Close Read-aloud, Session 4 and Role-Playing Day 3: Summer Sun Risin’ | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M2:U1:L6

Close Read-aloud, Session 4 and Role-Playing Day 3: Summer Sun Risin’

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2: Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.4: Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.4a: Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Daily Learning Target

I can describe what the boy and the sun do at the end of Summer Sun Risin’.(RL.1.2, RL.1.3, RL.1.7, W.1.8, SL.1.1, SL.1.2, L.1.4a)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Session 4 of the close read-aloud in Work Time A, listen for students to describe characters, setting, and events from the end of the story using key details use the Reading Literature Checklist to track students’ progress toward RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.4, RL.1.7 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use evidence from the text as they role-play specific story elements and as they reflect on respect. (SL.1.1, SL.1.2)
  • During Work Time C, circulate and observe students as they complete the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet. Watch for students to observe and accurately describe events from the end of the story. (RL.1.3, W.1.8)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 4: Summer Sun Risin', Pages 21–26 (25 minutes)

B. Role-Playing and Reflecting on Respect, Pages 21–26 (15 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Summer Sun Risin' Response Sheet, Part II (10 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Sun Experience—Sunset (5 minutes

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson is similar in structure to Lesson 5. Students should be familiar with instructional practices and protocols introduced in previous lessons. Take note of this and allocate and adjust time as necessary.
  • In Work Time A, students continue the close read-aloud, focused on answering the question: “What is the boy doing when the sun is rising, at its highest, and setting in the sky?” During Session 4, they focus on events at the end of the story (RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.7, SL.1.2).
  • During Work Time B, students revisit the Role-Play protocol and the habit of character respect. They continue to consider specific ways to show respect when collaborating with and using supportive language with a partner. This reflection helps students understand this habit of character in a more active, concrete way.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Continue to reinforce routines established in previous lessons—specifically, Sun Movement routine. Students will practice the entire Sun Movement routine during this lesson.
  • In Lesson 5, students began writing about specific events using key details. This lesson allows for more independent writing about the ending events of Summer Sun Risin’.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • “Respect” may feel abstract; students may find it difficult to reflect on how they show respect. As students role-play, continue to name specific behaviors that show respect and give concrete examples that help students articulate their own progress toward this habit of character.
  • Some students may need additional support with making the transition to more independent writing. Consider remodeling the writing process and/or partnering students who need additional support to complete the task.

Down the road:

  • Throughout Unit 1, students will continue to reflect on their progress toward showing respect during the Role-Play protocol. As students reflect daily, consider guiding them toward more specific responses (e.g., “I showed respect by keeping my body safe when collaborating with my partner.”).

In Advance

  • Prepare Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card for the words sunset. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
  • Review the Sun Movement routine from Lesson 2 as necessary.
  • Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 4; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Note that the Close Read-aloud Guide is divided into sessions. Complete only Session 4 in this lesson; students will complete the remaining sessions in subsequent lessons.
  • Maintain student partnerships for the Role-Play protocol in Work Time B. Consider pairing students with varying levels of language proficiency. The students with greater language proficiency can serve as models in their partnership, initiating discussion and providing implicit sentence frames.
  • Pre-distribute materials for Work Time C at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • Post: Learning target and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: If you recorded students participating in the Sun Movement routine in Lesson 3, play this video for them to remind them of what to do.
  • Work Time B: Video record students role-playing to review with students in later lessons as a reminder of what happened. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video recording apps or software.
  • Work Time C: Students use drawing apps or software to draw their response—for example, the Kids Doodle plug-in for Google or app for Apple products. 

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1, 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with opportunities to read academic text closely, and to use role-play to reinforce comprehension.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend some of the academic language and syntax in Summer Sun Risin’. Guide students through the Mini Language Dive conversation during Work Time A. See Meeting Students’ Needs column for details.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • Before providing additional modeling and support during Work Time, observe students and allow them to grapple. Provide support only after students have grappled with the task. Observe the areas in which they struggle to target appropriate support.
  • During Closing and Assessment, invite students who need lighter support to share their sun experiences first.

