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ELA G1:M1:U2:L4

Close Read-Aloud, Session 3: The Most Magnificent Thing

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.8: With guidance and support from adults, recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can look closely at the illustrations and text to describe how the girl tries to build her magnificent thing. (RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.7)
  • I can listen and respond to my classmates' ideas. (SL.1.1)
  • I can explain what I did to complete a challenge. (W.1.8

Ongoing Assessment

  • During Close Read-aloud Session 3 in Work Time A, use the RL Formative Assessment Sheet to track students' progress toward the RL standards listed for this lesson (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Work Times A and B, circulate and observe students following the classroom discussion norms. Prompt students as needed.
  • During Work Time C, observe students drawing and writing. Collect their writing at the end of the lesson and to determine areas students may need support with informational writing tasks in up coming lessons. Note: Informational Writing is formally assessed in Unit 3.
  • During the Closing, as students engage in the Pinky Partners protocol, monitor them as they listen and respond to a classmate's idea. Prompt students to attend to the classroom discussion norms, and provide question and sentence stems if necessary.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Engaging the Reader: Reviewing the Close Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Close Read-aloud Session 3: The Most Magnificent Thing, Pages 7–14 (20 minutes)

B. Developing Language: Name Juggle Challenge (10 minutes)

C. Independent Writing: Reflecting on the Challenge (15 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Pinky Partners: How Did You Complete the Challenge? (10 minutes)

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson is the third in a series of five lessons in which students engage in a close read-aloud of The Most Magnificent Thing. Students use the text and illustrations to ask and answer questions about the character and events in the story. They also continue to practice and attend to the classroom discussion norms (RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.7, SL.1.1).
  • During the close read, students have the option of participating in a supplemental Language Dive conversation that guides them through the meaning of a sentence from The Most Magnificent Thing. The conversation invites students to unpack complex syntax—or "academic phrases"—as a necessary component of building both literacy and habits of character. Students then apply their understanding of the meaning of this sentence when making their own magnificent thing in Unit 3. A consistent Language Dive routine is critical in helping all students learn how to decipher complex sentences and write their own. In addition, Language Dive conversations hasten overall English language development for ELLs.
  • This lesson gives students an opportunity to experience another challenge, this time emphasizing the habit of character of perseverance. Students will have read about how the character in The Most Magnificent Thing shows perseverance to do her work, and the Name Juggle Challenge will deepen students' understanding of this habit of character. As in Lesson 3, they will have the opportunity to reflect on their learning by responding to an independent writing prompt following the challenge (W.1.8).
  • To allow for a volume of reading on the topic of tools and work for this module, see the Recommended Texts and Other Resources document for this unit. Ensure that a variety of informational and narrative texts below, on, and above grade level for this topic are available during independent reading in the K-2 Reading Foundations Skills Block.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This lesson builds upon the habits of character defined in Lesson 1.
  • In Lesson 2, students listened to the entire text of The Most Magnificent Thing read aloud. Now, in Session 3 of this close read-aloud, students closely study pages 7–14 of the text. Continue to reinforce the value of revisiting this rich and complex text many times, to think about the important ideas and enjoy the beautiful language.
  • Revisiting the text will also reinforce practices from the Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart. At the end of the session, point out two new strategies that students used: listening carefully to the words, and answering questions about the words and pictures.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Look for opportunities to support students as they practice building on one another's ideas. Support them with sentence stems and probing questions.

Down the road:

  • Throughout this unit, students return to the habits of character defined in Lesson 1. In Lessons 3–6, students study these habits of character within the close read-alouds. Lessons 7–10 build upon this understanding, and students study the same habits of character in a series of focused read-alouds of The Little Red Pen.

In Advance

  • Prepare Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (see supporting materials).
  • Prepare Tools and Work Word Wall cards for the word perseverance. Write or type the word on a card and create or find a visual to accompany each word.
  • Set up a document camera to read The Most Magnificent Thing and to show other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Determine groups for the Name Juggle Challenge.
  • Distribute Name Juggle Challenge recording forms at student tables.
  • Review:
    • Close Reading Guide: The Most Magnificent Thing (Session 3).
    • Think-Pair-Share protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Guiding Question anchor chart, learning targets, Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, and Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart for easy viewing and access.
  • Character Definitions anchor chart for easy viewing and access.
  • Review the Close Reading Guide: The Most Magnificent Thing (Lesson 2 supporting materials), focusing specifically on Session 3.
  • Prepare the sentence strip chunks for use during the close read-aloud (see supporting materials).
  • Create Tools and Work Word Wall Word Cards for display. Write each word on an index card and, where appropriate, draw a corresponding image to support students understanding of the word.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive white board or document camera to display lesson materials.

