Focused Read Aloud and Retelling, Session 1: Sun and Moon | EL Education Curriculum

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ELA G1:M2:U1:L10

Focused Read Aloud and Retelling, Session 1: Sun and Moon

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.2: Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.2: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media.
  • L.1.6: Use words and phrases acquired through conversations, reading and being read to, and responding to texts, including using frequently occurring conjunctions to signal simple relationships (e.g., because).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can answer questions about key details from Sun and Moon. (RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.7, SL.1.1, SL.1.2)
  • I can describe the characters and setting from Sun and Moon. (RL.1.3, RL.1.7, W.1.8, L.1.6)

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the focused read-aloud in Work Time A, use the Reading Literature Checklist to track students’ progress toward RL.1.1, RL.1.2, RL.1.3, and RL.1.7 (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Time B, circulate and listen for students to use words and phrases acquired through the read-aloud during the Role-Play protocol. Note how students are interacting with one another using the Speaking and Listening Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Learner: Introducing the Moon Movement Routine (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Sun and Moon (20 minutes)

B. Role-Play: Character and Setting, Pages 1–11 (10 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Sun and Moon Response Sheet, Parts I and II (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Structured Discussion: Making Connections (5 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson follows the pattern of Lesson 8. It is the first of two lessons in which students engage in a focused read-aloud of Sun and Moon. Students use the text and illustrations to ask and answer questions about the characters, setting, events, and central message/lesson in the story.
  • This lesson introduces the Moon Movement routine, which is similar in purpose to the Sun Movement routine. The inclusion of movement gives young children time to prepare their bodies and minds for deeper understanding and focus. The rhythm and repetition of this stretch and similar activities brings consistency and comfort to the lesson opening.
  • The pages of Sun and Moon are not numbered. For instructional purposes, the page that begins with “‘Just for one day,’ begged the moon …” should be considered page 1 and all pages thereafter numbered accordingly.
  • If possible, provide students access to the text, Sun and Moon by Lindsey Yankey, during the K-2 Labs and K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 8–9, students created a Story Elements board for Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me. In this lesson, they begin a new Story Elements board for Sun and Moon.
  • In Lesson 8, students named the characters in response to a teacher-directed question. In this lesson, students are introduced to a signal to use when they hear or see a character. This practice promotes independence and moves students toward mastering the skill of identifying characters more fluidly while reading.
  • In this lesson, students continue to use the Role-Play protocol (begun in Lesson 4) with a focus on the characters and setting.
  • Students follow the same structure used in Lesson 8–9 for completing Parts I and II of the response sheet.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students may be shy or uncomfortable taking part in the Moon Movement routine. Invite students to join, but do not force students to do the stretches. Maintain a welcoming classroom environment.
  • Some students may need more support with their oral language during the role-play. Look for opportunities to support students’ oral language as they practice role-playing by providing sentence stems or mimed actions.
  • Support students in their transfer of oral rehearsal into writing before and during Work Time C by referring back to the Story Elements board.

Down the road:

  • The Story Elements board for Sun and Moon will be completed in Lesson 11. Then, for each following pair of lessons, the board is “wiped clean” to track story elements for a new text.
  • Throughout this unit, students repeatedly return to texts to ask and answer questions about the characters, setting, events, and central message of the story. In Lessons 14–15, students will complete the Unit 1 Assessment by completing all parts of the response sheet for the text Kitten’s First Full Moon.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards for crescent and earth. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
    • Story Elements board by clearing the icons used to track the character(s), setting, and events from Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me.
    • Parts I and II of the Sun and Moon response sheet on clipboards for Work Time C.
  • Review the Role-Play protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Moon Movement chart, and applicable anchor charts (see materials list).

