Speaking and Listening: Introduction to High Quality Work | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA G1:M2:U3:L3

Speaking and Listening: Introduction to High Quality Work

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can define what it means for work to be “high quality.” (SL.1.1, SL.1.2)
  • I can analyze models of high-quality work. (SL.1.1, SL.1.2)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the Closing, use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to monitor student progress toward SL.1.1 and SL.1.2 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Building Vocabulary: Interactive Word Wall (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reading Aloud: Model of Excellence #1 (10 minutes)

B. Noticing and Wondering: Analyzing High-Quality Work (15 minutes)

C. Shared Writing: High-Quality Work Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to Face: Model of Excellence #2 (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson provides multiple opportunities for students to build their understanding and analysis of what makes a first-grade writing piece high quality. It lays the foundation for the expectations of high-quality work for first grade.
  • To help them take ownership of the expectations for future writing, students help to create the High-Quality Work anchor chart. The chart has been designed generally to apply to many genres of writing; the specifics of high-quality work for each writing genre will be introduced within the units and lessons themselves.
  • Students use models of excellence (downloaded from EL Education’s website, “Models of Excellence: The Center for High-Quality Student Work”) to analyze what makes first-grade writing high quality. Take time to look through the website to find other helpful exemplars of student work.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students continue to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol introduced in Lesson 2.
  • High-quality work is another dimension of student achievement alongside habits of character and mastery of knowledge and skills. The introduction of the High-Quality Work anchor chart builds upon the foundation of student achievement from previous units and modules.
  • Continue to use Goal 1­–3 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During the Interactive Word Wall protocol, encourage all students to interact with their classmates and the vocabulary and assure them that this routine will be practiced again and again.
  • Analyzing and pulling out the most important aspects of what makes a piece of writing “high quality” may be challenging for students. Consider allotting more time to delve into the big idea of quality and provide students with more examples of high-quality student work.

Down the road:

  • The High-Quality Work anchor chart has been designed generally so that it may be applied to all genres of writing. In this unit, the High-Quality Work anchor chart will be applied specifically to narrative poetry. The bullet “includes details” is specified for narrative poetry as word choice and the use of imagery in writing to “show, not tell.” The bullet “follows conventions” refers to the grade level conventions that are expected at each stage of learning to write. For this writing piece, they are correctly using end punctuation, writing in complete sentences, and spelling taught words correctly.
  • Students continue to develop an understanding of high-quality work as they are introduced to giving and receiving feedback for one another in Lesson 5 and compare and contrast examples and non-examples of high-quality work in Lessons 7 and 11.
  • Students will continue using the Interactive Word Wall to reinforce the understanding of adjectives and fluidity in using them in context.

In Advance

  • Determine groups of three or four students for the Interactive Word Wall protocol.
  • Prepare Interactive Word Wall cards for bright, white, and silver and add them to the set begun in Lesson 2 (see supporting materials).
  • Review the Interactive Word Wall protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Model of Excellence #1, Model of Excellence #2, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list). 

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Students take pictures of the Interactive Word Wall connections using devices. Post on a teacher web page, class blog, or portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to talk about at home with their families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free camera apps or software.
  • Create a slideshow of the Models of Excellence #1 and #2 to display. 
  • Create the High-Quality Work anchor chart in an online format, such as a Google Doc, for display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1, 1.I.A.3, and 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing two models of high-quality work, analyzing them verbally, and recording aspects of high-quality work on an anchor chart to refer back to.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to understand the meaning of the language in the models. Support students by ensuring they understand the sentences in the models before they attempt to evaluate the quality of the models. See specific suggestions in “Levels of support” and the Meeting Students’ Needs column.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Consider inviting students to add sketches to represent the meaning of the Interactive Word Wall cards in Opening A.
  • Challenge students to append the anchor chart with specific examples of what “details” and “conventions” are.

For heavier support:

  • Show a brief video or a series of photographs to set the stage for Model of Excellence #1. Example: Show a video of the lifecycle of a chrysalis. Invite students to act out the lifecycle, providing simple narration for them to repeat.
  • To help students identify details in support of Work Time C, consider beginning with simpler language. Prepare a set of cards, some with generic nouns and some with detailed nouns (e.g., girl/girl wearing blue pants). Invite students to collect the detail cards, explaining how they include details.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): To facilitate effective learning during this lesson, ensure that all students have access to the directions and feel comfortable with the expectations. Vary the ways in which you convey expectations for each activity or task. Consider engaging in a clarifying discussion about the directions or creating an outline of the steps in Work Time.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): To support students’ planning and management of information during the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, invite students to identify one or two criteria from the High-Quality Work anchor chart to use as they discuss the model. (Example: Invite students to write the selected criteria on a notecard for reference during the protocol.) This will help students keep information organized and “in mind.”
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): After the Closing, give students specific, positive feedback on their hard work and effort for the day. Foster a sense of community and provide options for physical action by inviting students to give themselves a special applause.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • high quality, analyze (L)

