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ELA G1:M1:U2:L10

Unit 2 Assessment: Focused Read-aloud Session 4 and Writing About Habits of Character

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RL.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RL.1.3: Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.
  • RL.1.4: Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the senses.
  • RL.1.7: Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  • W.1.2: Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure.

Daily Learning Target

  • I can identify a character's feelings using evidence from the illustrations and the text. (RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.4, RL.1.7)
  • I can describe an event by looking closely at the illustrations. (RL.1.1, RL.1.7, W.1.2)

Ongoing Assessment

  • Use the Reading Literature Checklist Unit 2 Assessment RL.1.1/RL.1.3 Checklist to track students' progress toward RL.1.1, RL.1.3, and RL.1.7 both standards (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1).
  • During Work Time B, students discuss a text-based question. Prompt students still struggling with speaking and listening behaviors to refer to the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart displayed in the room.
  • Work Time B requires students to independently answer a question using evidence from the text. Support students by offering picture support and rereading the questions. To make sure you are assessing thinking rather than writing, allow students to talk through their answers with you before writing, if they are stuck.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Noticing and Wondering: The Little Red Pen, Pages 29–36 (10 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Focused Read-aloud: The Little Red Pen, Pages 37–46 (20 minutes)

B. Unit 2 Assessment, Part II: Independent Writing: "What Work Does Collaboration Help the Characters Do?" (20 minutes)

3. Closing and Assessment

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes) 

Purpose of lesson and alignment to standards:

  • This lesson is the final opportunity to assess students on their progress toward RL.1.1, and RL.1.3, and RL. 1.7. using the Reading Literature Unit 2 RL.1.1/RL.1.3 Assessment Checklist.
  • During this lesson, the book culminates with the characters rescuing the Little Red Pen from The Pit and collaborating to complete the word of grading the papers. Students practice finding words that show a feeling during the focused read-aloud, but are asked to demonstrate their skills independently in the unit assessment.
  • Note that although students write to demonstrate their understanding of the text in Work Time B, this Unit 2 assessment is not an assessment of W.1.2. This assessment provides baseline data about students' writing knowledge. The writing process will be formally taught and assessed in Unit 3.
  • Although this is a formal assessment of RL.1.1, RL.1.3, RL.1.4, and RL.1.7, students should experience the lesson as routine. Do not overemphasize the assessment; instead, use this as an opportunity to continue to gather meaningful data.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • In Lessons 1–6, students learned about habits of character. Similar to Lessons 7–9, in this lesson, students use that knowledge to identify habits of character in The Little Red Pen, focused on pages 37–46, in which the story is resolved. Focus students͛ attention on how the characters use collaboration to solve their problem and save Little Red Pen.
  • In Lesson 8, the students and teacher participated in a shared writing experience to write a response to their reading. In Lesson 9, students completed a similar writing exercise, but did sowith more independence. They will complete another, similar independent writing exercise in this lesson for the unit assessment.
  • This lesson continues providing opportunities for students to use their speaking and listening behaviors while discussing habits of character in the book.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Assessment guidance:

  • Refer to the Assessment Overview and Resources for all supporting materials for this lesson.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.
  • In Work Time B, students write independently. Support them through the writing process by talking them through their answers before they begin writing, repeating the question, or referring them to resources around the room to help with the writing process.

Down the road:

  • This lesson wraps up students' learning around the habits of character of effective learners and how they are needed to get work done. In Unit 3, students will apply their knowledge of tools from Unit 1 and their knowledge of habits of character from Unit 2 by doing their own work to create a magnificent thing for the classroom. Students will continue to study habits of character in different ways in future modules. 

In Advance

  • Set up a document camera to read The Little Red Pen and to show other documents throughout the lesson (optional).
  • Consider placing sticky notes throughout The Little Red Pen to mark stopping points for questions.
  • Prepare:
    • Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheet
    • Materials for students to work on the floor to complete their Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheets during Work Time A (i.e., pencils, clipboards, papers, etc.)  
    • Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheet.
  • Pre-determine partnerships for Work Time A.
  • Review the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Post: Learning targets, "Learning Target" song, and Words that Show Feelings anchor chart, Technology and Multimedia Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. 

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. 

  • Work Time A: If you recorded students singing the "Learning Target" song in Lesson 2, play this recording for them to join in with.
  • Work Time C: Students complete The Little Red Pen Perseverance: Student Response Sheet using word processing software, for example a Google Doc.
  • Closing and Assessment A: If you recorded students participating in the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol in Lesson 7, play this video for them to remind them of what to do.

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.B.6–8 and 1.I.C.10

Important points in the lesson itself

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs through providing opportunities to recall their learning before completing their assessments.
  • The Unit 2 Assessment may be a big leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction for some ELLs. Before they begin, encourage students to do their best and congratulate them on the progress they've made learning in English. (Example: "You have learned so much about habits of character! You can already write about it!")
  • Make sure that ELLs understand the assessment directions. Answer their questions, refraining from supplying answers to the assessment questions themselves. See additional support in the lesson.
  • After the assessment, ask students to discuss what was easiest and what was most difficult on the assessment, and why. In future lessons, focus on the language skills that will help students address these assessment challenges.

