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ELA G1:M1:U1:L8

Unit 1 Assessment: Focused Read-Aloud and Writing about Tools

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These are the CCS Standards addressed in this lesson:

  • RI.1.1: Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • RI.1.7: Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.
  • SL.1.1: Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  • L.1.5: With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
  • L.1.5a: Sort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a sense of the concepts the categories represent.
  • L.1.5b: Define words by category and by one or more key attributes (e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is a large cat with stripes).

Daily Learning Target

  • I can ask and answer questions about key ideas using photographs and text. (RI.1.1, RI.1.7, SL.1.1)
  • I can sort tools into categories. (L.1.5a, L.1.5b

Ongoing Assessment

  • During the student discussion opportunities in Work Times A and B, observe and note progress toward SL.1.1 using the Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Students will revisit the written portion of this assessment throughout Units 2 and 3. Observe and support students as needed during their writing during this assessment by prompting them to use the text and classroom resources.

Agenda

AgendaTeaching Notes

1. Opening

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

B. Working with Vocabulary: Tools and Work Word Wall (5 minutes)

2. Work Time

A. Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Focused Read-aloud and Photograph Sort: Tools, Pages 18–27 (20 minutes)

B. Unit 1 Assessment, Part 2: Independent Writing: "What Job Does This Tool Help to Do?" (20 minutes)

3. Closing

A. Structured Discussion: Why Do We Need Tools? (5 minutes)

B. Song and Movement (5 minutes)

Purpose of the lesson and alignment to standards:

  • Throughout this unit, students have been practicing the skills of asking and answering questions (RI.1.1), using information gained from photographs (RL.1.7), asking clarifying questions during the picture sort (SL.1.1, L.1.5a, L.1.5b), and writing about what they know about tools (W.1.2). In the Unit 1 Assessment, students reveal what they know about tools as they demonstrate their progress toward these literacy skills. Take this opportunity to assess students who have not yet demonstrated these skills in previous lessons.
  • Although this is a formal assessment of SL.1.1a, RL.1.1, and W.1.2, students should experience the lesson as routine, since it is similar to Lessons 6 and 7. Do not overemphasize the assessment; instead, use this as an opportunity to continue to gather meaningful data.

How this lesson builds on previous work:

  • This is the final lesson of Unit 1 and should provide students with a sense of closure. The read-aloud in Work Time A focuses on a new section of Tools. Students continue to engage in discussions around the photographs while sorting as well as hearing the text read aloud in order to write their answer.
  • Continue to use Goal 1 Conversation Cues to promote productive and equitable conversation.

Assessment guidance:

  • Refer to the Assessment Overview and Resources for all supporting materials for this lesson.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.

Areas in which students may need additional support:

  • Students will revisit the written portion of the Unit 1 Assessment throughout Units 2 and 3. Some students may need additional support during the writing in this first exposure to the assessment. Prompt these students by encouraging them to use the text and classroom resources.
  • If students receive accommodations for assessments, communicate with the cooperating service providers regarding the practices of instruction in use during this study, as well as the goals of the assessment.

Down the road:

  • Unit 1 has focused on tools and how they help to do work. In Unit 2, students will learn about Habits of Character, which, as they will learn, are also needed to do work. The information about tools from Unit 1 and the information from Unit 2 will give students knowledge about the concrete and abstract details on how to do the work in Unit 3.
  • In this lesson, students complete another challenge, moving them closer to being able to complete the larger mission of creating a magnificent thing in Unit 3.

In Advance

  • Prepare:
    • Tools and Work Word Wall cards. Write each word on an index card and, where appropriate, draw a corresponding image to support students’ understanding of the word.
    • Types of Tools, Picture Set 3 (copying and cut out the pictures so there are enough sets for every pair in the class)
    • Unit 1 Assessment (see Module 1 Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Post: Learning targets, "Learning Target" poem, Sorting Protocol anchor chart, Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart, Questions about Tools anchor chart, "Tools" song.