Materials

  • Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Interactive Word Wall cards (from Lesson 2 and new; teacher-created; one set per group)
  • Arrow cards (from Lesson 2; one set per group)
  • Model of Excellence #1 (one to display)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time C; see supporting materials)
  • High-Quality Work anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Model of Excellence #2 (one to display)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 7)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Building Vocabulary: Interactive Word Wall (10 minutes)

  • Tell students they are going to use the Interactive Word Wall protocol with new words added to the set to continue strengthening their comprehension and build their knowledge of vocabulary. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 2 and review as necessary using the Interactive Word Wall Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
    • Move students into the pre-determined small groups and distribute the Interactive Word Wall cards and arrow cards.
    • Invite students to begin the Interactive Word Wall protocol.
    • Circulate and listen in as students discuss the vocabulary. Provide support and guidance as needed by reminding students of the definitions and encouraging them to use the word in a sentence.
    • When 2 minutes remain, provide students with a time reminder.
    • Signal students to stop the protocol with the use of a designated sound. Ask them to put away the word cards and arrow cards in the designated area.
  • Direct students to move to the whole group meeting area.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is one connection you made during the Interactive Word Wall protocol?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Remind students that by continuing to practice and use these words, they are building knowledge that helps them become better readers, writers, and learners.
  • To support self-regulation and independence, provide a visual time timer and remind students that everyone may not have an equal number of turns during the protocol. Say: “I know we would like to have more turns today in making word connections, and that’s great! Even though everyone might not get the same number of turns this time, we will have many more times to make connections with our words!” (MME)
  • For ELLs: Consider inviting students to discuss the meaning of the Interactive Word Wall cards in home language groups before beginning the Interactive Word Wall protocol.
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by inviting students to paraphrase the rational for each connection in their own words. Restate or rephrase as necessary.

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reading Aloud: Model of Excellence #1 (10 minutes)

  • With excitement, tell students that they will soon begin a new writing piece, a narrative poem! Explain that to write the narrative poem, they need to think about what makes writing high quality, so today they will look at examples of high-quality writing from other first-graders.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read both aloud:
    • “I can define what it means for work to be ‘high quality.’”
    • “I can analyze models of high-quality work.”
  • Underline the words high quality in the learning target and invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What does it mean if something is high quality?” (It is really good; it’s the best.)

  • Define high quality (something that is viewed as excellent). With excitement, tell students that you have an example of high-quality writing to share today from another first-grade class!
  • Direct students’ attention back to the second learning target and underline the word analyze. Share that to analyze something means to examine it closely.
  • Display Model of Excellence #1 and read it aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • After reading, invite students to give a quick thumbs-up to show if they think that writing was high quality, or excellent.
  • When using a total participation technique, minimize discomfort and/or perceived threats and distractions by alerting individual students that you are going to call on them next. (MME)
  • For ELLs: Help build interest by telling students they will have a lot of freedom to express themselves as they write a narrative poem. In poems, there are fewer rules, so encourage ELLs to take greater risks and not worry as much about language errors.
  • For ELLs: To provide heavier support during the read-aloud, invite students to act out key sentences. Dictate lines for them to recite so that they practice using verbal language.

B. Noticing and Wondering: Analyzing High-Quality Work (15 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they are going to analyze the writing, or examine it closely, to determine what makes it high quality.
  • If productive, cue students to provide evidence and to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“What, in the Model of Excellence #1, makes you think so?” (Responses will vary.)

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Flip back through the pages of Model of Excellence #1 and invite students to give a thumbs-up when they notice something that makes this writing high quality, or excellent.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What do you notice about this writing that makes it high quality? What do you notice about how the sentences start and end?” (Responses will vary, but may include: It has complete sentences. The words explain the pictures. The words are written carefully.)