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): During Closing and Assessment, students are asked to share responses about how habits of character help people do work. If individuals or pairs of students do not make the connection, clarify this big idea by saying, "Habits of character help people when work is difficult. They help get the job done."
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): During Work Time B, vary methods for fine motor response by offering options for writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards).
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): During Work Time B, students may feel anxious about the assessment. Emphasize process and effort as alternatives to external evaluation and competition.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • evidence, identify (L)
  • beamed, clapped, shrieked (T)

Review:

  • describe

Materials

  • The Little Red Pen (book; one to display; for teacher read-aloud)
  • Document camera (optional)
  • "Learning Target" song (from Lesson 2; one to display)
  • Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheet (one per pair)
  • Session 4, Feeling Words: Sample Student Response Sheet (answers, for teacher reference)
  • Materials for response sheets (various; see Teaching Notes)
  • Words That Show Feelings anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7; added to in Work Time A; see supporting materials)
  • Reading LiteratureUnit 2 Assessment RL.1.1/RL.1.3 Checklist (see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheet (one per student and one to display, see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1) 
  • Unit 2 Assessment: Sample Student Response Sheet (answers, for teacher reference, see Assessment Overview and Resources for Module 1)
  • Large envelope (one)
  • Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart (begun in Lesson 7) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Noticing and Wondering: The Little Red Pen, Pages 29–36 (10 minutes) 

  • Gather students together whole group and ask them to sit next to a partner.
  • Tell them they will warm up their brains by remembering what happened in The Little Red Pen. Invite students to silently think about the story as you display and slowly turn through the pictures on pages 29–36 using the document camera.
  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner:

“What did you notice about the pages we read in the story yesterday?” (The characters are working to solve the problem; Highlighter is using perseverance.)

  • Invite students to turn and talk to their partner:

“What are you wondering about the story or the characters?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Guide students to wonder about how the work will get done or how characters will use habits of character. 
  • For ELLs: As students share their observations and questions with a partner, vary methods for generating response by prompting individual students with sentence starters. Examples:
    • "When Yardstick created a bridge to the hamster cage, I noticed ______."
    • Now that the characters pulled Tank onto the hamster wheel, I wonder ______." (MMAE)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unit 2 Assessment, Part I: Focused Read-aloud: The Little Red Pen, Pages 37–46 (20 minutes)

  • Direct students' attention to the posted "Learning Target" song, and invite them to sing the song along with you.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets, and read the first one aloud:
    • “I can identify a character’s feelings using evidence from the illustrations and the text.”
  • Invite students to whisper the target in their own words.
  • Direct students' attention to the posted learning targets, and read the second one aloud:
    • “I can describe an event by looking closely at the illustrations.”
  • Tell students that today they will hear the rest of the story and find out what happens to the characters. Have students pretend to open their eyes and ears to prepare to learn.
  • While still displaying The Little Red Pen, begin reading on page 37 and stop after "'Tankzilla!' Pencil shrieked" on page 37.
  • Tell students that there is a word in that sentence that shows you how Pencil is feeling.
  • Share with students that similar to the previous lesson, they will work with a partner to identify the feeling and the word that shows the feeling. Move students into pre-determined partnerships.
  • Distribute Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheets and the materials for response sheets to each pair.
  • Reread the sentence on page 37 and ask students to circle the face that shows how Scissors is feeling on their Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheets. Call on a pair that circled a scared expression to share with the class the reason they circled that face. Refer to Session 4, Feeling Words: Sample Student Response Sheet (answers, for teacher reference) as necessary.
  • Encourage students to point to each word in the sentence on their response sheet as you reread it aloud.
  • Invite pairs to circle the word that shows the feeling scared. Call on a pair that circled the word shrieked to share with the class.
  • Focus students' attention on the Words That Show Feelings anchor chart. Write the word shrieked next to the scared face. Emphasize that to shriek means to say something in a high-pitched scream.
  • While still displaying the text, continuing reading pages 37–43 and stop after "Chincheta clapped. 'Bravo!'" on page 43.
  • Tell students that there are two words on this page to show how the characters are feeling. Invite students to make an expression that shows how Chincheta is feeling.
  • Focus students' back on their Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheets. Reread the sentence and ask students to circle the face that shows how Chincheta is feeling.
  • Encourage students to point to each word in the sentence on their response sheet as you reread it aloud. Then have students put a circle around the word that shows the feeling happy. Call on a pair that circled the word clapped to share with the class.
  • Focus students' attention on the Words That Show Feelings anchor chart. Write the word clapped next to the happy face.
  • Collect students' response sheets and materials.
  • While still displaying the text, finish reading page 43 and stop. Mention to students that you know the Little Red Pen is ALSO feeling happy because the author wrote that she beamed. Write beamed on the Words That Show Feelings anchor chart next to the happy face. Invite kids to smile big while you tell them that beam means to have a very big smile.
  • Finish reading the book. Invite students to turn and talk:

“What happened once all the characters were saved from The Pit?” (They decided to work together and grade the papers.)