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Create the Story Elements Board in an online format—for example, a Google Doc—to display and for families to access at home to reinforce these skills.
  • Video record students as they engage in the Moon Movement routine Steps 1–6 to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app such as Seesaw for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cellphones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards: 1.I.A.1, 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by providing opportunities to deepen comprehension and expand oral language by acting out events of the text Sun and Moon. Students will also have the opportunity to demonstrate understanding by writing in a structured organizer.
  • ELLs may focus more on the illustrations to make meaning of the text. Stop frequently to connect the illustrations. Express wonder and notice the detail, colors, and textures in the illustrations. Because students will be adding drawing to their response sheet, consider mentioning a quality that appears on the High-Quality Work anchor chart.

Levels of Support

For lighter support:

  • During the Role-Play protocol in Work Time B, invite students to play “director” as they support students who need heavier support. They can help arrange scenes and provide lines as they work with a pair of students.
  • The supports in this lesson and in Lesson 11 are similar to the supports in Lessons 8–9 because the tasks mirror one another. Based on student performance in Lessons 8–9, consider releasing students from some of the supports to foster independence and assess student progress.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, begin to complete Parts 1 and 2 of the Sun and Moon response sheets as a shared writing experience before prompting students to write independently.
  • During Work Time C, model doing quick sketches within the graphic organizer as placeholders for information. Say: “You can sketch first so that you don’t forget the information you want to add. Then you may go back later and write.”

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): In this lesson, students share ideas about Moon’s experiences and opinions in Sun and Moon. Some students may need additional support with understanding and remembering these ideas. Offer alternatives to auditory information by writing students’ ideas on chart paper and referring to them in future lessons.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, individual students are asked to share ideas about which character they would prefer to be in Sun and Moon with a partner. Some students may need additional support with sharing an opinion based on the characters in this story. As students share out, provide options for expression and communication by using prompts and sentence frames.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As students engage in the Role-Play protocol with a partner, foster community by discussing strategies with students for how to ask for help from their peers during the protocol.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

New:

  • crescent (L)

Review:

  • character, setting, moon, sun (L)

Materials

  • Moon Movement chart (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall cards (new; teacher-created; 1)
  • Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall (begun in Lesson 1; added to during the Opening and Work Time A)
  • Story Elements board (blank; added to during Work Time A)
  • Sun and Moon (one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Story Elements Board Icons: Sun and Moon (two; added to Story Elements board during Work Time A)
  • Story Elements Board: Sun and Moon (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Reading Literature Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Role-Play Protocol anchor chart (begun Lesson 4)
  • Speaking and Listening Checklist (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Module 1)
  • Sun and Moon response sheet (one per student)
  • Pencils (one per student)
  • Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Module 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Learner: Introducing the Moon Movement Routine (5 minutes)

  • Direct students to sit in a circle around the whole group meeting area.
  • Display the Moon Movement chart and share that this is a set of movements and stretches that the dancer in “Elvin, the Boy Who Loved the Sky” shared with Elvin.
  • Follow the same process used for the Sun Movement routine to lead students in Steps 1–6 of the Moon Movement routine, providing time for students to practice and try it out.
  • Repeat Steps 1–6 once more, going through the movements more smoothly and fluidly.
  • Name the side stretches as “crescent moon” shapes.
  • Show students the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card for crescent and follow the same routine established in the Lesson 1: Provide its definition, use it in a sentence with an accompanying gesture, and place the Word Wall card and picture for it on the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall.
  • Lead students through Steps 1–6 of the Moon Movement routine once more, moving smoothly and fluidly through the motions.
  • Provide differentiated mentors by seating students who are less comfortable singing next to students who may be more comfortable. (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Focused Read-aloud, Session 1: Sun and Moon (20 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read them aloud:
    • “I can answer questions about key details from Sun and Moon.”
    • “I can describe the characters and setting from Sun and Moon.”
  • Remind students that they will work toward meeting these learning targets during the focused read-aloud today.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Story Elements board and ask:

“According to the learning targets, which part of the Story Elements board will we be filling in today?” (character and setting)

  • Display Sun and Moon and tell students that today they will use a signal to show when they see or hear a character introduced in the story. Demonstrate the signal (thumbs-up, pat your head, touch your toes, etc.).
  • Tell students you are now going to begin reading the text aloud. As you do, they should use the chosen signal when they hear or see a character. Read pages 1–10 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Pause after reading page 10 and ask:

“Who are the characters in this story? How does the author describe (not physical descriptions) Sun and Moon?” (Sun and Moon are the characters. They are friends. Moon is bored with his place in the sky at night.)

