Close Read-aloud, Session 1: Summer Sun Risin’ | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M2:U1:L3

Close Read-aloud, Session 1: Summer Sun Risin’

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2: Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.4: Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.1: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  • L.1.1c: Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences (e.g., He hops; We hop).
  • L.1.4: Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grade 1 reading and content, choosing flexibly from an array of strategies.
  • L.1.4a: Use sentence-level context as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about the boy and the sun in Summer Sun Risin’ using key details from the text. (RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.3, and RL.1.7)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Session 1 of the close read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Literature Checklist to track students’ progress toward the RL standards listed for this lesson (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During the Closing, circulate and observe students as they complete the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet. Watch for students to observe and accurately describe character and setting. (RL.1.3, W.1.8)

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Reading "Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky," Part 4 and Introducing the "Sun, Moon, and Stars" Song (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Reviewing Close Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

B. Close Read-aloud, Session 1: Summer Sun Risin', Pages 1–28 (30 minutes) 

C. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Independent Writing: Summer Sun Risin' Response Sheet, Part 1 (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson introduces the first of a series of close read-alouds of the unit anchor text, Summer Sun Risin’ by W. Nikola-Lisa. Students strengthen their ability to understand and converse with their peers about the text as they hear it read aloud multiple times and engage actively through the use of the Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart, interactive role-playing, and text-dependent questions. At the end of Unit 1, students participate in an assessment that measures their ability to identify literary story elements such as beginning, middle, end; main character and setting; and central message or lesson of a piece of literature (RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.3, RL.1.7, SL.1.2, W.1.8).
  • A close read-aloud is an instructional practice that gives readers an opportunity to study a complex text with teacher support, for the purpose of deep comprehension. A close read-aloud of a particular text occurs in a series of short sessions (approximately 20–25 minutes each) across multiple lessons. In the first session, students hear the entire text read aloud by the teacher, without interruption. In subsequent sessions, the teacher poses a focus question to set a purpose for deeper analysis and facilitates deeper comprehension by rereading excerpts of the text with this question in mind. In each session, the teacher lifts students’ understanding of the text through purposeful text-dependent questions, interactive discussion, and other activities that support comprehension. In the final session, students synthesize their learning by answering the focus question through a culminating writing or speaking task.
  • For every close read-aloud, there is a Close Read-aloud Guide (see supporting materials). This material lays out the entire sequence of sessions. Before launching the first session with a given text, review the entire guide to have the big picture of the work students will do with that text across multiple lessons. Keep this guide in hand across the multiple lessons.
  • The pages of Summer Sun Risin’ are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with “Wake up, little one! Summer sun’s a-risin’” should be considered page 2 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Continue to reinforce routines established in Lessons 2, specifically the Sun Movement routine.
  • In Lessons 1–2, students built interest in the module topic through noticings and wonderings.  This lesson allows for a more in-depth study of the sun as students begin the close read-aloud sessions of Summer Sun Risin’.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.
  • The story “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky” was introduced in Lesson 1. In this lesson, students are introduced to Part 4 of the story, which helps introduce the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song, during the Opening.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • During the closing, students begin a new independent writing task. Some students may need additional support with making this transition. Consider remodeling the writing process and/or partnering students who need additional support to complete the task.

Down the road:

  • This is the first lesson in a series of five in which students participate in a close read of Summer Sun Risin’ and track the important details of the text on the Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart. Preview the Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 1; for teacher reference) to familiarize yourself with what will be required of students. Complete only Session 1 in this lesson; students will complete the remaining sessions in subsequent lessons.
  • Throughout this unit, students are introduced to habits of character for how we treat others, specifically showing respect. In Lessons 4–13, students learn the definition of respect and how it can be applied to their learning and work. Beginning in Lesson 4, students will reflect on how they and their classmates are showing respect during the Role-Play protocol.