  • Flip back through the pages of Model of Excellence #1 and invite students to give a thumbs-up if they see or hear something that makes them wonder or question.
  • Ask students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What do you wonder about this writing?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Synthesize students’ noticings and wonderings by paraphrasing important aspects of high-quality work that were unearthed during the discussion. Clarify with students as needed.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to notice and wonder about what made that writing high quality. (Example: “Lamar noticed that the illustrations were beautiful, with lots of colors. Valeria wonders why the writing was done on purple paper.”)
  • Tell students that now they will use what they’ve noticed and wondered to create a High-Quality Work anchor chart that they can use when doing their own excellent writing!
  • For ELLs and students who need additional support: As students share what they noticed and wondered about the writing, provide sentence frames to support oral language processing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Invite students to elaborate on one or two of the important aspects of high-quality work, such as complete sentences and words are written carefully. Examples: “Why is this sentence a complete sentence? What if I remove the verb?” “Are these words written carefully? Why? How do they help you imagine the chrysalis?”

C. Shared Writing: High-Quality Work Anchor Chart (10 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the High-Quality Work anchor chart and invite them to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“If we want to write down a few ideas to remind us what makes something high quality, what do you think we should include?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Circulate and listen in as students share ideas with one another. As you listen, select three or four students to share out their ideas.
  • Summarize student thinking and say something like, “Wow, we all have such great ideas about what makes first-grade work high quality! I think we can put all those ideas into two categories on our High-Quality Work anchor chart”:
    • “Includes details”
    • “Follows conventions”
  • Write “includes details” on the High-Quality Work anchor chart and ask:

“What does it mean to include details in our work? What is an example of a detail?” (to say more; to show, not tell; an example is including adjectives to describe something)

  • Confirm students’ thinking and share with them that for the writing they will do in this unit, narrative poetry, they will include details by using strong adjectives, choosing appropriate words from the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall, and writing sentences that let the reader imagine the scene.
  • Reread the sentence on the third page of Model of Excellence #1 and invite students to close their eyes and imagine what the butterfly is doing and what it looks like: “A butterfly has legs with claws so they can grasp on flowers.” Explain how the sentence includes details that allow you to imagine the butterfly landing on a flower and using its claws to grasp and hold on.
  • Write “follows conventions” on the High-Quality Work anchor chart and explain that by following conventions, writers ensure that their writing looks good and is readable. Tell students that in this unit, they will follow conventions by using end punctuation (periods), writing in complete sentences, and spelling words from the Word Wall and anchor charts correctly. Refer to the High-Quality Work anchor chart (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Reread the completed High-Quality Work anchor chart for comprehension and thank students for their hard work in analyzing what it means to do high-quality work in first grade. Share that they will use this anchor chart to make sure their work continues to be high quality!
  • For ELLs: Consider modeling the turn and talk with an enthusiastic student, writing, and displaying key phrases to help guide other students.
  • For ELLs: Invite students to identify key details and conventions in What the Sun Sees, What the Moon Sees and the Model of Excellence #1.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Back-to-Back and Face-to Face Protocol: Model of Excellence #2 (10 minutes)

  • Tell students that you have one more piece of writing to share with them today, but that now they have a job to do! They are going to use the High-Quality Work anchor chart to analyze the work and decide if it is of high quality.
  • Display Model of Excellence #2 and read it aloud fluently and without interruption.
  • Tell students they are going to use the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol to discuss what makes this writing high quality. Remind them that they used this protocol in past lessons and review as necessary using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • As students discuss, circulate the room and listen in. As needed, refer students to the High-Quality Work anchor chart to back up their claims.
  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to keep track of student progress.
  • Signal students to stop the protocol with the use of a designated sound.
  • Direct students back to the whole group meeting area.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What did you see and hear in the writing that makes it high quality?” (Responses will vary, but may include: “The writer told us exactly what each person liked to play with. Each sentence starts with a capital letter.”)

  • If productive, cue students to think about their thinking:

“How does our Back-to-Back and Face-to Face protocol add to your understanding of high-quality work? I’ll give you time to think and discuss with a partner.” (Responses will vary.)

  • Provide specific, positive feedback on student analysis using the High-Quality Work anchor chart. (Example: “Mia, I heard you say that the writer used lots of details by describing what happened at the park.”)
  • Tell students that later in the unit, they will use the High-Quality Work anchor chart as they write narrative poems together and independently.
  • To reduce barriers to metacognition as students share, provide a visual reminder of the focus for what they are sharing during the protocol. (Example: Display the question on chart paper or a sentence strip or offer an index card with the question to individual students: “What makes this writing high quality?”) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Review the learning target introduced in Work Time A. Ask students to give specific examples of how they worked toward achieving it in this lesson. Invite students to rephrase the learning target now that they have more experience analyzing models of high-quality work.
  • For ELLs: Before beginning the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, focus students on the display of Model of Excellence #2 and the High-Quality Work anchor charts. Give students a minute to think about and discuss in home language groups what makes Model of Excellence #2 high quality work.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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