For heavier support:

  • During the role-play in Work Time B, empower students to ask for help if they are not sure what their characters would say. Prompt students to call, “Line!” when they get stuck. Tell students that this will signal their partners to provide them with an idea of something they could say.
  • During Closing and Assessment, invite students who need lighter support to share their sun experiences first.
  • During Work Time C, work closely with a small group of students who need heavier support. Consider completing the response sheet together as a shared writing experience.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): After the close read-aloud, students are invited to discuss what the boy and sun do at the end of Summer Sun Risin’. To do so, students will need to recognize a pattern that started in the beginning of the story. Because this story is read across several days, some students may need additional support in connecting the pattern from the beginning and middle of the book to the new section read in this lesson. As you invite students to reflect on the relationship between the boy and the sun, activate background knowledge, explicitly prompting students to think about the relationship between the boy and the sun based on what students observed in the beginning and middle of the story.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Students have a range of fine motor abilities and writing needs. Some students may need additional support in order to visually plan for writing and drawing on their response sheets. Vary methods for fine motor responses, offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): Students have had multiple opportunities to learn and practice the Sun Movement routine. Some students may benefit from opportunities to be seen as a peer model. Foster community by inviting a few students to help you demonstrate the steps of the Sun Movement routine.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • sinkin’ (T)
  • sunset, setting (L)

Review:

  • retell, characters, events, respect (L)

Materials

  • Sun Movement chart (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 4; for teacher reference)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card (new; teacher-created; one)
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during the Opening and close read-aloud)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart (begun in lesson 3; added to during Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ icons (from Lesson 3; one set for teacher use during the close read-aloud)
    • Sun icon (from Lesson 3; two; for teacher use during the close read-aloud)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ word card (new; teacher-created; one)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Role-Play Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet, Part II (begun in Lesson 3; added to during Work Time C; one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to stand up and spread out inside and around the edge of the whole group meeting area. As needed, remind students to move safely and make space for everyone.
  • Remind students that in Lesson 4, they learned the rest of the steps to the Sun Movement routine. Review the steps on the Sun Movement chart.
  • Invite students to join you as you practice Steps 1–10, taking 10–15 seconds for each step.
  • Repeat once or twice as time permits.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on their work practicing all of the movements in the routine. (Example: “I noticed that everyone took great care to make sure their bodies were safe as we practiced all of the movements.”)

Meeting Students’ Needs

  • When reviewing the Sun Movement routine, foster community by inviting a few student volunteers to model Steps 1–10 for the class. (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud, Session 4: Summer Sun Risin’, Pages 21–26 (25 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:
    • “I can describe what the boy and the sun do at the end of Summer Sun Risin’.”
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What time of day do you think the end of the story takes place?” (at the end of the day)

“Where do you think the sun will be at the end of the story?” (at one corner of the page)

  • Tell students that during today’s close read-aloud session they will read to meet this target.
  • Invite students to take out their magic bows and take aim at the target.
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Summer Sun Risin’ using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 4; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist during the close read-aloud(see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Session 4, refer to the guide for the use of:
    • Summer Sun Risin’
    • Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart
    • Summer Sun Risin’ icons
    • Sun icon
    • Summer Sun Risin’ word card
  • Tell students that in the next culminating task for the close read-aloud, they will focus on retelling the important events of what the boy and the sun do throughout the story. 
  • To activate background knowledge before students discuss what the boy and sun do in the end of Summer Sun Risin’, invite students to reflect on the relationship based on what they know about the beginning and middle of the story. (Example: “Think back to what the boy and sun were doing at the beginning and middle of the story. With your partner, discuss why you think the sun will be at one corner of the page at the end of the story. What have you learned from the story so far that makes you think this might be the case?”) (MMR)
  • For ELLs: During or after Work Time A, consider returning to the Language Dive conversation introduced in Lesson 5. Review each chunk and complete practice using the sentence frame: “In the _____, the boy’s ______. The summer sun’s _____.”
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of the chunks from the text: “Pa by the door, / me tucked in bed. / Summer sun’s sleepin’, / stars overhead.” from Summer Sun Risin'. Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:
      • “What does this verse mean?” (Responses will vary.)
    • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “Pa by the door,” and ask:
      • “What is Pa doing?” (Pa is playing guitar and singing by the door.)
      • “What does the word by mean in this chunk?” (next to)
    • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “me tucked in bed” and ask:
      • “What is the boy doing?” (sleeping; lying in bed)
    • Point to and read aloud the chunks: “Summer sun’s sleepin’” and ask:
      • “What is the sun doing?” (It is gone because it is night time.”
    • Point to and read aloud the chunks: “stars overhead.” and ask:
      • “Where are the stars?” (in the sky; overhead)
      • “What two words do you see in overhead? What do you think overhead means? Point to something overhead.” (over + head; up above our heads)”
      • “Now what do you think the verse means? (Responses will vary.)”
  • “Discuss with a partner what the boy and sun are doing using the frame: In the end, the boy is _____. The sun is _____.” (sleeping; gone or set)

B. Role-Playing and Reflecting on Respect, Pages 21­–26 (15 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Offer students specific feedback on their close-reading skills used to explore the focus question: “What is the boy doing when the sun is setting in the sky?” (Example: “Everyone looked closely at the pictures and noticed that the sun was moving down on the page and that the boy was reading a story with his dad and getting ready for bed.”)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does it mean when the sun is setting?” (The sun is going down.)

