 1, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time A: Create the Time of Day anchor chart, Adjectives anchor chart, and What the Sun Sees anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Work Time A: Students complete the “What the Sun Sees” poem verse planner using a word-processing tool, such as a Google Doc.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.C.10 and 1.II.B.4

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 4–6. Students use a planner like the one they used to plan for writing in those lessons, and they also use familiar resources during the assessment (“What the Sun Sees” anchor chart, “What the Moon Sees” class poem, Adjectives anchor chart, Time of Day anchor chart, and Sky notebook).
  • Consider allowing time for students to review the language in the “What the Sun Sees” anchor chart, Adjectives anchor chart, and Time of Day anchor chart.
  • The assessment may be challenging for ELLs, because it is a big leap from the heavily scaffolded lessons. ELLs will be asked not only to independently apply writing skills developed throughout the unit, but to use resources as well.
  • Make sure ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supporting them with the writing skill being assessed. See additional support in the lesson.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Developing spellers will benefit from environmental support to sound out words in their writing. Some students may need explicit prompting to use environmental print when they cannot recall letter sounds or sight words. When modeling writing, emphasize process and effort by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky spelling and demonstrate how to use environmental print.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Because this is an assessment, all students need to complete the writing of verse 1 in Work Time B. However, consider flexible technologies to support the writing process. Consider offering high-tech options such as a word processor or a dictation device or low-tech options such as pencil grips or slanted desks to help with fine motor needs.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Some students may require support with limiting distractions during the assessment (e.g., using sound-canceling headphones or dividers between workspaces). Similarly, some students may require variations in time for the assessment. Consider breaking the assessment into more manageable parts and offering breaks at certain times. During the assessment, provide scaffolds that support executive function skills, self-regulation, and students’ ability to monitor progress before and after the assessment (e.g., visual prompts, reminders, checklists, or rubrics).

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • criteria, illustration, feedback (L)

Review:

  • adjective (L)

Materials

  • Sun, Moon, and Stars” song (from Unit 1, Lesson 3; one to display)
  • “What the Sun Sees” verse planner (one per student and one to display)
  • Time of Day anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Adjectives anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 4)
  • What the Sun Sees anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Sky notebook (completed in Unit 2; one per student)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • “What the Moon Sees” verse planner example (one to display)
  • “What the Moon Sees” example (from Lesson 7; one to display)
  • “What the Sun Sees” poem (one per student and one to display; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Unit 1, Lesson 4)
  • Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart (begin in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Song (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to the whole group area.
  • Remind students that throughout Unit 1, they learned two songs about the sun and moon. Tell them that now they will get to review and practice singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song in preparation for the end of module celebration.
  • Direct students’ attention to the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is the ‘Sun, Moon, and Stars’ song about?” (It’s about the position and description of the sun at different parts of the day.)

“What are some accompanying movements that we used as we sang the song?” (Answers will vary, but may include: beginning with their arms straight in the air, centered above their heads and slowly having their arms and fist lower to show the sun sinking lower.)

  • Invite students to quietly and quickly stand up.
  • Invite students to join you in singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” and completing the accompanying movements.
  • Repeat the song one or two times as time permits.
  • Provide options for physical movement as students sing the “Sun” song. (Example: Invite students to join in singing with movements as appropriate from a seated position.) (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Identify students who might be mouthing the words or not singing while the class sings chorally. If students seem to be avoiding singing, encourage them to sing without pressuring them. If students are comfortable, invite them to sing “duets” with more confident students so they can more easily hear themselves as they practice.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Preparing for Independent Writing: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 1 (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Remind students that earlier in the unit, they wrote a poem that personified the moon.
  • Tell students that today they will begin to plan and write their “What the Sun Sees” poem that describes what the sun might “see” at different times of day.
  • Display the “What the Sun Sees” verse planner.
  • Tell students that now they will work with a partner to begin planning the first verse of their “What the Sun Sees” poem using the “What the Sun Sees” verse planner.
  • Point to the heading that says “Verse 1” and read each question in Column 1 aloud:
    • “What time is it?”
    • “What does the sun look like?”
    • “What is the sun doing?”
    • "What does the sun see?”
  • Tell students that they will work with a partner to discuss each of these questions.
  • Prompt students to use their resources as support:
    • Time of Day anchor chart to help them find words to describe a particular time of day
    • Adjectives anchor chart to help them find words to describe what the sun looks like during a particular time of day
    • What the Sun Sees anchor chart to help them find words to describe what the sun “sees” at a particular time of day
    • The pages in their Sky notebook that describe the sun in the morning
  • Distribute Sky notebooks and “What the Sun Sees” verse planners.
  • Move students into pre-determined pairs. Invite pairs to find a quiet location to discuss the questions on the verse planner for verse 1.
  • Circulate and support students to reference their notebooks and the various anchor charts. Prompt students with questions such as:

“What time of day will you write about?”

“What adjectives describe the sun at this time of day?”

“What is the sun doing at this time of day?”

“What does the sun ‘see’ at this time of day?”

  • Consider using the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress towards the targeted standard.
  • After 5–7 minutes, refocus students whole group. Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What time of day will your first verse be about?” (morning)

“What does the sun ‘see’ at this time of day?” (The sun sees me waking up.)

  • Again, display the “What the Sun Sees” verse planner and tell students that they will now have a chance to independently capture their thinking for verse 1 on the “What the Sun Sees” verse planner.
  • Direct students’ attention to Verse 1 and review the prompt questions as necessary.
  • Point to the box below the prompt questions. Tell students that after they are done writing an answer to each of the questions, they should draw a quick sketch in the box that shows the location and description of the sun at the specific time.
  • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin writing and drawing.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary. Prompt students to use the Time of Day anchor chart, Adjectives anchor chart, What the Sun Sees anchor chart, and their Sky notebooks as resources as they write.
  • When 1 minute remains, signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • Tell students that they will use this verse planner as they begin to write the first verse of their poem in the next part of the lesson.
  • For students who may need additional support recording their ideas in writing: Provide a partially filled-in or guided “What the Sun Sees” verse planner to help students know what to record. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: If students are paired with a partner of a more advanced proficiency level, consider changing partners so students are placed in pairs of similar proficiency. This will foster independence while providing the opportunity to assess whether they are ready to move on to writing.
  • For ELLs: Remind students that the sun doesn’t actually “see” but that the author of the poem chose to use this to make his writing more interesting. Tell students they will get to try this in their own writing.

B. Unit 3 Assessment, Part I: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 1 (20 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can write a narrative poem based on a model and using evidence.”
  • Tell students that their narrative poem will be three verses long and will describe what the sun might “see” at different times of day.
  • Right now, students will begin writing verse 1 of their poem, using their verse planner as research and the “What the Moon Sees” class poem as a model for their writing.
  • Display the “What the Moon Sees” verse planner example and “What the Moon Sees” example.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is different between the ‘What the Moon Sees’ verse planner and the final ‘What the Moon Sees’ poem?” (The final poem doesn’t have prompts or questions. The final poem is written out in complete sentences.)

  • Display the “What the Sun Sees” poem.
  • Tell students that now they will take the information from their “What the Sun Sees” verse planner and write verse 1 of their “What the Sun Sees” poem.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted High-Quality Work anchor chart and read aloud the criteria for high-quality work.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is one thing that you are going to focus on to make your writing high quality?” (make sure I have descriptive details; make sure I write neatly and spell high-frequency words correctly)

  • Point out the “What the Sun Sees” poem sheets and pencils already at the workspaces, transition students to their workspaces, and invite them to begin working.
  • Remind students to use their “What the Sun Sees” verse planner to help them write verse 1 and to write using complete sentences and correct punctuation.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts).
  • When 1 minute remains, signal students to stop working through the use of a designated sound. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief.
  • Collect students’ “What the Sun Sees” poems and tell them they will complete the remaining verses during the next two lessons.
  • Before students begin the Unit 3 Assessment, emphasize process and effort by discussing the purpose of assessments. Say: “What we are doing today is similar to the poem writing from previous lessons, but this is called an assessment. The purpose of an assessment is to help me know what you are learning and how well I’m teaching you. Give your best effort!” (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider having students paraphrase what they need to do to meet the learning target. Make sure they understand what evidence they will use to write the poem.
  • For ELLs: If students can’t complete the work independently, consider providing them with a written sentence frame: “It is _________ . The ___________ sun is _________. The sun sees __________.”  Allow time for students to grapple with completing this independent writing portion of the Unit 3 Assessment before providing the support. Grappling will help students build independence and offer an opportunity to assess what they are able to do independently.