  • Work Time B: Name Juggle Challenge Note could be an email.
  • Work Time B: Video record students participating in the challenge to watch with students to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post it on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time C: If recorded in Work Time B, playback the recording before independent writing to help students remember what they did and to see from a different perspective.
  • Closing and Assessment A: Video record students sharing with a partner to watch with students to evaluate strengths and areas for improvement. Post good examples on a teacher webpage or on a portfolio app like Seesaw for students to watch at home with families. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software. 

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1, 1.I.A.3, 1.I.B.5, 1.I.B.6, and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through movement and close examination of language.
  • ELLs may find it challenging to comprehend abstract concepts such as perseverance. Provide some additional practice with using the habits of character words. (For example, ask students: "How did you persevere during the last activity?" and provide a sentence frame: "I persevered when I ____."
  • ELLs are invited to participate in the first of a pair of two connected Language Dive conversations in Work Time A (optional). This conversation guides them through the meaning, function, and use of complex sentences from The Most Magnificent Thing. Students unpack complex syntax—or "academic phrases"—as a necessary component of building both literacy and habits of mind. A consistent Language Dive routine is critical in helping all students learn how to decipher complex sentences and write their own. In addition, Language Dive conversations hasten overall English language development for ELLs. Preview the Language Dive Guide and consider how to invite conversation among students to address the questions and goals suggested under each sentence strip chunk (see supporting materials). Select from the questions and goals provided to best meet your students' needs. Consider providing students with a Language Dive log inside a folder to track Language Dive sentences and structures and collate Language Dive note-catchers.

Levels of support

For lighter support:

  • During the Language Dive, challenge students to generate questions about the sentence before asking the prepared questions. Example: "What questions can we ask about this sentence? Let's see if we can answer them together."

For heavier support:

  • Reflection may be challenging for ELLs, who may struggle with metacognitive language skills in English. Clarify the meaning and purpose of reflection with a brief discussion. (Example: "Reflection is when I think back about what I did and how I did it. I always reflect after I teach a lesson. I think, 'Hmmm, was the way that I explained that tricky word clear?' It's important to reflect so you can learn to improve.")
  • In this lesson, making connections between the text, the challenge, and the habits of character may be abstract. Take additional opportunities to review the anchor charts, especially the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart along with the corresponding behaviors.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): This lesson continues to help students make connections between habits of character and The Most Magnificent Thing. As you prepare the Tools and Work Word Wall cards, clarify vocabulary (e.g., perseverance) by including a small photo or illustration on the word card. If possible, use a scanned illustration from The Most Magnificent Thing to help students make connections between the book and their own behaviors.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): This lesson includes time for students to write and draw about what they did during the Name Juggle Challenge. To help students express their ideas, offer options for drawing utensils (e.g., thick markers or colored pencils), writing tools (e.g., fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards), and scaffolds (e.g., dictation, sentence starters, writing prompts).
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): In this lesson, students are asked to complete a Name Juggle Challenge. This task will require students to simultaneously integrate gross motor and auditory memory skills simultaneously (and in front of their peers). Create a supportive classroom climate by discussing what to do if someone makes a mistake.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

  • perseverance (L)
  • examines, fiddles, shocked, smooths, studies, wrenches (T) 

Materials

  • Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to during Opening A; see supporting materials)
  • Close Read-aloud Guide: The Most Magnificent Thing (from Lesson 2; Session 3; for teacher reference)
    • The Most Magnificent Thing (book; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
    • RL Formative Assessment Sheet (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
    • The Most Magnificent Thing anchor chart (begun in Lesson 3; added to during Work Time A; see supporting materials)
    • Language Dive Guide I: The Most Magnificent Thing (optional, for ELLs; for teacher reference; see supporting materials)
    • Sentence strip chunks I: The Most Magnificent Thing (for ELLs; see supporting materials)
  • Mission Envelope #3 (from Lesson 1; one to display) 
    • Name Juggle Challenge Note (one to display)
    • Name Juggle Challenge ball, timer (one each for the class)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • Name Juggle Challenge recording form (one per student and one to display)
  • Pinky Partners anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Unit 1)
  • "How Were You Able to Complete the Name Juggle Challenge?" chart (new, co-created with students during Closing and Assessment A; see supporting materials)
  • Tools and Work Word Wall card (teacher-created; one)
  • Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart (begun in Lesson 1)
  • Tools and Work Word Wall (from Unit 1)

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Engaging the Reader: Reviewing the Close Readers Do These Things Anchor Chart (5 minutes)  

  • Gather students together whole group and invite them to sit with a partner. Designate partners as "A" or "B."
  • Direct students' attention to the posted Close Readers Do These Things anchor chart.
  • Remind students that there are some things that readers do to help them really understand the text well (this is true even if they are hearing the text read aloud to them): They reread the text and look closely at the illustrations to help them understand the details of the story.
  • Invite students to Think-Pair-Share and act out responses to the following questions:

“What does it look like to reread the text?” (Students should mimic rereading a pretend text.)

