Discussing and Writing: Finishing a Magnificent Thing | EL Education CurriculumTEST2

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ELA G1:M1:U3:L7

Discussing and Writing: Finishing a Magnificent Thing

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • SL.1.1a: Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  • SL.1.1b: Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
  • SL.1.1c: Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can discuss and agree on the finishing touches for our group’s magnificent thing. (SL.1.1, SL.1.1a, SL.1.1b, SL.1.1c)
  • I can sketch and write about my group’s finished magnificent thing. (W.1.8)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to track students’ progress toward the lesson’s standards (SL.1.1a, SL.1.1b, and SL.1.1c) (see Assessment Overview and Resources).

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Pinky Partners: How Did Revision Go? (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Modeling: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (5 minutes)

B. Small Group Practice: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (15 minutes)

C. Modeling and Guided Writing: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (15 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards: 

  • This is the final lesson in which students work with their small groups to complete their classroom magnificent things, using their knowledge about tools and habits of character to do so.
  • This lesson focuses a considerable amount of time on writing. Students write about what they did on their magnificent thing in Work Time C and then write about a habit of character they used while working, in the Closing. Determine which task your class may need more time with and consider breaking up the writing with some small movement.
  • Students demonstrate mastery toward standards SL.1.1, SL.1.1a, SL.1.1b, and SL.1.1c. Use the Speaking and Listening Checklist to collect data on remaining students during the Think-Pair-Share and Pinky Partners protocols.
  • During the Opening, students revisit the module guiding question through the Pinky Partners protocol. Encourage students to reflect on all their learning about tools and habits of character to answer the question.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • Students use the writing in their Magnificent Thing notebook to help them decide what revisions they will make to their magnificent thing during Work Time B.
  • This lesson follows a similar pattern to Lessons 2, 3, 5, and 6 with modeling, small group work, and then guided writing.
  • During the Closing, students revisit all four habits of character they have been practicing: collaboration, initiative, responsibility, and perseverance.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 and 2 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • In Work Time B, students work in their small groups to finish their magnificent thing. Build social skills by guiding students through tricky collaboration situations when necessary. Help students come to closure with their project.
  • Consider previewing the group work with students who may need a bit more support with collaborating.
  • Student may need more than 15 minutes to process the final revisions of their magnificent thing. Adjust the timing of Work Time B based on your classroom needs.

Down the road:

  • The Closing serves as a formative assessment to check content understanding of habits of character. Students participate in a conversation about how they have used a habit of character while doing their work, and then write their answer on page 6 of the Magnificent Thing notebook. The notebook includes a blank page in order to rip out and collect the formative assessment so that students can continue to use their notebooks in Lessons 8–11. This lesson completes the first part of the performance task and sets a foundation for the written portion to be completed in upcoming lessons.
  • Students review the four habits of character they have learned and applied throughout this module. In Lesson 12, students will synthesize this into one Effective Learners anchor chart, which can remain posted in the classroom all year.

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to display the Magnificent Thing Notebook (one for teacher modeling) and other documents throughout the lesson.
  • Consider pre-determining and preparing a few students to model with you during Work Time A.
  • Consider placing Magnificent Thing notebooks in each group’s designated workspace for a smoother transition.
  • Set up a table with various materials and tools that students can easily access for Work Time B.
  • Review the Pinky Partners protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, Unit 3 guiding question, Pinky Partners anchor chart, "Learning Target" song, Collaboration anchor chart, Initiative anchor chart, Responsibility anchor chart, and Perseverance anchor chart

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. 

  • Work Time A: If you recorded students singing the "Learning Target" song in Unit 2, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time B: Video record students working together to determine revisions to watch with students to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement in collaboration. Post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software. 

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1, 1.I.B.5, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through the practice of collaborative work, and through opportunities to learn experientially.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to reflect on their work and on teacher modeling using precise language. Cold call on students who are not volunteering. Ask probing questions to draw out language. (Example: "Bryan, I saw you were frustrated waiting for the glue to dry. And then Laura saw that you were waiting and asked you to clean up the scraps. You were really working together! What habit of character were you using?")

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the Mini Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the learning target before asking the prepared questions. Example: "What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let’s see if we can answer them together."
  • Encourage students to use Conversation Cues with other students to promote productive and equitable conversation and to enhance language development.