  • As students share responses, confirm thinking and explain that setting means to move down. Remind students that the sun begins to go down when day begins to turn to night.
  • Invite students to create an accompanying hand gesture as they repeat the word with you.
  • Tell students that later in today’s lesson they will be writing and drawing about the ending events so today they will continue to think about, discuss, and role-play these events with a partner so they better understand them in order to do their best writing.
  • Move students into pre-determined pairs and tell them they are going to use the Role-Play protocol to act out a few of the ending events of Summer Sun Risin’. Remind them that they have been using this protocol in the past few lessons, and review as necessary using the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Working to Become Ethical People anchor chart and review it. Remind students to focus on showing respect while working with their partner during the protocol.
  • Invite students to begin the Role-Play protocol for the following sections of text:
    • Pages 21–22
    • Pages 23–24
    • Pages 25–26
  • Refocus students whole group and offer them specific, positive feedback on their third Role-Play protocol. (Example: “I noticed everyone participated and made sure their bodies didn’t distract their partner as they acted out the events from the end of the story.”)
  • Tell students they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to discuss how they showed respect during the Role-Play protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in previous lessons, and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Invite them to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“What did it look and sound like when you were showing respect during the Role-Play protocol?”

  • Offer the following sentence stems as necessary:
    • “It sounded _________, so I saw respect today.”
    • “It looked like ________, so I saw respect today.”
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas they are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group. Consider documenting progress toward SL.1.2 using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and invite a few students to share out.

Remind students that they will keep working on what respect looks like and sounds like throughout the unit.

  • When giving directions for the Role-Play protocol, foster collaboration by reminding students of strategies for resolving a disagreement. (Example: “Yesterday we discussed strategies for what to do if you have a disagreement with your role-play partner. What can we do or say to respectfully resolve our problem?”) (MME)

C. Independent Writing: Summer Sun Risin’ Response Sheet, Part II (10 minutes)

  • Display Part II of the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet and read the directions aloud.
  • Remind students that yesterday they began Part II by writing and drawing about the beginning and middle events using key details from the text. Tell them that today they will complete the response sheet by writing and drawing about the ending events of the story.
  • Direct students’ attention to the last box. As you point to the box, read the sentence frame. (“At the end …”)
  • Remind students to think about the parts they acted out for the ending of the story when completing today’s writing task.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What happened at the end of the story?” (The boy reads a book with his dad and goes to sleep.)

  • Invite students to show a thumbs-up or touch their head if they are ready to begin writing and drawing about the events from the ending of Summer Sun Risin’.
  • Point out the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheets and pencils already at student workspaces. Transition students their workspaces and invite them to begin working.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts).
  • After 5 minutes, signal all students to stop working. Model cleanup. Invite students to walk safely to the whole group gathering area. Collect student response sheets and offer specific, positive feedback on their writing and drawing. (Example: “I noticed that Samantha and Jose used pictures and words to describe events from the ending of the story.”)
  • When preparing students for independent writing, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Before inviting students to complete their Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet, model and think aloud completing it using a text familiar to all students, such as The Most Magnificent Thing. (Example: “What events happened at the end? Oh, that’s right! She created the magnificent thing! I will draw a picture of the little girl and write, ‘little girl.’”)

Closing & Assessments

Closing

A. Structured Discussion: Sun Experience—Sunset (5 minutes)

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Define setting (moving down).
  • Tell students they are going to use the Think-Pair-Share protocol to discuss what the boy experiences during sunset and what they experience during sunset. Remind students that they used this protocol earlier in today’s lesson, and review as necessary using the Think-Pair-Share Protocol anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share with an elbow partner:

“Where is the sun at sunset?” (The sun is starting to disappear in the sky.)

“What does the boy experience when the sun is setting?” (The boy is reading a book with his dad and getting ready for bed.)

“What do you experience when the sun is setting?” (I get ready for bed.)

  • Offer the following sentence stem as necessary:
    • “When the sun is setting (the sun/the boy/I) _________.”
  • As students talk, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas they are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group. Consider documenting progress toward SL.1.2 using the Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Remind students to make a bridge with their arms after both partners have shared.
  • Gather students back together and invite a few students to share with the whole group.
  • If time permits, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more and to listen carefully:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

“Who can repeat what your classmate said?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Tell students that tomorrow they will continue to think about the boys’ experiences from sunrise to sunset as they complete the close read-aloud culminating task.

There are no new supporting materials for this lesson.

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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