“What does it look like to look closely at the illustrations?” (Students should mimic studying and looking deeply at imaginary pictures.)

  • Share with students that they will be rereading a different section of The Most Magnificent Thing, and they will get to practice the things close readers do as they answer the focusing question: "How was the little girl able to make such a magnificent thing?"
  • Designating partner roles provides a structure for students to discuss and share their thinking.
  • To help students anticipate and prepare for sharing their thinking with a partner, provide all students with index cards that designate whether they are partner A or B (numbers or colors could also be used). (MME) 

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Close Read-aloud Session 3: The Most Magnificent Thing, Pages 7–14 (20 minutes)

  • Guide students through the close read-aloud of The Most Magnificent Thing using the Close Read-aloud Guide: The Most Magnificent Thing (Session 3; for teacher reference). Consider using the RL Formative Assessment Sheet during the close read-aloud (see Assessment Overview and Resources).
  • During Session 3, refer to the guide for the use of The Most Magnificent Thing anchor chart, and the supporting materials for the Language Dive Guide: Part I and sentence strip chunks.
  • For ELLs: As you read pages 7–14, provide students perceptual access to the text and illustrations by increasing their size with a document camera/ebook and projector. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As students share a time they persevered, circulate among students and listen. To support individual students to generate ideas, ask additional questions to focus thinking (examples: "Let's think about something you have had to try many times to learn. What about ...pumping on the swings, tying shoes, writing your name?"). To help students feel comfortable admitting they have to work hard to learn something, it may help to contextualize this conversation by talking about something they worked hard to learn when they were younger (i.e., in preschool or kindergarten). (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: Invite parents or friends who speak the students' home language to help translate and write each of the habits of character. Display translations of the anchor chart and practice pronouncing them with the whole class.
  • For ELLs: At the end of Close Read-aloud Session 3, lead students through a Language Dive. Note: Readers will need to skip ahead to page 15 of The Most Magnificent Thing for this activity. Refer to Language Dive Guide I: The Most Magnificent Thing (for teacher reference). Display the sentence strip chunks.

B. Developing Language: Name Juggle Challenge (10 minutes) 

  • Remind students of Mission Envelope #3 from Lesson 1. Tell them that you noticed the envelope has another note in it.
  • With excitement, reveal the Name Juggle Challenge Note and display it using a document camera.
  • Read aloud the Name Juggle Challenge Note to students: "Your challenge is to pass the ball to your classmates, remember the order, and do it as quickly as you can. The tricky part is to remember whom you passed the ball to every time. Good luck!"
  • Arrange the group into a circle.
  • Post and review the following directions. Answer clarifying questions:

1. One person starts off holding a Name Juggle Challenge ball.

2. This person says the name of the person he or she is rolling the ball to, and then rolls the ball to that person in the circle.

3. When that person gets the ball, he or she thanks the person (by name) who tossed the ball.

4. Then, he/she states a new name and rolls the ball to the new person.

5. Repeat this process until each person in the circle has received the ball.

6. The last person to get the ball rolls it back to the person who tossed it first.

  • Complete the challenge a few more times, repeating the same order every time. Challenge students to complete the round faster each time.
  • After each round, stop to give students an opportunity to name ways they can improve in the next round. For example:
    • Make eye contact with the person to whom they are rolling the ball.
    • Roll the ball gently.
    • Keep your hands out when you are getting the ball.
    • Focus on hearing your name only.
  • Once the challenge is over, invite the group members to shake hands with one another.
  • For ELLs: As you review the directions for the Name Juggle Challenge, promote understanding and provide differentiated models by inviting a few students to model the challenge in the center of the circle using the Fishbowl protocol. As the small group of students demonstrates the Name Juggle Challenge, invite students in the outer circle to observe and assess how students work together during this activity. (MMR, MMAE)
  • Before you begin the Name Juggle Challenge, create a supportive classroom climate by discussing what to do if a student forgets someone's name. (Example: "During this challenge you have to think about watching the ball, remembering the order, listening for your name, and remembering students' names. That's a lot to do at once! If you forget someone's name, it's okay. You can whisper, 'Remind me of your name?' and your classmate will help you remember.") (MME)