Tech and Multimedia

Consider using an interactive whiteboard or document camera to display lesson materials. 

  • Work Time A and C: Record students as they discuss to listen to with students later to discuss strengths and what they could improve on, or to use as models for the group. Most devices (cell phones, tablets, laptop computers) come equipped with free video and audio recording apps or software.
  • Work Time C: Students complete the Cleaning/Painting Tools Sample Student Response Sheet using a word processing tool, for example a Google Doc. 

Supporting English Language Learners

Supports guided in part by CA ELD Standards 1.I.A.1 and 1.I.B.6

Important points in the lesson itself 

  • The basic design of this lesson supports ELLs by inviting them to complete assessment tasks similar to the classroom tasks completed in Lessons 1–7. Students will participate in a focused read-aloud about tools, and they will complete an independent writing on the same topic.
  • The Unit 1 Assessment may be challenging for ELLs as it may be a big leap from the heavily scaffolded classroom interaction. Before they begin, encourage students to do their best and congratulate them on the progress they’ve made learning English. Remind them of all the resources in the room that are available to them throughout the lesson. Remind students that they are participating in an activity that is very similar to what they did in previous lessons.
  • Ensure that ELLs understand the directions. Address any confusion and clarifying questions before each activity to ensure there is time to collect the necessary data from all students.
  • Observe common skills with which many students struggle while working independently. Focus on scaffolding toward these skills during the next unit. 

Universal Design for Learning

  • Multiple Means of Representation (MMR): Throughout this lesson, embed support for unfamiliar vocabulary by providing explanation and visual examples. This will help students make connections and support comprehension.
  • Multiple Means of Action & Expression (MMAE): In this lesson, students continue to practice sorting photos into categories. Prepare visual and spatial scaffolds for sorting with graphic organizers. Examples: Create a T-chart with labels; use masking tape to outline rectangle shapes on the floor.
  • Multiple Means of Engagement (MME): When you introduce new vocabulary, some students will need additional support in recognizing the relevance of new terms in their own lives. Optimize relevance by prompting students to make connections to new words based on previous experiences.

Vocabulary

Key: Lesson-Specific Vocabulary (L); Text-Specific Vocabulary (T)

New:

  • easier, track, work (L)

Review:

  • categories

Materials

  • "Learning Target" poem (from Lesson 1; one to display)
  • Tools (book; from Lesson 5; one for teacher read-aloud)
  • Tools and Work Word Wall cards (teacher-created; one for each word; see supporting materials)
  • Tools and Work Word Wall (from Lesson 3; one to display)
  • Types of Tools, Picture Set 3 (one per pair; see supporting materials)
  • Sorting Protocol anchor chart (begun in Lesson 6)
  • Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening Checklist (from Lesson 6)
  • Cleaning/Painting Tools student response sheet (one per student; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Cleaning/Painting Tools sample student response sheet (for teacher reference; see Assessment Overview and Resources)
  • Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart (begun in Lesson 2)
  • "Tools" song (from Lesson 1; one to display) 

Opening

OpeningMeeting Students' Needs

A. Reviewing Learning Targets (5 minutes)

  • Gather students together whole group and ask them to sit with a partner.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted "Learning Target" poem and invite students to chorally recite it with you.
  • Direct students’ attention to the posted learning targets and read the first one aloud:

“I can ask and answer questions about key ideas using photographs and text.”

  • Remind students that they have been using the book Tools to learn more about the types of tools there are and how those tools make work easier.
  • Invite students to whisper into their hands a type of tool that they have already talked about in class and how that tool helps us.
  • Remind students that they are going to continue to ask and answer questions about tools by looking closely at the pictures and the words in the book.
  • Enhance perceptual features by displaying the Tools anchor chart with words and pictures. (MMR)
  • Provide differentiated mentors by pairing developing readers with stronger readers. (MMAE) 