  • Place the Story Elements Board Icons: Sun and Moon for Sun and Moon (the characters) on the Story Elements board. Refer to Story Elements Board: Sun and Moon (answers, for teacher reference) and track students’ progress towards with the Reading Literature Checklist as necessary.
  • Show students the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall card for earth.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“What is earth?” (the planet on which we live)

  • Invite students to use the word earth in a sentence. (Example: “We live on planet earth.”)
  • Place the Word Wall card for earth on the Sun, Moon, and Stars Word Wall.
  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read aloud page 11 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Pause after reading page 11 and invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“Look carefully at the illustration. Tell me what details you see that help you understand the setting.” (dark sky, people and animals down below, etc.)

  • Cold call on two to three students to share out details of what they see.
  • Tell students that from the details they shared from the illustration we can figure out the setting. Ask:

“When and where is this story taking place?” (at night in the sky above the earth)

  • Cold call on one to two students to share out.
  • Place the Story Elements board icon for the sky on the Story Elements board.
  • Draw students’ attention back to the text and read aloud pages 11–28 slowly, fluently, with expression, and without interruption.
  • Pause after reading page 28 and flip back between pages 11 and 29 to show the illustrations.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“Based on the illustrations for evidence, what did Moon see when he paid attention to the world during the night?” (beautiful things such as children dreaming, foxes, flowers blooming, fireworks, etc.)

  • Cold call on two to three students to share out.
  • Draw students’ attention back to the book and finish reading it aloud.
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:
  • “Why do you think Moon decided to remain in the night sky? What made him change his mind?” (He paid attention to all the beautiful things he sees at night.)
  • If productive, cue students to clarify the conversation by confirming what they mean:

“So, do you mean _____?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to whisper a response into their hands:

“What is something beautiful you would want to see during the night?” (Responses will vary.)

Tell students that in the next lesson they will complete the Story Elements Board: Sun and Moon to help retell events from Sun and Moon.

  • When preparing students for the focused read-aloud, provide options for physical action and sensory input by differentiating seating. Some students might benefit from sitting on a gym ball, a move-and-sit cushion, or a chair with a resistive elastic band wrapped around the legs. (MMAE)
  • As students share what they discussed with their partners about Moon’s experiences and opinions, offer alternatives to auditory information by writing students’ ideas on chart paper or a white board. Save their ideas to refer to in future lessons. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: Encourage active listening by assigning groups of students specific characters to listen for. Invite them to use a special signal when their character is introduced and subsequently mentioned. (Example: “Your group will be the moon group. Make a circle around your face with your hands whenever you hear about the moon.”)
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the meaning of the chunks from the text: “At night / with everyone asleep / his world / was often boring and lonely.” Write and display student responses next to the chunks. Examples:

“What does this sentence mean?” (Responses will vary.)

    • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “At night” and ask:

“What is the setting of this sentence? When does it take place?” (at night)

  • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “with everyone asleep” and ask:

“What happens at night? Who is everyone?” (people are sleeping; all the people)

    • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “his world” and ask:

“What character is this sentence about? Whose world? How do you know?” (The moon. The nighttime is the moon’s world. I know because the moon comes out at night; because the moon is in the picture.)

    • Point to and read aloud the chunk: “was often boring and lonely.” and ask:

“How would the moon describe the nighttime?” (boring and lonely.)

“How would you describe the character the moon? (bored and lonely)

“Pretend you are bored and lonely like the moon. Show your partner how your face looks when you are bored and alone.”

“Now what do you think this sentence means?” (The moon feels bored and lonely when all the people are asleep.)