  • Circulate as students share to collect information on the Reading Literature Unit 2 Assessment RL.1.1/RL.1.3 Checklist RL.1.1, RL.1.3, and RL.1.7.
  • Refocus students whole group.
  • Invite them to turn and talk:

“Why didn’t anyone hide in the drawer any more?” (They were no longer afraid; they faced their fears; they know how to work together.)

  • Circulate as students share to collect information on the Reading Literature Checklist Unit 2 Assessment RL.1.1/RL.1.3, and RL.1.7 Checklist.
  • Give students specific positive feedback on using evidence from the text. (Example: "I noticed Tonya used ideas from the book to support her answer.")
  • As you split students into pairs for Session 4, Feeling Words: Student Response Sheets, provide differentiated mentors. You can do this by pairing students whose reading skills are still developing (Student A) with students with stronger reading skills (Student B). Differentiate degree of complexity by assigning Student B the task of circling the facial expression and Student A the task of circling the feeling word. Invite partners to check each other's work. (MMAE, MME)
  • For ELLs: Repeat prompts and questions for students who would benefit from hearing them more than once. Allow enough time for all students to process and respond to each question.

B. Unit 2 Assessment, Part 2: Independent Writing: "What Work Does Collaboration Help the Characters Do?" (20 minutes) 

  • Using the document camera, display the Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheet.
  • Tell students that similar to the previous two lessons, they are going write a response to what they have read. As in the last lesson, they are going to write independently. Explain that this is another opportunity for them to show what they know, and you are excited to see what they come up with. Review expectations for independent work time as necessary.
  • Hide or cover the Words That Show Feelings anchor chart.
  • Transition students back to their workspace and distribute the Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheets.
  • Ask students to point to the first picture on their student response sheet. Tell them that they should focus on the picture while you reread the sentence from that page.
  • Read the sentence "The Little Red Pen beamed." Tell students to circle the face on their response sheet that shows how Little Red Pen is feeling.
  • Invite students to put their finger in the air to get ready to point to the words in the sentence as you reread it.
  • Reread the sentence as students point to each word as you read.
  • Invite students to circle the face that shows how Little Red Pen is feeling.
  • Ask students to point to the second picture on their response sheet. Tell them that they should focus on the picture while you read the directions.
  • Read: "In this part of the text, how are the characters showing collaboration?"
  • Tell students they are now going to write their answer on the first line on the bottom of their response sheet.
  • Invite students to begin writing. Help them process by repeating the question, focusing their attention on the picture, and allowing them to whisper their answer into their hand before writing.
  • Refocus students whole group. Read: "What work does collaboration help them to do?"
  • Tell students they are now going to write their answer on the second (or third) line on the bottom of their response sheet.
  • Help students process by repeating the question, focusing their attention on the picture, and allowing them to whisper their answer into their hand before writing.
  • To vary methods for fine motor response, offer options for writing tools (examples: fine-tipped markers, pencil grips, slant boards). (MMAE)
  • For ELLs: Students may feel anxious about this assessment. Emphasize process and effort by reassuring them. (Example: "This is a chance for me to see how well I have been teaching you. While you are working, it is okay if you get stuck or don't know how to spell a word. Your responses help me know how I can do a better job teaching you. Just try your best—that's all you can do!") (MME)
  • For ELLs: Ensure that students are clear about all prompts and instructions. Rephrase directions for them. Monitor during the assessment to see that students are completing the assessment correctly. Stop students who are on the wrong track and make sure they understand the directions. 

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reflecting on Learning (10 minutes) 

  • Ask students to bring their Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheets to the whole group meeting area and sit with a partner.
  • Invite students to turn and share their writing with their partner.
  • Ask for volunteers to share with the whole class.
  • Collect students' Unit 2 Assessment: Student Response Sheets and place them in a large envelope. Explain that you will send the envelope to headquarters for them to check the students' progress.
  • Tell students they will wrap up their learning by using the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol. Remind them that they used this protocol in Lessons 7 and 8. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Direct students' attention to the posted Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face anchor chart and review as necessary.
  • Tell students they are going to participate in three rounds of the protocol.
  • Begin the protocol and prompt students with one of the following questions during each of the three rounds: 

“How do habits of character help you do work?” (They help me get things done even when they are hard.)

“Why do you think headquarters wanted us to learn about tools and about habits of character?” (We need them both to get work done.)

  • If productive, cue students to clarify the conversation by confirming what they mean:

“So, do you mean _____?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Encourage students to give a kind handshake to their last partner before returning to their workspace.
  • To help learners anticipate and prepare for sharing their thinking with a partner during the Back-to-Back and Face-to-Face protocol, provide all students with index cards that designate whether they are partner A or B. Each time students turn face-to-face, make it clear which partner (A or B) will share first. (MME)
  • As students share responses to the questions during the protocol, circulate among students and listen. If individuals or pairs of students do not make the connection, clarify this big idea by saying: "Habits of character help people when work is difficult. They help get the job done."(MMR)
  • For ELLs: Illustrate habits of character by congratulating an ELL who has demonstrated habits of character throughout the unit. (Example: "Gwen was really persevering when she was writing. I saw her erase and think and try again. Good work!")

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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