C. Peer Feedback: “What the Sun Sees” Poem, Verse 1 (15 minutes)

  • Invite students to join in giving some silent applause for their hard work today as writers!
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can provide kind, helpful, and specific feedback to my classmates.”
  • Tell students that giving feedback to classmates is a new skill that they are learning and is one way to ensure that their work is high quality.
  • Tell them that they are now going to share their poems with a partner and give feedback to their partner about his or her poem.
  • Tell students that today when a partner shares his or her work, they are going to give kind, helpful, and specific feedback. That is feedback that tells the writer one thing that he or she did a good job with in the writing and one thing he or she could do a better job with, while still being kind.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and read aloud what is written for respect. Remind students to focus on showing respect while giving feedback.
  • Remind students that they have all worked hard on their writing, and it is important to remember that when they are giving feedback so they don’t hurt people’s feelings. It is also important to remember that we all have ways in which our writing could be better. Tell students that you are going to model giving helpful and specific feedback to a classmate, and you want them to watch how the feedback is helpful AND kind.
  • Invite a student volunteer to help you model giving kind, specific, and helpful feedback:

1. Invite the student volunteer to share his or her work with you.

2. Model giving kind feedback by pointing out something that your partner did well using the sentence frame: "You did a good job of ________."

3. Model giving helpful and specific feedback by pointing out something you think the partner could add to or change about the verse using the sentence frame: "I think you should ________ because _______."

4. Model referring to the High-Quality Work anchor chart to provide the criteria for your feedback.

5. Thank your partner for sharing his or her work with you

  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you notice about the way I gave feedback to my partner on his/her writing?” (You were nice about it; you pointed out something specific; you suggested something your partner could change.)

  • Tell students that they will now use the Pinky Partners protocol to share their work and give feedback to a partner. Remind them that they used this protocol in Unit 2 and review as necessary using the Pinky Partners Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Guide students through the protocol, encouraging them to use the following frames:
    • “You did a good job of _____________.”
    • “I think you should ________ because _________.”
  • Circulate as students share and prompt them to use the criteria on the High-Quality Work anchor chart when providing feedback. Take note of how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • After both partners have shared and offered feedback, refocus students whole group.
  • For ELLs: Consider inviting an ELL student volunteer to help you model giving kind, specific, and helpful feedback using think-aloud, the Peer Feedback sentence starters and the High-Quality Work anchor chart.
  • For students who may need additional support with auditory processing: Display a checklist for peer feedback. Example: 

1. Be kind.

2. Point out something specific.

3. Suggest something your partner could change. (MMR)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (5 minutes)

  • Offer students specific positive feedback on their conversations giving feedback to one another. (Example: “I heard Lupe giving Steven kind feedback. She told him that he did a good job of describing the morning sun with lots of details, and she suggested that he become more specific about what the sun ‘sees’ at morning time.”)
  • Remind students that throughout this unit, they are learning and practicing how to give and receive feedback that is kind, helpful, and specific.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to reflect on how well they gave and received feedback in this lesson. Remind them that they used this protocol in many previous lessons and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Invite partners to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“How did you do giving and receiving feedback?” (Responses will vary.)

“What worked well?” (Responses will vary.)

“What could you improve?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas students are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group. Document progress toward SL.1.4 using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and invite the selected students to share with the whole group.
  • Remind students that they will continue to reflect on the process of giving feedback over the next several lessons.
  • After students share their reflections, foster a sense of community and provide options for physical action by inviting students to give themselves a special applause. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider making a T chart to capture students’ ideas of “what worked well” and “what I could improve” that students could refer to and also add to as they continue to reflect on the process of giving feedback over the next several lessons.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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