“How did this sentence help you describe a character?” (It tells how the character feels when people are asleep.)

B. Role-Play: Character and Setting, Pages 1–11 (10 minutes)

  • Use the routine established in the first half of the module to review the first learning target with students and guide them through the Role-Play protocol for pages 1–11 of Sun and Moon.
  • Review the Role-Play Protocol anchor chart as necessary (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of this protocol.) and track their progress with the Speaking and Listening Checklist for SL.1.1 and SL.1.2.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on their ability to role-play the characters and setting of Sun and Moon. (Example: “Mikayla, you really showed Moon’s curiosity about the daytime as you showed the excitement with your facial expressions and body.”)
  • When giving directions for the Role-Play protocol, foster collaboration by guiding students in knowing when and how to ask a classmate for help. (Example: “When you are role-playing today, you might forget details about the character and setting in Sun and Moon. That is okay! First, try your best to look at the pages and remember what happened in the story. If you are still stuck, your partner can help you. What could you say to your partner if you forget something about the story?”)  (MME)

C. Independent Writing: Sun and Moon Response Sheet, Parts I and II (20 minutes)

  • Tell students that now they are going to write what they know about the characters and setting in Sun and Moon.
  • Direct students’ attention to the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart and quickly review it. Remind students that they should continue to use these habits as they write today.
  • Distribute prepared clipboards with Sun and Moon response sheet and pencils and follow the same routine established in Lesson 8 to complete Parts I and II.
  • Circulate to support students as they write. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Story Elements board, Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts). If students need additional support generating ideas, invite them to work in a small group with support and refer to the Story Elements board from Work Time A.
  • When 2 minutes remain, provide students with a time reminder and encourage them to finish up Part II. Signal all students to stop working through the use of a designated sound.
  • Collect students’ response sheets.
  • When preparing students for independent writing, vary methods for fine motor responses by offering modified response sheets with a separate box for drawing and lines for writing. (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Provide a visual and gesture for the four adjectives in the characteristics word bank: curious, bored, angry, confused. Make language transparent by telling students these are adjectives, words we use to describe people, places, or things.
  • For ELLs: Before inviting students to complete Part 2 of the Sun and Moon response sheet, model and think aloud choosing an adjective from the word bank and providing a reason. (Example: “Hmm … I think Moon is bored. So what should I write here? That’s right, ‘bored’! Why is he bored?”)
  • For ELLs: Students may benefit from orally rehearsing their writing with peers. After introducing the sentence frame “I think Moon was _________ because __________,” encourage students to tell a partner their full sentence aloud. Circulate to support this interaction.
  • For ELLs: Prepare students for the task by displaying and reviewing a student’s Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me response sheet completed in Lesson 8. Tell students they will now complete a similar activity, but this time they will think about the text Sun and Moon.

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Making Connections (5 minutes)

  • Invite students to form a circle in the whole group area.
  • With excitement, tell students that now that they have written about the characters Sun and Moon, they have a challenging decision to make: whether they want to be the Sun, and spend their time in the daylight, or the Moon, and spend their time in the night.
  • Display the Discussion Norms anchor chart and review the norms.
  • Invite students to whisper a response into their hands:

“What is one discussion norm you want to uphold while discussing today?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:
  • “Would you rather be the sun or the moon? Why?”
  • If productive, cue students to listen carefully and seek to understand:

“Who can tell us what your classmate said in your own words?” (Responses will vary.)

  • As students discuss, circulate and listen in. Take note of the ideas they are sharing and target a few students to share out with the whole group.
  • Refocus students whole group and call on a few students to share out.
  • Engage students in a whole group discussion regarding their responses.
  • Give students specific, positive feedback on following the discussion norms. (Example: “Samuel, I noticed you were looking at the speaker throughout our discussion. Mia, you raised your hand to add onto Fatima’s idea.”)
  • When circulating and Listening in during student discussions, scaffold partner conversations as needed. Some students may benefit from explicit prompting or a sentence frame. (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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