In Advance

  • Prepare Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards for the words sunrise and horizon. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
  • During Work Time A, circulate and listen for students to use descriptive language as they talk about their tea party picture. (SL.2.2)
  • Preview the entire Close Read-aloud Guide to fully understand the “arc” of these five lessons and to see how the learning and skills build from one lesson to the next.
  • Pre-distribute materials for Closing at student workspaces to ensure a smooth transition.
  • During Work Time A, circulate and listen for students to use descriptive language as they talk about their tea party picture. (SL.2.2)
  • Review the Sun Movement routine as necessary (see Lesson 2).
  • Post: Learning target; “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky,” Part 4; “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song; and applicable anchor charts (see materials list). 

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Opening A: “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky,” Part 4 could be an email.
  • Opening A: Record the whole group singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song and post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to listen to at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time C: Video record students at they complete the Sun Movement routine to watch with students to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw  for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs with multiple opportunities to discuss and interpret the content from Summer Sun Risin’, using multiple language modalities.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to listen to Summer Sun Risin’ without stopping, especially if they do not understand some of the language used in the text. Encourage students to use the pictures to help them understand what is happening in the story. Tell them that if they do not understand everything right now, it is okay. Remind students that they will read everything again during the unit.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During Work Time A, allow students to grapple by pairing some students who need lighter support together in matching proficiency pairs.

For heavier support:

  • During Closing and Assessment, work closely with a small group of students who need heavier support. Consider completing the response sheet together as a shared writing experience.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students review the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. Some students may benefit from context-specific visual cues to remember the meaning of each bullet on the anchor chart. Consider printing and displaying photographs of students demonstrating each bullet to connect these terms to concrete shared experiences.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): Students have a range of fine motor abilities and writing needs. Some students may need additional support in order to visually plan for writing and drawing on their response sheets. Vary methods for fine motor responses, offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students revisit the Sun Movement routine. Some students may have difficulty estimating the amount of space they need in order to move their bodies safely during this routine. Consider minimizing threats and distractions by reminding all students to stand in pre-determined spots for movement.  

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • events, setting, diagram (L)
  • arisin’, sunrise, horizon (T)

Review:

  • noun, verb, character, observation, illustration, key details (L)

Materials

  • “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky,” Part 4 (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song (one to display)
  • Markers (two different colors; for teacher use)
  • During Work Time A, circulate and listen for students to use descriptive language as they talk about their tea party picture. (SL.2.2)
  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
    • Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 1; for teacher reference)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; two)
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to in Work Time B; see Teaching Notes)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ icons (new; one set for teacher use during the close read-aloud)
    • Sun icon (new; one for teacher use during the close read-aloud)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ word cards (new; for teacher use during the close read-aloud; one)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ anchor chart (new; co-created with students during Work Time A; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
    • Summer Sun Risin’ Culminating Task response sheet (one for teacher modeling and one per student; see Close Read-aloud Guide)
    • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Sun Movement chart (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet (one for teaching modeling and one per student)
  • Colored pencils (class set; variety of colors per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Reading “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky,” Part 4 and Introducing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” Song (10 minutes)

  • Gather students whole group. As needed, remind them to move safely and make space for everyone.
  • Remind students of the story “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky” and what they have learned about why Elvin loves the sun and moon. 
  • Share that today, they will hear the next part of the story.
  • Display “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky,” Part 4 and read it aloud slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • After you read the end of Part 4 and read the words “but the musician did not answer his questions. Instead he gave him this ...” direct students’ attention to the posted “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song.
  • Share that today, students will learn the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song.
  • Direct students’ attention to the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song. 
  • Tell students you are going to sing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song aloud line by line and as you do, you would like them to:
    • Echo each line of the song as it is sung, tracking the print
  • Sing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song, tracking the print with your finger or a pointer.
  • Tell students you would like them to think of some motions that go along with this song. Point out that this song uses nouns and their matching verbs and that these can help them think of some movements for the song.
  • Remind students that nouns are people, places, or things (like “the sun”!), and that verbs are action words (like “shines”!).
  • Model using markers to underline the noun “the sun” with one color and the verb “shines” with the other color.
  • Tell students that you are slowly going to repeat the song. When they hear or see a noun they can touch their head, and when they see or hear a verb they can touch their foot.
  • Sing the song aloud slowly and underline the nouns and verbs in their prospective colors.
  • After singing the song and underlining the nouns and verbs invite students to reread the phrases with you:
    • “The sun shines”
    • “I see”
    • “The moon lights”
    • “I see:
    • "Stars make”
    • “I see”
    • “I see”
    • “I look”
    • “I see”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What are some hand gestures, motions, or actions that could go along with these nouns and verbs in the song?” (Responses will vary, but may include: lifting their arms to form a circle; twinkling their fingers like stars; etc.)