B. Working with Vocabulary: Tools and Work Word Wall (5 minutes) 

  • Show students the Tools and Work Word Wall cards. Have students pretend to put glue on their head so that the new, important words can stick.
  • Show students the Word Wall card for work. Say the word and show the picture.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

“What does work mean?” (to put effort into something)

  • Challenge students to create their own actions. As you see exemplary actions, imitate them and invite the class to join you in the motion.
  • Encourage students to use the word in a sentence to a partner. Have students repeat after you: "My mom says I need to do my work before I can play."
  • Show students the Word Wall card for easier. Say the word and show the picture.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

“What does the word easier mean?” (to make something not so difficult)

  • Show students the motion of easier by demonstrating something that is difficult to pick up and then something that is easier to pick up. Invite students to join you in the motion.
  • Encourage students to use the word in a sentence to a partner. Have students repeat after you: "Now that I can add, it is easier to do my math homework."
  • Invite students to pretend to stick the words onto their heads. 
  • As you introduce new vocabulary, optimize relevance by prompting students to connect new terms to previous expeirences. Examples: "What is something that has gotten easier for you to do since kindergarten? Pumping on the swings? Writing? Whisper one thing that’s gotten easier since kindergarten to your shoulder partner." (MME)
  • For ELLs: Identify the -er suffix. Say: "When I see -er at the end of a word, I know that means more. So what does easier mean?" (more easy)

Work Time

Work TimeMeeting Students' Needs

A. Unit 1 Assessment, Part 1: Focused Read-aloud and Photograph Sort: Tools, Pages 18–27 (20 minutes) 

  • Focus students’ attention on Tools. Tell students you will reread the last section in order to complete their mission.
  • Refer to the question words on the Tools and Work Word Wall and encourage students to use this resource as they see pictures in the book that they have questions about.
  • Display and reread pages 18–27 of Tools aloud. While reading, pause and call on volunteers to ask questions about the pictures in the book. If there are many volunteers, allow students to say their question as a superhero (put a bent elbow across their face, as if holding up a cape).
  • Direct students’ attention to the second learning target and read it aloud.
    • “I can sort tools into categories.”
  • Hold up one set of Types of Tools, Picture Set 3 and say: "Just like yesterday, we have seen many types of tools in the book. Today, these photographs show cleaning tools and painting tools."
  • Tell students they are going to use the Sorting protocol and work their partner, just as they have done in the past few lessons, to sort the pictures into two categories: cleaning tools and painting tools. Point students to the Sorting Protocol anchor chart and review as necessary. (Refer to the Classroom Protocols document for the full version of the protocol.)
  • Place a set of Types of Tools, Picture Set 3 in front of each pair of students.
  • Invite students to begin the protocol.
  • Circulate to collect information on the Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening Checklist. In order to gather sufficient data, prompt each student to share in more detail.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by saying more:

“Can you say more about that?” (Responses will vary.)

  • Give students specific positive feedback about the conversations and questions you heard them using in pairs.
  • Have students clean up their pictures and turn them in.
  • Transition students to workspaces by having them use an air pen to write their names in the air.
  • As you review the Sorting protocol, customize the display of information by using masking tape to create two clear "categories" on the floor. Briefly remind students how to sort using photos from the previous lesson (cooking tools vs. eating tools) and demonstrate by sorting a few photo cards into two categories. (MMR)
  • For ELLs: To prepare students for success during the sorting activity and assessment, invite clarifying questions if students are unclear or confused about the information in the book.
  • For ELLs: Repeat the instructions for students who would benefit from hearing them multiple times.
  • For the sorting task, provide alternative response strategies by inviting students to use a T-chart with two categories (labeled "cleaning tools" and "painting tools"). As the teacher or a partner holds up the photo card, invite individual students to indicate the correct category by pointing. (MMAE)
  • As students are invited to sort photo cards, differentiate the degree of difficulty by reducing or expanding the number of cards for individual students. (MME)

B. Unit 1 Assessment, Part 2: Independent Writing: "What Job Does This Tool Help to Do?" (20 minutes) 

  • Invite students to sit with a nearby partner at their workspace.
  • Distribute the Cleaning/Painting Tools student response sheets.
  • Say: "Now that we know what types of tools these are, I want to know more about these tools. I will turn to the index to read more about these tools." Remind them that they are familiar with this routine from previous lessons. 
  • Using Tools, point to the picture from page 23. Ask students to also point to the picture on their response sheet that shows a woman cleaning. Circulate to ensure all students are pointing to the correct picture.
  • Tell students you are going to read the caption for that picture, and you want them to think about the following question:

“What is the name of this tool?”