For heavier support:

  • During Work Time C, work closely with students who have trouble writing to complete page 5 of their notebooks. Discuss with students what they intend to write, and scribe some or all of their thoughts with a highlighter so students can trace it afterward. If a group of students need heavier support, work with them to complete the task as a shared experience.
  • Review the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart both before Work Time and during Closing and Assessment. This will focus students’ thinking and frame the experience of finishing their magnificent things.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): At the end of this lesson, students are invited to reflect on the four habits of character anchor charts. Consider printing and displaying photographs of students demonstrating each habit of character (collaboration, initiative, responsibility, and perseverance) to connect these terms to concrete shared experiences.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time B, students will work with their small group to revise their magnificent things. Optimize access to technology by inviting a student from each group to be the "documenter," recording changes to the project by taking "before" and "after" pictures with a digital camera.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): As students add the final touches to their magnificent things, it may be difficult to stop working in order to transition and clean up. Using a visual timer in advance of the transition can support students with knowing what to expect and planning for cleaning up. 

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T); Vocabulary Used in Writing (W)

Review:

  • revise (L)

Materials

  • Module guiding question (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Pinky Partners anchor chart (begun in Unit 2, Lesson 2)
  • "Learning Target" song (from Unit 2, Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Magnificent Thing notebook (from Lesson 2; one for teacher modeling)
  • Magnificent Thing: Teacher Model (from Lesson 5; one to display)
  • Classwork display sign label (one for teacher modeling)
  • Magnificent things (begun in Lesson 4; one per group)
  • Magnificent Thing notebook (from Lesson 2; one per student) 
  • Various materials and tools for making a magnificent thing (from Lesson 4; for groups to create their magnificent thing in Work Time B)
  • Collaboration anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Initiative anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3)
  • Responsibility anchor chart (begun in Lesson 4)
  • Perseverance anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pinky Partners: How Did Revision Go? (10 minutes) 

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted module guiding question and read it aloud:
    • What will we need to make magnificent things?"
  • Tell students they are going to talk about their work from the previous lesson, using the Pinky Partners protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lesson 1 and review as necessary, using the Pinky Partners anchor chart. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“What does it mean to revise something?” (to change it or make it different)

  • Invite students to begin the protocol, using the following questions for each round:

“What was hard or tricky about revising your magnificent thing?” (Example: Ours kept falling apart.)

“What did you do to help your group through the tricky parts of revising your project?” (Example: We took a break to think of things that could help it stay together.)

“How did you feel when you were making changes to the project?” (Example: Mad when it kept falling apart.)

“How did you use perseverance to help you revise your project?” (Example: We remembered how the girl in The Most Magnificent Thing took a break, so we did too. Then we tried again.)

“What did you need to make a magnificent thing?” (Example: We needed a perseverance and stapler.)

  • Ask students to shake hands with their last partner and return to their seats in the whole group area.
  • For ELLs: Pair students with a partner who has more advanced or native language proficiency. The partner with greater language proficiency can serve as a model in the pair, initiating discussions and providing implicit sentence frames.
  • Before students begin the protocol, create an accepting and supportive classroom climate by asking students to brainstorm strategies for finding a new partner. (Example: "When it’s time to change partners, I might be worried about partnering with someone new. What are some things I can do or say to help me find a new partner?") (MME)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Modeling: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (5 minutes) 

  • Invite student to sing the "Learning Target" song.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can discuss and agree on the finishing touches for our group’s magnificent thing.”
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner:

“In your own words, what will you be doing today? (finishing our magnificent thing)

  • Using a document camera, display page 4 of the Magnificent Thing notebook (for teacher modeling). Tell students you are going to finish the work needed to complete the classwork display sign.
    • Invite pre-selected students to help you demonstrate.
    • While still displaying page 4 of the Magnificent Thing notebook (for teacher modeling), read the sentence(s) at the bottom that describe the revisions to your magnificent thing.
    • Talk to the student volunteers about the best way to complete the work listed on the bottom of page 4.
    • Say: "Someone still needs to make a label for our project. You do that while I get some more string."
    • Using the Magnificent Thing: Teacher Model, work with the student volunteers to complete the revisions to finish the student work sign.
    • Attach the classwork display sign label to showcase the project.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“What did you see or hear my group doing while we finished our magnificent thing?”(planning what work each person should do)

  • Tell students that now they will do something similar with their small groups. They will review their notes about what revisions they want to make to their magnificent thing and then they will finish the revisions. 
  • For ELLs: Mini Language Dive. Ask students about the learning target: I can discuss and agree on the finishing touches for our group’s magnificent thing. Examples:
    • "What is another word that means discuss? (talk, speak, and listen)
    • Point out that agree on are words we hear a lot together. Example: "Remember, when we agree on something, it means we all think the same idea is right." Prompt students to practice using the phrase agree on. Ask:
    • "I think my classwork display sign looks much better than it did when I started it. Can we all agree on that?" (Yes, we can agree on that; No, we cannot agree on that.) "Let’s discuss. Why or why not?"
    • Point to the phrase finishing touches. Say: "This is a tricky phrase because it does not mean we are touching it. In this case, it means I only change it a little bit. It’s like touching with one tiny finger." Invite students to pretend to touch something lightly with one finger.
    • "If we are doing finishing touches today, do you think we are changing our magnificent thing a lot or a little?" (a little)
    • "Can you put the learning target in your own words?" (Responses will vary.) 