C. Independent Writing: Reflecting on the Challenge (15 minutes) 

  • Transition students back to their tables.
  • Tell students that just like they did in the previous lesson, when they wrote about how they completed the Jump Rope Challenge, now they will have an opportunity to reflect on how they completed the Name Juggle Challenge.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets, and read the third one aloud:
    • “I can explain what I did to complete a challenge.”
  • Display the Name Juggle Challenge recording form and read the prompt aloud: "How were you able to complete the challenge?"
  • Briefly model by sketching and writing a response on the recording form.
  • Tell students that before they write, they will Think-Pair-Share their ideas with an elbow partner. Remind students that they have used this mode for sharing in previous lessons. Give them 30 seconds to think about what they will share.
  • Invite students to pair with their elbow partner and begin sharing.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Direct students to the Name Juggle Challenge recording forms in the center of their table. Remind students that it may be helpful to them as writers to first draw and then write.
  • Invite students to begin sketching and writing.
  • Circulate and support students as necessary. Encourage them to use classroom resources (Word Walls, high-frequency word lists, and alphabet or letter sound combination charts).
  • To vary methods for fine motor response, offer options for drawing utensils (examples: thick markers or colored pencils) and writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). (MMAE)
  • To help students express ideas in their writing, offer sentence starters. Example: "We completed the challenge by ______." (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Allow beginning proficiency students to work with a partner of a higher proficiency level. If partners speak the same home languages, invite beginning proficiency students to dictate their ideas in their home languages. Their partners can help them translate in English.
  • For ELLs: If students have trouble generating ideas, consider steering them toward ideas that directly illustrate the meaning of perseverance. Examples: "I kept trying," "I didn't give up," "I tried again and again."

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Pinky Partners: How Did You Complete the Challenge? (10 minutes) 

  • Ask students to bring their Name Juggle Challenge recording forms to the whole group meeting area and sit with a partner.
  • Tell students that now they are going to share their drawing and writing with another student by using the Pinky Partners protocol. Remind students that they used this protocol in Lesson 2. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Refer students to the Pinky Partners anchor chart and Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart as necessary.
  • Begin the protocol.
  • Prompt students with questions such as:

“What made this challenge hard?”

“What did you do to complete this challenge better each time?”

  • Re-gather students to the whole group meeting area and offer specific, positive feedback on sharing their writing with a new partner. Also offer positive and specific feedback on how students attended to the discussion norms.
  • Invite a few students to share whole group. As they share, capture their ideas on the How Were You Able to Complete the Name Juggle Challenge? chart.
  • Using a total participation technique, invite responses from the group:

“How do behaviors that you used remind you of a habit of character the girl used to make her magnificent thing?” (perseverance)

  • Show students the Tools and Work Word Wall card for perseverance. Say the word and show the card. 
  • Invite students to turn and talk with an elbow partner. Refer to the Working to Become Effective Learners anchor chart as necessary:

“What is perseverance?” (When something is hard, I keep trying. I challenge myself.I keep trying and ask for help if I need it.)

  • Encourage students to use the word in a sentence to a partner. Have students repeat after you: "I used perseverance when I _______."
  • Place the Word Wall card for perseverance on the Tools and Work Word Wall.
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

“So, how do habits of character help us do work?” (Perseverance helps us keep going when the work is difficult.)

  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Offer students specific, positive feedback on using a habit of character to complete the challenge. Tell them that in the next lesson they will continue to closely read The Most Magnificent Thing and learn more about habits of character.
  • The Pinky Partners protocol is still new, and you may need to activate students͛ background knowledge regarding what this protocol looks and sounds like. Invite a few student volunteers to help you model the protocol. As you do so, remind students of the strategies they generated for how to deal with potential frustration or confusion. Examples:
    • "What can I do if the friend I wanted to talk to already has a partner?"
    • "What should I do if I don't have a partner?"
    • "How will I know if someone else doesn't have a partner?" (MMR, MME)
  • As you prepare the Tools and Work Word Wall card, clarify vocabulary (e.g., perseverance) by including a small photo or illustration on the card. Consider using a scanned illustration from The Most Magnificent Thing to help students make connections between the book and their own behaviors. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: As students interact, notice instances in which students make verb tense errors. Identify the error and recast the sentence correctly. Invite students to repeat. (Example: "I heard you say, 'I persevered when I try again.' You meant 'I persevered when I tried again.' Now you say it.")

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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