  • Read aloud the caption in the index for page 23.
  • Invite students to turn and talk:

“What is the name of this tool?” (a broom)

  • Circulate to collect information on the Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening Checklist. In order to gather sufficient data, prompt each student to share in more detail.
  • Invite students to label their picture with the tool’s name.
  • Refocus students on the picture. Tell students you are going to repeat this process with a new question:

“What job does the tool help to do?”

  • Reread the caption in the index for page 23, ask students to turn and talk, and circulate to collect information on the Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening Checklist.
  • Invite students to write their sentence below the picture on their response sheet.
  • Choose a student to read his or her sentence aloud for the class. Give specific positive feedback to the student about the process s/he took to write the sentence.
  • Repeat this process with the picture for page 27.
  • Collect student work. Invite students to watch as you place their work in a special folder to send to Headquarters to show how they have progressed with their mission. Refer to the Cleaning/Painting Tools sample student response sheet (for teacher reference). Note any foundational skills that may need to be reviewed during the K-2 Skills Block as you review students’ work.
  • As students begin independent writing, embed support for symbol-sound relationships by providing mini alphabet strips for reference at students’ workspaces. (MMR) 
  • For ELLs: Read the caption for page 23 twice for each discussion prompt—once before asking the questions and once after asking the questions. This will provide students more time to process the text and to formulate their answers to discussion questions.
  • Consider seating arrangements that provide differentiated mentors by seating developing readers/writers with stronger readers/writers. (MMAE)
  • As students work on the response activity, vary demands of the task by differentiating the degree of complexity. Example: Allow individual students to focus effort only on labeling the picture, while others may extend the activity by writing multiple sentences. (MME)

Closing & Assessments

ClosingMeeting Students' Needs

A. Structured Discussion: Why Do We Need Tools? (5 minutes) 

  • Gather students together whole group.
  • Focus their attention on the Classroom Discussion Norms anchor chart. Remind students to keep the list in mind while they discuss the guiding question for Unit 1.
  • Ask students to turn and talk:

“Why do we need tools?”

  • As students discuss, circulate and listen to collect information on the Unit 1 Assessment Speaking and Listening checklist. Prompt students to continue sharing with one another.
  • If productive, cue students to expand the conversation by giving an example:

“Can you give an example?” (Responses will vary.) 

  • Activate background knowledge by reminding students they can use the Tools anchor chart to help them answer the discussion question. (MMR)
  • Before students respond to the question whole group, provide options for expression and communication by prompting students to first respond to the question in Think-Pair-Share. (MMAE)

C. Song and Movement (5 minutes)

  • With excitement, tell students that they should celebrate all of their learning about tools and that soon, they will hear from Headquarters about what they will need to learn next!
  • Begin singing the "Tools" song and encourage students to sing along with you. 
  • Add movement to make the song interactive. (Example: Pretend to use a hammer to tap, tap, tap.)
  • Optimize relevance by asking: "Can you think of another cleaning tool (or painting tool) that wasn’t discussed today? Whisper to your shoulder partner." (MME)
  • As students gather for the song, help them build fluency and provide differentiated mentors by pairing developing readers with stronger readers. (MMAE)

Assessment

Each unit in the K-2 Language Arts Curriculum has one standards-based assessment built in. The module concludes with a performance task at the end of Unit 3 to synthesize their understanding of what they accomplished through supported, standards-based writing.

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