B. Small Group Practice: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (15 minutes) 

  • Invite students to return to their small group workspace from the previous lesson.
  • Distribute students’ magnificent things and Magnificent Thing notebooks.
  • Remind each group to start their work time by turning to page 4 in their notebooks and rereading their notes. 
  • Then encourage students to work together to finish their group’s agreed-upon revisions from Lesson 6.
  • Circulate to support groups with collaborating. If necessary, refer students to the space with various materials and tools for making a magnificent thing.
  • Tell students when they have 2 minutes left to finish their work for today.
  • Refocus whole group.
  • Provide directions for cleanup and where to store their magnificent thing.
  • Invite students to clean up, store their magnificent things, and transition back to the whole group area, bringing their Magnificent Thing notebooks with them.
  • For ELLs: Some students may not remember or be able to read their prior notes. While circulating, assist students in rereading notes and refreshing their memories.
  • As small groups work to revise their project, optimize access to technology by inviting a student from each group to be the "documenter." This student can record changes to the project by taking "before" and "after" pictures with a digital camera. (MMAE)
  • When you give students the 2-minute warning before cleanup, provide support for self-regulation during a transition by using a visual timer. (MME)

C. Modeling and Guided Writing: Finishing a Magnificent Thing (15 minutes) 

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Invite them to hold their notebooks in their lap or sit on them.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can sketch and write about my group’s finished magnificent thing.”
  • Using the document camera, display page 5 of the Magnificent Thing notebook (for teacher modeling).
  • Read the first sentence stem aloud: "My magnificent thing is a ____."
  • Think aloud while writing "classwork display sign."
  • Continue modeling how to write about your magnificent thing:
    • Read the next sentence stem aloud: "I finished my magnificent thing by _____."
    • Think aloud about the work done to complete the classwork display sign in Work Time A.
    • Write two or three sentences about finishing the classwork display sign. (pasting new letters onto the sign; making the string longer)
    • Point out the box at the bottom of page 5.
    • Sketch a picture of the final product.
  • Using a total participation response, invite responses from the group:

“What types of things did I write about in my notebook?” (the materials you changed; things you fixed)

  • Invite students to whisper into their hands what work they did on their group’s magnificent thing.
  • Transition students back to tables with their Magnificent Thing notebooks.
  • Guide students through completing page 5 by rereading each sentence stem aloud and allowing time for students to write an answer.
  • Refocus whole group. 
  • For ELLs: Check for comprehension by cold calling a student and asking about what has been demonstrated. Example: "What did I just sketch?" (your magnificent thing) Evaluate whether or not students understand the process and reteach accordingly.
  • As you model writing about your magnificent thing in the notebook, emphasize process and effort by modeling how to sound out a word with tricky spelling. Encourage students to try their best and use environmental print if they get stuck. (MME)
  • To help students organize their ideas in the independent writing task, encourage students to use a finger or two to remember spacing between words on their page. (MMAE)
  • After 5 minutes of independent writing, facilitate personal coping skills by asking students to join you in a stretch break. Invite students to stand up and stretch their hands and fingers before sitting back down to complete the writing task. (MME) 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (15 minutes)

  • Direct students’ attention to the four habits of character anchor charts: Collaboration, Initiative, Responsibility, and Perseverance anchor charts.
  • Remind students that they helped to create these charts by thinking about how the habits of character helped them make their magnificent thing.
  • Invite students to reread one or two ideas on each poster to remember what was said.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to an elbow partner:

“Why was it important to use habits of character?” (Example: Habits of character help you work together.)

“What habit of character did you use while building your magnificent thing, and how did you use it?” (We used perseverance. Our homework box wouldn’t have stayed together if we hadn’t persevered.)

  • Ask students to open their Magnificent Thing notebooks to the last page.
  • Read the prompt aloud and provide time for students to write independently: "Describe how you used a habit of character to make the magnificent thing."
  • Invite students to turn and talk about their answers with an elbow partner as you collect their notebooks.
  • Give students specific positive praise on all of their work completing their magnificent thing. Tell them they will get to write more about their work in the next lesson. 
  • For ELLs: Allow beginning proficiency students to sketch a picture of themselves finishing their magnificent things. Ask them to choose a habit of character that they used, or assign them one. Guide them to label their sketch with the chosen habit of character.
  • On the Collaboration, Initiative, Responsibility, and Perseverance anchor charts, connect habits of character to concrete experiences by printing and displaying photographs of students demonstrating collaboration, initiative, responsibility, and perseverance in their small group work. (MMR)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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