  • If time permits, repeat the song inviting students to sing with their movements for each noun and verb.
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who are less comfortable singing next to students who may be more comfortable. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Before singing the “Sun, Moon, and Stars” song, reread the lyrics aloud and invite students to listen carefully for words that describe the sun and to give a silent signal when they hear one. Invite students to underline the words that they identify.
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who are less comfortable singing next to students who may be more comfortable. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Provide visuals for the nouns in the song (sun, moon, stars) and use these visuals when helping students to identify theses nouns. 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Close Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. Point to each bullet while reading aloud.
  • Remind students that readers do things to help them really understand the text well. (This is true even if they are hearing the text read aloud to them.) Explain that readers look closely at the illustrations to help them understand the details of the story and reread important parts of the text.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What does it look like to look closely at the illustrations?” (Look for students to mimic studying and looking deeply at imaginary pictures.)

“What does it look like to reread the text?” (Look for students to mimic rereading a pretend text.)

  • Refocus whole group and invite one or two students to share out.
  • Share with students that today, they will begin reading a new book called Summer Sun Risin’ and will get to practice the things close readers do as they answer the focus question: “What is the boy doing when the sun is rising, at its highest, and setting in the sky?”
  • To activate background knowledge, link each bullet on the anchor chart to printed photographs of students closely reading. (MMR)
  • During Work Time A, circulate and listen for students to use descriptive language as they talk about their tea party picture. (SL.2.2)
  • For ELLs: Some students may be confused about whether the prompt “What does it look like …” requires them to provide a verbal description or to act it out. Make clear that students can choose to show or tell to their partners. As an option, invite one partner to act out looking closely at the illustrations while the other describes his or her actions. (Example: “You are looking at your hands up close as if you are looking at every part of the picture.”)

B. Close Read-aloud, Session 1: Summer Sun Risin’, Pages 1–28 (30 minutes)

  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct their attention to the posted learning target and read it aloud:
  • “I can ask and answer questions about the boy and the sun in Summer Sun Risin’ using key details from the text.”
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from group:

“What are key details?” (important parts of the text that support the main idea)

  • Share that today, students will hear a story read aloud about a boy’s daily activities as the sun travels across the sky from sunrise to sunset. They should pay attention to key details about the main character and setting.
  • Remind students of the definition of character (person, animal, or object in a story, play, or movie)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What is the setting of a story?” (when and where a story takes place)

  • As students share out, confirm thinking and explain that the setting is when and where a story takes place.
  • Display Summer Sun Risin’.
  • Briefly review the definition of risin’ (rising) (to climb upwards).
  • Guide students through the close read-aloud for Summer Sun Risin’ using the Close Read-aloud Guide: Summer Sun Risin’ (Session 1; for teacher reference). Consider using the Reading Literature Checklist during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Session 1, refer to the guide for the use of:
    • Summer Sun Risin’ icons
    • Sun icon
    • Summer Sun Risin’ word cards
    • Summer Sun Risin' anchor chart
    • Summer Sun Risin’ Culminating Task response sheet
  • Refocus whole group. Give students specific, positive feedback on their close reading skills. (Example: “I saw you using the illustrations to think about where this story takes place.”)
  • Tell students that in the next lesson they will write and draw about the key details from the beginning of the text. 
  • When preparing students for the close read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Pair students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency in the pair can serve as a model during the read-aloud, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames.
  • For ELLs: During the read-aloud, provide sentence frames for Think-Pair-Shares. (Example: “The text is mostly about …”
  • For ELLs: During the read-aloud, display the text on a document camera or an enlarged copy of the text to help direct students to the appropriate sentences on each page.
  • For ELLs: Point out that take and place are words we hear a lot together. Example: “When you hear take place together, we are talking about where something happens.” Prompt students to practice using the phrase. Ask:

“Where does art class happen? Where does it take place?” (Art class takes place in the art room.)

C. Engaging the Learner: Sun Movement Routine (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to stand up and spread out inside and around the edge of the whole group meeting area. As needed, remind students to move safely and make space for everyone.
  • Remind them that in the previous lesson, they learned the Sun Movement routine as a way to say “hello” to the sun.
    • Invite students to review Steps 1–5 of the Sun Movement routine while referencing the Sun Movement chart. Tell the class that today, they will practice Steps 1–5.
    • Invite students to join you as you practice Steps 1–5, taking 10–15 seconds for each step.
    • Repeat once or twice as time permits.
    • Offer students specific, positive feedback on their work practicing the beginning movements in the routine. (Example: “I noticed that everyone took great care to make sure their bodies were safe as we practiced the beginning movements.”)
  • Tell students that throughout the unit they will continue to practice the Sun Movement routine.
  • Before asking students to complete the Sun Movement routine, ensure safety and minimize distractions by reminding students to find their pre-determined spots for movement. (Example: Use masking tape to mark a place on the floor for each student, ensuring that students will have enough space to move safely.)  (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Independent Writing: Summer Sun Risin’ Response Sheet, Part 1 (10 minutes)

  • Remind students of the work they did thinking about key details relating to the main character and setting in Summer Sun Risin’ during the close read-aloud.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“Who is the main character?” (the boy)

“Where does the story take place?” (a farm)

  • Display Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet. Point out that this material has two parts. Tell students that today they will complete only Part 1, by writing and drawing about the main character and setting using key details from the text.
    • Direct students to the top of the page and point to Part 1 and read the title aloud:
      • “Use words and pictures to answer these questions.”
    • Point to the table below the title and read the headings of each column aloud:
      • “Who are the main characters?”
      • “Where does the story take place?”
    • Tell students that today they will answer these two questions using pictures and words to show their thinking.
    • Invite students to show a thumbs-up or to touch their head if they are ready to begin writing and drawing about the main character and setting.
    • Point out the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheets already at their workspaces.
    • Transition students to their workspaces and invite them to begin working.
    • Circulate and support students as necessary. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts).
  • After 5 minutes, signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound. Model cleanup, keeping directions clear and brief. Collect their response sheets.
  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on their thinking regarding the characters and setting as it relates to the text they read during this lesson. (Example: “I saw that Elijah not only drew the boy and his mother and father under the section for characters, but he also stretched and spelled the word boy under his drawing.”)
  • Remind students that in the next few lessons they will begin to role-play events from the story and use thinking from this role-play to help with writing and drawing about the major events from the beginning, middle, and end of the story.
  • When preparing students for independent writing, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing. (MMAE)
  • Before the transition to clean up, support self-regulation and independence during the transition by providing a clear routine for what to do with unfinished work and using a visual timer. (MME)
  • For ELLs: While displaying the Summer Sun Risin’ response sheet, sketch a stick-figure icon next to the character heading and a landscape icon next to the setting heading. Model and think aloud completing it using a text familiar to all students, such as The Most Magnificent Thing. (Example: “Who is the main character from The Most Magnificent Thing? Oh, that’s right! It is the little girl! I will draw a picture of the little girl and write, ‘little girl.’”)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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